Roman road and ancient mine with cesspits are discovered in Cornwall


Blackleaf
#1
The remains of a suspected ancient mine and a Roman road complete with cesspits and old military buildings have been uncovered by archaeologists in Cornwall.

Experts were digging near a Roman fort found at Calstock in 2007, but found a previously-unknown series of deep pits connected by arched tunnels.

The team, from Exeter University, say that the mine may have contained 'some of the richest mineral deposits in the world' – and would've been worked hundreds of years ago.

Buried Roman road and an ancient MINE complete with cesspits is discovered by archaeologists in Cornwall


Archaeologists have discovered a Roman road and possible ancient mine

Experts will carry out further analysis of the previously-unknown deep pits

Excavations, in Cornwall, revealed the series of pits are connected by tunnels

It is likely to be a mine worked many hundreds of years ago when the area was famed for having some of the richest mineral deposits in the world

By Victoria Bell For Mailonline
4 July 2019

The remains of a suspected ancient mine and a Roman road complete with cesspits and old military buildings have been uncovered by archaeologists in Cornwall.

Experts were digging near a Roman fort found at Calstock in 2007, but found a previously-unknown series of deep pits connected by arched tunnels.

The team, from Exeter University, say that the mine may have contained 'some of the richest mineral deposits in the world' – and would've been worked hundreds of years ago.

Pits are typical of an ancient mine in Britain but experts need to analyse the site further to confirm their suspicions, as well as verifying the age.


The remains of a suspected ancient mine and a Roman road have been uncovered 'unexpectedly' by archaeologists in Cornwall. Experts were digging near a Roman fort found in 2007, but found a previously-unknown series of deep pits connected by arched tunnels


No objects were found in the possible mine, making it hard to date when it was used.

One of the deep pits cuts into the Roman road, so it is likely that they are later than the Roman military occupation of the area.

Excavations in 2008 and 2011 revealed that it may have been constructed around AD 50 while.

This year, the team focused on the west gate at the front of the fort.

The Roman road, which would have served regular military traffic in and out of the fort.

'Whilst we still do not know their age, it is possible that they are from the medieval period,' said Dr Chris Smart, of the University of Exeter, who led the dig.


The team, from Exeter University, say that the mine may have contained 'some of the richest mineral deposits in the world' – and would've worked hundreds of years ago. Pits are typical of an ancient mine in Britain but experts need to analyse the site further to confirm


No objects were found in the possible mine, making it hard to date when it was used. One of the deep pits cuts into the Roman road, so it is likely that they are later than the Roman military occupation of the area


The excavation revealed a 'rare glimpse' of timber-built Roman military buildings, as well as rubbish and cesspits but Dr Smart said the mine was an 'unexpected bonus'.

The local area in south east Cornwall and West Devon is a historical hotspot for mining, due to its significant tin and copper deposits.

Dr Smart said: 'It has been wonderful working with so many of the local community to better understand the area's Roman and medieval past.

'We are very pleased to have found such a well-made Roman road and the possible mine workings have proved a real unexpected bonus.

'Whilst we still do not know their age, it is possible that they are from the medieval period'.

Archaeologists have spent the past month digging near to the site of the previously-found Roman fort at Calstock, in the Tamar Valley.


The excavation revealed a 'rare glimpse' of timber-built Roman military buildings, as well as rubbish and cesspits but Dr Smart said the mine was an 'unexpected bonus'. The local area in south east Cornwall and West Devon is a historical hotspot for mining


The excavation revealed a 'rare glimpse' of timber-built Roman military buildings, as well as rubbish and cesspits but Dr Smart said the mine was an 'unexpected bonus'. The local area in south east Cornwall and West Devon is a historical hotspot for mining, due to its significant tin and copper deposits

The archaeologists have previously found the remains of a medieval timber longhouse, suggesting the site was later occupied between the 8th and early 13th century but was then deserted.

This explains why the parish church, originally built to be at the heart of a hamlet or village, is now isolated.

The experts say that at some point, a second 'defensive circuit' was added to protect buildings outside of the fort, which may point to a 'period of heightened threat'.

However, one of the deeper pits cuts into the Roman road, which could be a sign that they came later than the Roman military occupation of the area.

