Scotland's crannogs are older than Stonhenge


Blackleaf
#1
Archaeologists have discovered that some Scottish crannogs are thousands of years older than previously thought.

Crannogs were fortified settlements constructed on artificial islands in lochs.


Scotland's crannogs are older than Stonehenge

13 June 2019
BBC News


Neolithic pottery was previously found near crannogs in the Western Isles

Archaeologists have discovered that some Scottish crannogs are thousands of years older than previously thought.

Crannogs were fortified settlements constructed on artificial islands in lochs.

It was thought they were first built in the Iron Age, a period that began around 800 BC.

But four Western Isles sites have been radiocarbon dated to about 3640-3360 BC in the Neolithic period - before the erection of Stonehenge's stone circle.

The prehistoric monument in Wiltshire is one of Britain's best-known Neolithic features. Stonehenge's stone circle was erected in the late Neolithic period, about 2500 BC.

Another famous Neolithic site is Skara Brae, a village in Orkney inhabited between 3200 BC and 2200 BC.


One of the crannogs in the Western Isles has a stone causeway

Archaeologists Dr Duncan Garrow, of University of Reading, and Dr Fraser Sturt, from the University of Southampton, investigated four crannog artificial islands in the Isle of Lewis in the Western Isles.

At one of the sites well-preserved Neolithic pottery had previously been found on the loch bed by Chris Murray, a former Royal Navy diver who lives in Lewis.

The archaeologists' investigation included making underwater surveys and carrying out excavations at the sites to obtain "conclusive evidence of artificial islet construction during the Neolithic".


Four crannogs in the Western Isles were found to date to the Neolithic period

The archaeologists, whose research has been published in the journal Antiquity, said the crannogs represented "a monumental effort" through the piling up of boulders on the loch bed, and in the case of a site in Loch Bhorgastail the building of a stone causeway.

They said it was possible other Scottish crannogs, and similar sites in Ireland, were also Neolithic.

Previously it was thought crannogs were built and re-used over a period of 2,500 years from the Iron Age to the post-medieval period.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotla...lands-48625734
 
Curious Cdn
#2
Times just have been tough to have lead our ancestors to go to so much trouble to build defensable structures like crannogs. That would have been a lot of hard work and it hints at real danger around them.
 
Danbones
#3
They knew tax collectors would soon show up.
 
Blackleaf
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Times just have been tough to have lead our ancestors to go to so much trouble to build defensable structures like crannogs. That would have been a lot of hard work and it hints at real danger around them.

Even though they have useful defensive properties, crannogs appear to have been much more than just for defence. Archaeologists have found few weapons and evidence of destruction in them.

There are nearly 2000 crannogs in the British Isles. The word "crannog" comes from Old Irish, meaning "young tree."
 
NZDoug
#5
I'm digging the Lewis Chessmen, I read Peter Mays "The Lewis Trilogy" then all his other works.
Great author and amazing history, the Hebrides.
 
Curious Cdn
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by NZDoug View Post

I'm digging the Lewis Chessmen, I read Peter Mays "The Lewis Trilogy" then all his other works.
Great author and amazing history, the Hebrides.

the Hebrewdes are full of Jews, right MHz?
 
Blackleaf
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

the Hebrewdes are full of Jews, right MHz?

They are full of Syrian asylum seekers.
 
Curious Cdn
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

They are full of Syrian asylum seekers.

Cold, fecking place to store them.

Still, they could use some genetic diversity on Lewis p, where everyone is a close cousin.
 
Blackleaf
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by NZDoug View Post

I'm digging the Lewis Chessmen, I read Peter Mays "The Lewis Trilogy" then all his other works.
Great author and amazing history, the Hebrides.

The Outer Hebrides, before they became part of Scotland and Britain, were part of the Viking Kingdom of the Isles.

Last edited by Blackleaf; Jun 27th, 2019 at 05:37 PM..
 
Curious Cdn
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The Outer Hebrides, before they became part of Scotland and Britain, were part of the Viking Kingdom of the Isles.

Old MacDonald was a Norse, ee-ei-ee-ei-oh!
 
Blackleaf
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Cold, fecking place to store them.
Still, they could use some genetic diversity on Lewis p, where everyone is a close cousin.

For some reason the Scottish Government thought it would be a good place to house them. Still, they might be cold, barren and windswept and the nightlife a bit shitty but it still beats living in Syria.

Visitors to South Uist nowadays are naturally quite disturbed that rather than finding God-fearing Scottish Gaelic speaking sheep herders who refuse to even count votes in elections on Sundays - as happened in this year's EU elections in Britain - they instead find minarets and Arabic speaking darkies with their wives walking ten paces behind them in burkas.

Even the Outer Hebrides are becoming Islamified.
 

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