Dog tooth found near Stonehenge 'evidence of earliest journey' in Britain


Blackleaf
#1
Taking the dog for a walk seems like a tradition as old as time itself.

But now we are one step closer to finding out exactly when the special connection between a man and his dog began.

Archaeologists have found evidence of the oldest known ‘walkies’. And not only was it roughly 7,500 years ago, but it was also an epic 250 miles...

How we've been walking the dog for 7,500 years: Discovery of tooth near Stonehenge shows animals accompanied humans as they travelled around the country


A tooth belonging to a dog dating back 7,500 years has been discovered

It was found in the grounds of a nursing home just a mile from Stonehenge

Researchers say it points to the early connections between man and dog

By Colin Fernandez Science Correspondent For The Daily Mail
7 October 2016

Taking the dog for a walk seems like a tradition as old as time itself.

But now we are one step closer to finding out exactly when the special connection between a man and his dog began.

Archaeologists have found evidence of the oldest known ‘walkies’. And not only was it roughly 7,500 years ago, but it was also an epic 250 miles.

A tooth belonging to a domesticated dog thought to resemble an Alsatian has been found in the grounds of a nursing home a mile from Stonehenge.


A tooth belonging to a domesticated dog thought to resemble an Alsatian from 7,500 years ago has been found in the grounds of a nursing home a mile from Stonehenge

Analysis reveals that the dog was originally from the Vale of York.

For the tooth to be found at Blick Mead, Wiltshire, means it must have accompanied humans to the site during the Mesolithic era.

This was 2,000 years before the big stone monuments were erected at Stonehenge. Bones also found at the site – gnawed by dogs – include those of an auroch, a type of huge, aggressive cow.

Other bones found nearby show the dog would have feasted on salmon, trout, pike, wild pig and red deer.


The discovery adds to the weight of evidence that people came to meet in the Stonehenge area millennia before the monument was built


Bones also found at the site – gnawed by dogs – include those of an auroch (left), the ancestor of modern cattle, the last of which died in Poland in 1627


David Jacques, a senior research fellow at the University of Buckingham, said the findings were significant because archaeologists did not know people travelled such long distances.

He said it also adds to the weight of evidence that people came to meet in the Stonehenge area millennia before the monument was built.

Previous excavations at the site uncovered a slate tool from Wales and stone tools from the Midlands and West of England.

As the Ice Age had just ended, one of the attractions of Blick Mead would have been a natural spring in which the only puce stones in the country could be found.

It would also have been relatively easy to reach because of the nearby River Avon, which was a major transport route at the time.

Burnt stones, wood and auroch bones from the site indicate that it was popular for feasting, an important ritual activity.

Mr Jacques said: ‘The fact that a dog and a group of people were coming to the area from such a long distance away further underlines just how important the place was four millennia before the circle was built.

‘Discoveries like this give us a completely new understanding of the establishment of the ritual landscape and make Stonehenge even more special than we thought we knew it was.’

He added that the population of Britain at the time is thought to have been 20,000-50,000.

He said: ‘These were small, disparate populations that needed to come together to exchange ideas and technologies.


It is thought that for the animal accompanied its human owners on the long journey from York in the north of England to the site of Blick Mead in Wiltshire, a few miles from Stonehenge

‘For these people, meeting would have been like Glastonbury mixed with Google.’

Andy Rhind-Tutt, chairman of Amesbury Museum and Heritage Trust, said: ‘These amazing discoveries at Blick Mead are writing the history books of Mesolithic Britain.

‘A dog tooth from York, a slate tool from Wales and a stone tool from the Midlands show that this wasn’t just the place to live at the end of the Ice Age, but was known by our ancestors for a long time widely across Britain. They kept coming here.’

Previous finds at the site have shown that Mesolithic man used to feast on toads’ legs.

At the time of the discovery in 2013, Mr Jacques said: ‘It would appear that thousands of years ago people were eating a Heston Blumenthal-style menu on this site.

'It consisted of toads’ legs, aurochs, wild boar and red deer with hazelnuts for main, a course of salmon and trout and finishing off with blackberries.’

A LONG WALK FOR FIDO

The finding of a fossilised canine tooth so close to Stonehenge highlights the long partnerships between man and dog.

Archaeologists believe the ancient tooth, which was found a few miles from the site of Stonehenge, is believed to have belonged to a German shepherd-like dog which lived 7,500 years ago.

It is thought that for the animal accompanied its human owners on the long journey from York in the north of England to the site of Blick Mead in Wiltshire.


A DOG'S TALE: MIGRATION AROUND THE WORLD IN BRIEF

The domestication of dogs is thought to have begun in South East Asia 33,000 years ago.

This is when grey wolves are believed to have hunted alongside ancient humans.

Around 15,000 years ago, a subset of dog ancestors started to migrate towards the Middle East and Africa, reaching Europe approximately 10,000 years ago.

Although scientists believe this dispersal was associated with the movement of humans, the first migration of the domestic dog out of South East Asia may have been self-initiated.

This may have been owing to environmental factors, such as the retreat of glaciers, which started approximately 19,000 years ago.