Further digs are planned in 2021, funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund as part of the wider Understanding Landscapes project.


The excavation revealed a 'rare glimpse' of timber-built Roman military buildings, as well as rubbish and cesspits but Dr Smart said the mine was an 'unexpected bonus'. Here, a piece of Roman pottery

HOW IMPORTANT ARE ROMAN ROADS?


Via Giulia Augusta leading across the Pont Flavien in Saint-Chamas in southern France


Roman roads were large structures, typically measuring 16 to 23ft (five to seven metres) wide.

They reached a height of around one-and-a-half feet (half a metre) in the centre.

While the Romans were famous for building roads in straight lines, the discovery of a road between Ribchester and Lancaster shows they also took the natural geography of a place into account, to avoid steep hills, for example.

The roads were used to transport goods efficiently and for marching soldiers.

Preservation of Roman roads in the UK varies, with some still protruding from the land and easily visible.

Others are hidden under earth and have only been found thanks to Lidar.

For decades after the 43AD Roman invasion of Britain, a large region of the North, including what is now Lancashire, Yorkshire and Cumbria, was controlled by a Celtic tribe known as the Brigantes.

Roman writer Tacitus wrote it was the collapse of the marriage between Queen Cartimandua of the Brigantes - a Roman ally and her husband Venetius - that led to a showdown with Rome.




Roman roads were large structures, typically measuring 16 to 23ft wide. In the image top, chariot ruts can be seen on the Via Domitia near Ambrussum. On the bottom, a view of Via Applia Antica

Following their divorce, Venetius organised a revolt in 69AD and Cartimandua fled.

The Emperor Vespasian then sent a force under Britain's new governor, Quintus Petilius Cerialis, to put down the rebellion and conquer northern England.

Building roads to link up forts and settlements across this rugged landscape was a vital part of this decades-long conquest of the North.

The Romans purposefully built their roads to be very straight to make journey times as short as possible.

As compasses were yet to be invented, Roman surveyors used a piece of equipment called a groma – a wooden cross with weights hanging down from it - to help make the roads straight.

The roads were used to transport goods efficiently and for marching soldiers.




Preservation of Roman roads in the UK varies, with some still protruding from the land and easily visible.

Many of the roads paved direct routes between isolated regions and towns.

This network greatly encouraged trade at the time as the travel time was slashed.

Research has found that many of the roads that have existed for millennia have formed the backbone of economic routes to this day.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...ient-mine.html
 
NZDoug
Free Thinker
#2
Cool, sh*t there.
Im a big Isambard Kingdom Brunel fan.
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#3
The celts laid those roads out BEFORE the Romans came along and paved them. Tin was a fundimental to the bromze age.

Funny but "the battle of TROY" actually happened in England. Over Tin.

T h e R e a l S t o r y O f T r o y

VISIT THE REAL
TROJAN BATTLEFIELD

Troy and the Trojan War location has been found and the battlefield completely reconstructed from the scattered but very detailed information given in Homer's Iliad.

Troy in England, however unbelievable, is fully explained in this amazing work which provides in depth information and evidence of all kinds including geographic and linguistic evidence as well as countless archaeological finds.

The war was not waged by Greeks and not caused by the abduction of Helen. The real reason was access to tin in Britain, a precious metal which was essential for the production of bronze, a key war material of the time.

During the second millennium BC, it was the custom of illiterate Sea Peoples migrating from western Europe to verbally pass on history, that's how the tales of the greatest war of prehistory, the Trojan War was first recorded.

Previously, Hissarlik in Turkey was thought to be the location of Troy, but no traces of the Trojan war have been found near there.

You will discover this work clearly demonstrates that the Iliad, however poetic, is based on real historical events in Bronze Age Western Europe.

For the first time, readers of the Iliad and Trojan history can follow the action in the field.
http://www.troy-in-england.co.uk/

"CAM" means "forge" in Latin
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#4
The Celts didn't build the arrow straight ones and they seem to have used the natural waterways more but yes, there was an infrastructure in place in Britian from thousands of years before the Romans marched ashore.
 
