What is there on Moon?


selfsame
#1
Moon has a day of 14 1/2 of our days, and its night is also 14 1/2 of our days.
It has no atmosphere or water and there is no life on it.
It has a large number of craters; and a thick layer of fluffy sand.
It has a large number of mountains; and it faces the earth with one face only, the other hemisphere is invisible to us on earth.
Its core is cold.
It has a fluctuating surface temperature: from severe heat at day time, to severe coldness at its night.
============================================

Planet Mercury has much similarity to our Moon, with many differences, like that: Mercury has one of its hemispheres always facing the sun with a perpetual day on this side, while the other hemisphere is in perpetual night.
(Notice the difference: our Moon faces the sun for 14 1/2 of our days, and then this side will be in the darkness of night for 14 1/2 of our days.
 
EagleSmack
+1
#2
 
Ludlow
+1
#3
Green cheese
 
Ron in Regina
+4
#4  Top Rated Post
Zionists! I hear there are sneaky Zionists on the moon,
being all Zionisty and such.....

Zionist Moon Base Plans Revealed - The Mideast Beast
 
Angstrom
#5
Awww, the Zionist beat you to it

It's true that Muhammed was never someone to make anything. He just likes killing and taking it from the ones who make things.

And enslaving souls, that's his favorit.

A slave master in life, and a slave master for all eternity. May he harvest your soul.
 
darkbeaver
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Angstrom View Post

Awww, the Zionist beat you to it

It's true that Muhammed was never someone to make anything. He just likes killing and taking it from the ones who make things.

And enslaving souls, that's his favorit.

A slave master in life, and a slave master for all eternity. May he harvest your soul.

Make light of your soul at your peril. Are your moorings secure?
 
Twila
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

Make light of your soul at your peril. Are your moorings secure?

all you need is a towel. Fact.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#8
Now, there's a lass who really knows where her towel is!
 
gopher
#9
 
MHz
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by selfsame View Post

Moon has a day of 14 1/2 of our days, and its night is also 14 1/2 of our days.
It has no atmosphere or water and there is no life on it.
It has a large number of craters; and a thick layer of fluffy sand.
It has a large number of mountains; and it faces the earth with one face only, the other hemisphere is invisible to us on earth.
Its core is cold.
It has a fluctuating surface temperature: from severe heat at day time, to severe coldness at its night.
============================================

Planet Mercury has much similarity to our Moon, with many differences, like that: Mercury has one of its hemispheres always facing the sun with a perpetual day on this side, while the other hemisphere is in perpetual night.
(Notice the difference: our Moon faces the sun for 14 1/2 of our days, and then this side will be in the darkness of night for 14 1/2 of our days.

Are you sure about that math? The moon orbits the earth about once every 24 hours. Since it is in tidal lock the sun should shine on the whole moon during that one day, about 12 hours per day on any one spot.
Okay, no life.
Odd that all that fluffy dust that was being thrown all over that it only landed in the part of the earth that would not be a 'protruding rock' as evidenced in all the Apollo pics.

How do you know the core is cold, at 1 time it had to be molten and the core being heavier was attracted to earth more than the lighter material that makes up the crust of the surface. Moving further away over time means the migration would stop due to less gravity being applied rather than it becoming too cold. As it cooled off there should have been come subduction as the core and mantle shrank in size that happens when any mass loses heat.

Perhaps our core is being pulled towards the sun at a slightly faster rate than the crust and that is pulling the core off center and it's interaction with the magma is to slow its speed down and that relates to the days and night being longer over time.

It sound likes mercury is also in a tidal lock with the sun just like the moon is with the earth.

Venus has an atmosphere that is 'active' so perhaps constant winds can affect the rotation of a whole planet if they blow the same direction for millions of years. Nor do I know the speed of the bigger planets at the same diameter the earth is so speculation has it's limits at the moment.

Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

Nice house,until you come home some day and it has rolled away. Might be the ticket for getting through a twister though, or inside of a soccer ball sized clear one and send the camera out into the storm to go where the wind blows it. Then turn that into an I-Max VR ride.
 
Jinentonix
#11
Quote:

How do you know the core is cold

Basic physics and observation. A)The moon does not rotate on an axis. B) There's no, and I mean no magnetosphere of any kind.
A rapidly rotating object like a planet helps provide the core's spinning action. This keeps the liquid portion of the core moving around, thus constantly moving the material around helping to prevent it from solidifying. Mass also plays an important role as pressure from above also helps generate lots of heat. The moon is not very big nor does it contain enough mass to create that kind of pressure. It's the combination of the spinning liquid AND solid core that generates a magnetosphere.


Also, what they are saying when they say that the moon's core is cold, is that the core has essentially solidified. The core is probably still pretty damn warm once you get closer to it, but you likely won't find any magma.


In short, the lack of rotation and mass means the moon's core is pretty much solid by now.
 
Walter
#12
To answer the thread title: a definite article.
 
Curious Cdn
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

all you need is a towel. Fact.