Blackleaf
#5
There's a Roman road which goes north from Manchester (Mamucium). It passes the outskirts of Bolton, where I live, ten miles outside Manchester city centre. My mate Stuart lives on it. It's hard to believe it's a Roman road whenever I'm in his house because it's full of modern traffic. We simply call it "the Roman road".
 
Blackleaf
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

The Celts didn't build the arrow straight ones and they seem to have used the natural waterways more but yes, there was an infrastructure in place in Britian from thousands of years before the Romans marched ashore.

There are some roads in Britain that are so old that herds of reindeer coming down from the Arctic used to go down them when heading south in the days before Britain was a group of islands.

This is truly an ancient land.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

There are some roads in Britain that are so old that herds of reindeer coming down from the Arctic used to go down them when heading south in the days before Britain was a group of islands.
This is truly an ancient land.

When canoing in the Canadian North, most of the portages ... the best ones, anyway ... follow trails that are made by deer and moose moving from lake to lake. They may not be the most direct lines but guaranteed, they will be the easiest routes. They have also been in continuous use for 10-11-12,000 years.
 
Blackleaf
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

When canoing in the Canadian North, most of the portages ... the best ones, anyway ... follow trails that are made by deer and moose moving from lake to lake. They may not be the most direct lines but guaranteed, they will be the easiest routes. They have also been in continuous use for 10-11-12,000 years.

And yours are still in use. Unfortunately, we never get to see anymore herds of reindeer crossing from Yorkshire to Lancashire over the Pennines. Just hordes of stingy, Wensleydale scoffing, sheep-shagging White Rose pricks whenever Yorkshire play Lancashire in the County Championship.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#9
Rome. . . the first European Union.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

And yours are still in use. Unfortunately, we never get to see anymore herds of reindeer crossing from Yorkshire to Lancashire over the Pennines. Just hordes of stingy, Wensleydale scoffing, sheep-shagging White Rose pricks whenever Yorkshire play Lancashire in the County Championship.

Your top predator is the Badger. Maybe, we should send you some Grizzly bears.


.... or maybe, our native Badgers ..?

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/an...s/w/wolverine/
 
Tecumsehsbones
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Your top predator is the Badger. Maybe, we should send you some Grizzly bears.
.... or maybe, our native Badgers ..?
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/an...s/w/wolverine/

No, their top predators are BNP scum and Tory politicians. Though the CoE priests give 'em a run for their money.
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

The Celts didn't build the arrow straight ones and they seem to have used the natural waterways more but yes, there was an infrastructure in place in Britian from thousands of years before the Romans marched ashore.

“Roman roads were actually built by the Celts”

A new book by biographer and historian Graham Robb claims ‘Roman’ roads were in fact built by the Druids, the Celt’s scientific and spiritual leaders. Calling into question two millennia of thinking about Iron Age Britain and Europe, Robb claims Celts developed straight roads in the 4th century BC.
https://www.historyextra.com/period/...-by-the-celts/

 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

“Roman roads were actually built by the Celts”
A new book by biographer and historian Graham Robb claims ‘Roman’ roads were in fact built by the Druids, the Celt’s scientific and spiritual leaders. Calling into question two millennia of thinking about Iron Age Britain and Europe, Robb claims Celts developed straight roads in the 4th century BC.
https://www.historyextra.com/period/...-by-the-celts/

Could be. There certainly are ancient roads connecting all of those hill forts.
 
Blackleaf
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Your top predator is the Badger. Maybe, we should send you some Grizzly bears.
.... or maybe, our native Badgers ..?
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/an...s/w/wolverine/

I would say the fox and the eagle are higher than the badger.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

I would say the fox and the eagle are higher than the badger.

Aren't they just another "Watney's pub?
 
Blackleaf
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Aren't they just another "Watney's pub?

The only pub I know with "eagle" in its name is The Eagle and Child in Bury. It does a nice Ploughman's Lunch for just £2.50.

But I bet there are a few Fox and Eagle pubs knocking about.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#17
There's a Fox'n Ewe up in Yorkshire, or so I've heard.
 
Blackleaf
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

There's a Fox'n Ewe up in Yorkshire, or so I've heard.

There aren't any anywhere.

There's a Ewe and Lamb in Bromsgrove.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#19
No Fox'n Sheep in Yorkshire?

I don't believe you.