... package of salty peanuts doesn't hurt, either ...

Oh, ummm ...kosher peanuts.

Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Are you sure about that math? The moon orbits the earth about once every 24 hours. Since it is in tidal lock the sun should shine on the whole moon during that one day, about 12 hours per day on any one spot.

The moon orbits the Earth in a moonth, also called a month.


Anyway, Mercury spins an it's axis, just like the Earth does and it does not have he same face exposed to the sun, all if the time.

http://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&source...7JJg8UbDeKbzbQ
 
Blackleaf
+1
#14
Wallace and Gromit went there to have a bit of a change from eating Wensleydale.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0qagA4_eVQ
 
Walter
#15
Some people have zits on Moon.
 
MHz
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Anyway, Mercury spins an it's axis, just like the Earth does and it does not have he same face exposed to the sun, all if the time.

How about we leave the subjects of you salty nuts being kosher or nor for one of your 'special threads'?

It takes Mercury about 59 Earth days to spin once on its axis (the rotation period), and about 88 Earth days to complete one orbit about the Sun. However, the length of the day on Mercury (sunrise to sunrise) is 176 Earth days.

4B years ago the length ofday on the earth was supposed to be about 6 hrscompared to the 24 hrs it is today and 4B years from now it could be 48 hrs long. Without getting into the other dynamics of Mercury (for the moment) the length of her day 4B years ago and 4B in the future may show that the 176 days has not been the length of a day at those points in her history. If she (or Venus or Mars) show the orbital speed is slowing then the effect could be cause by a transition to a tidal lock condition being the final factor in 'how long a day will last'. Hope I am making proper use of the numbers.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Basic physics and observation. A)The moon does not rotate on an axis.

Wrong. The moon does rotate on its axis. It simply rotates at the same rate at which it revolves around the earth, so it's "day" is the same length as it's "year" (period of revolution around the earth). The same used to be thought true of Mercury and the sun, but it turns out that Mercury is not completely tide-locked, and does not keep the same face always to the sun.
 
JLM
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Some people have zits on Moon.


Who was it you were talking to?
 
MHz
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Wrong. The moon does rotate on its axis. It simply rotates at the same rate at which it revolves around the earth, so it's "day" is the same length as it's "year" (period of revolution around the earth). The same used to be thought true of Mercury and the sun, but it turns out that Mercury is not completely tide-locked, and does not keep the same face always to the sun.

Wouldn't the moon's year be be the same length as the earth's, both take 365.25 days to orbit the sun. In that respect does the moon experience 'seasons' (poles have variable length days/nights on an average year as it is not above the same location above the earth each day of those 365 orbits.
 
taxslave
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by selfsame View Post

Moon has a day of 14 1/2 of our days, and its night is also 14 1/2 of our days.
It has no atmosphere or water and there is no life on it.
It has a large number of craters; and a thick layer of fluffy sand.
It has a large number of mountains; and it faces the earth with one face only, the other hemisphere is invisible to us on earth.
Its core is cold.
It has a fluctuating surface temperature: from severe heat at day time, to severe coldness at its night.
============================================

Planet Mercury has much similarity to our Moon, with many differences, like that: Mercury has one of its hemispheres always facing the sun with a perpetual day on this side, while the other hemisphere is in perpetual night.
(Notice the difference: our Moon faces the sun for 14 1/2 of our days, and then this side will be in the darkness of night for 14 1/2 of our days.

Cheese. Everyone knows the moon is made of cheese.
 
MHz
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

The moon orbits the Earth in a moonth, also called a month.

How complicated do you want this to get?
That is accepting that the more detail that is exposed the more realistic the theory will be. There are several factors at play here apparently and this is not even accounting for the magnification effect of water vapor in the air when the photo is taken below mountain top elevations. Focal length of the lens would also effect the magnification level if it was not exactly 50mm and there is an object in the foreground that adds perspective and measurable depth that should be part of the math involved in verifying the 'super moon' being observable when its distance translated to something on earth would probably be quite small of a shift at a very long distance. (if that distance is actually correct but lets say it is for the moment)

Does the extra 8% (from 50% at any 1 time to 58% observation over a set period of time) mark it N/S variance from being above the equator all the time. The earth should also have a similar variance compared to our position to the sun's equator. Those variances could be fed into the gravitational wave formula and the past and future could be plotted and those variances might help in (natural) weather forecasts at the 100 year level as far as warming and cooling goes.

On a global scale the warming in the Pacific regions near the equator could also be 'caused' by the current speeding up a fraction and the current that sinks leaves it's heat at the upper levels of the water as it sinks to the floor and flows along that part of the cycle.

An increase in the rifting off the American west coast would have some of that heat taken south as that is the direction the current flows on the bottom as well as at the surface. If the surface water is heating up then some heat was taken by the lower currents before it could release it's heat to the atmosphere. Depending on the speed that heat would surface someplace near the equator, causing an El Nino year as that heat in the air blows across the Americas. If that trend continues the air rising faster over the water will end up going north rather that east and that would change all of North America.

Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Cheese. Everyone knows the moon is made of cheese.

Cottage cheese judging from the backside or are those the moons zits that Walter mentioned?
 
gopher
+1
#22
First Men On The Moon



[youtube]BNLZntSdyKE[/youtube]
 
selfsame
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Are you sure about that math? The moon orbits the earth about once every 24 hours. Since it is in tidal lock the sun should shine on the whole moon during that one day, about 12 hours per day on any one spot.

Moon completes its orbit around Earth in about 29 days and 12 hours; therefore, the lunar months are 29 and 30 days successively: i.e. one month it is 29 days and the other is 30 days.

Now, during its circling around the earth the moon faces the sun for about or more than 14 (of our days) which is its day, and its night is in the same way about or more than 14 days.

We see only one of its two sides or faces; in this face we see its day: once as a crescent then more than a crescent until it becomes full moon, then will decrease until it will become once again a crescent then will be in its wane.

http://quran-ayat.com/universe/new_p...s_of_the_Moon_
Last edited by selfsame; Apr 7th, 2016 at 03:20 PM..
 
Curious Cdn
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

How complicated do you want this to get?
That is accepting that the more detail that is exposed the more realistic the theory will be. There are several factors at play here apparently and this is not even accounting for the magnification effect of water vapor in the air when the photo is taken below mountain top elevations. Focal length of the lens would also effect the magnification level if it was not exactly 50mm and there is an object in the foreground that adds perspective and measurable depth that should be part of the math involved in verifying the 'super moon' being observable when its distance translated to something on earth would probably be quite small of a shift at a very long distance. (if that distance is actually correct but lets say it is for the moment)

Does the extra 8% (from 50% at any 1 time to 58% observation over a set period of time) mark it N/S variance from being above the equator all the time. The earth should also have a similar variance compared to our position to the sun's equator. Those variances could be fed into the gravitational wave formula and the past and future could be plotted and those variances might help in (natural) weather forecasts at the 100 year level as far as warming and cooling goes.

On a global scale the warming in the Pacific regions near the equator could also be 'caused' by the current speeding up a fraction and the current that sinks leaves it's heat at the upper levels of the water as it sinks to the floor and flows along that part of the cycle.

An increase in the rifting off the American west coast would have some of that heat taken south as that is the direction the current flows on the bottom as well as at the surface. If the surface water is heating up then some heat was taken by the lower currents before it could release it's heat to the atmosphere. Depending on the speed that heat would surface someplace near the equator, causing an El Nino year as that heat in the air blows across the Americas. If that trend continues the air rising faster over the water will end up going north rather that east and that would change all of North America.


Cottage cheese judging from the backside or are those the moons zits that Walter mentioned?

If you think the simple fact that the moon orbits the earth in a month ... twenty eight days, actually ...such a well known and ancient fact that a whole lot of cultures (Chinese, for instance) based their calendars on it ...is so "complicated", I would say that you are smoking so much pot that your frontal cortex lobes have turned to Wensleydale cheese.
 
darkbeaver
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

First Men On The Moon



[youtube]BNLZntSdyKE[/youtube]


That is so iconic, to me at least, I have never forgotten it. The picture at least.
Silent movies were so cool. Black and white, perfected contrast, colour ruined the magic, an imposition of the mind of viewer who would if allowed have arranged the colour like they always did.
 
MHz
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

If you think the simple fact that the moon orbits the earth in a month ... twenty eight days, actually ...such a well known and ancient fact that a whole lot of cultures (Chinese, for instance) based their calendars on it ...is so "complicated", I would say that you are smoking so much pot that your frontal cortex lobes have turned to Wensleydale cheese.

My post was about the moon's distance from the earth, once you grasp that feel free to post something other than your usual dribble.

Quote: Originally Posted by selfsame View Post


Now, during its circling around the earth the moon faces the sun for about or more than 14 (of our days) which is its day, and its night is in the same way about or more than 14 days.

I understand your point, sorry for the original confusion.
 
Ludlow
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

My post was about the moon's distance from the earth, once you grasp that feel free to post something other than your usual dribble.


I understand your point, sorry for the original confusion.

Well I for one am thankful that you all informed me on how far the moon is from the
earth or what the fukk ever. It's something I can tell my friends down at the pub.
 
MHz
#28
Is that the same friends you buy drinks for but they never buy you any?
 
Ludlow
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Is that the same friends you buy drinks for but they never buy you any?

No dummy I don't buy folks shyt. Unlike you though, I can consume a margarita now and then because I don' have to worry about mixing psyche drugs with booze.

Now,,get back to your riveting conversation about how far the fukkin moon is from the earth.
 
lone wolf
#30
Isn't the confusion over mooning the point Nazz slipped his elastics?
 

Similar Threads

37
We need a Moon base
by dumpthemonarchy | Jun 28th, 2019
2
Sh!t on the moon
by Locutus | Nov 22nd, 2014
23
Colonies on the Moon?
by gc | Aug 24th, 2006