Dogs from one of these groups then travelled back towards northern China, where they encountered Asian dogs that had migrated from South East Asia.

These two groups interbred, before spreading to the Americas.




Read more: How humans have been walking the dog for 7,500 years | Daily Mail Online
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Last edited by Blackleaf; Oct 7th, 2016 at 07:43 AM..
 
Kreskin
+1
#2  Top Rated Post
Quote:

Analysis reveals that the dog was originally from the Vale of York

What analysis revealed that? Big claim with no explanation.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Kreskin View Post

What analysis revealed that? Big claim with no explanation.

Isotope analysis.
 
Kreskin
+1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Isotope analysis.

What would be different between York and Stonehenge in such an analysis?
 
Blackleaf
+1
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Kreskin View Post

What would be different between York and Stonehenge in such an analysis?

Oxygen isotope analysis

Wessex Archaeology Online
Posted Thu, 06/05/2008 - 12:37


Oxygen isotope map of Europe.

Carol Chenery, British Geological Survey

British Geological Survey (BGS) | A world-leading geoscience centre

Oxygen isotope analysis of dental enamel can assist in determining a person's place of origin.

Tooth enamel stores a chemical record of their owners’ childhood living environment, such as local climate and geology. Each tooth opens a window of information covering the short time of tooth enamel formation. The mineral apatite that makes up the structure of our teeth and bones is the main component of tooth enamel. Its chemical composition is primarily calcium, phosphorous and oxygen with trace amounts of other elements including strontium and lead. Of these elements the isotopes of oxygen and strontium are the strongest independent indicators we have of the local natural environment.

Nearly all of the oxygen that goes into the formation of tooth and bone comes from the water we drink and virtually all the water we drink is ultimately derived from precipitation as rain or snow.

The element oxygen has 3 different forms called isotopes, which are chemically the same, but have slightly different physical properties due to a small difference in their weight.


Carolyn Chenery using a Laser to extract oxygen from dental enamel for oxygen isotope analysis (taken by T Cullen): IPR/38-32CW British Geological Survey. © NERC. All Rights Reserved.

The oxygen isotopes ratio of the water you drink depends on the source of the water in precipitation, the distance from the coast, latitude and altitude and the local temperature of precipitation. For our purposes we are interested in the ratio of heavy (oxygen 18 ) to light (oxygen 16) isotopes. Drinking water in warm climates has more heavy isotopes (higher ratio) and in cold climates has more light isotopes (lower ratio). We can compare the oxygen isotopes ratio in teeth with that of drinking water from different regions and determine where a person might have lived, at the time their teeth formed.

Oxygen isotope analysis of dental enamel from the two burials at Amesbury indicate that the “Archer” came from a colder climate region than we find in Britain today, possibly from some where in central Europe - the dark blue-green area in the oxygen isotope map. An early formed tooth from the younger man has an oxygen isotope value that is compatible with living in southern England or Ireland but the value obtained from his wisdom tooth suggest that he may have spent his late teens in the Midlands (yellow area on the map) or north-east Scotland (mid green area on the map). However these results for the younger man do not rule out a European origin.

Visitors to this website are granted permission to access this BGS material and reproduce it for the purposes of academic research, private study and educational or instructive use only.

Oxygen isotope analysis | Wessex Archaeology


It was this technique which determined that the dog came from where York now is and which also determined that the 2,300BC Amesbury Archer, who was found buried near Stonehenge in 2002 with the greatest number of artefacts ever found in a British Bronze Age burial, came from an alpine area of central Europe.
Last edited by Blackleaf; Oct 7th, 2016 at 09:40 AM..
 
Murphy
+1
#6
Think Camilla Parker Bowles. Snaggle tooth. Old. Pagan love spell. Rituals. Druids. Stonehenge.

Stonehenge is not as old as everyone thinks. The Chas. Darwin group had it built in the 1800s.

Have you noticed that "The schitts" rhymes with Brits? Coincidence? I think not!
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Kreskin View Post

What would be different between York and Stonehenge in such an analysis?

Yes. They can pinpont where you or I have spent parts of our lives by the isotope signatures in our bones and teeth. It's highly accurate, apparently.
 
MHz
#8
If it was embedded in a human bone that would be before they were man's best friend.
 
darkbeaver
#9
They can't do any of that. We certainly have no idea of when we are. Pick a number.

Nuts and berries unt fire, nothing else maters. We're here for a good time, not a long time

The OP is complete rubbish, sensationalistic rot, the poster should be strangled with his guts or some hemp if he hasn't got any guts.

I don't believe a fukkin word you say you very short person.
 
MHz
+1
#10
Hemp is easier to tie into a secure knot, in theory. No test data available but it is a reasonable conclusion.
 
darkbeaver
#11
Bailer twine, we could sneak into his subterranian hole while he's sleeping
 
MHz
#12
Still not as good as snare wire with a couple of pull handles on the ends so when it is pulled tight you can let go as the wraps will keep the wire tight until the task is done. Anyone other than BL for some stew?? Their national dog is the bulldog, the flat face is an asset when fighting with big rats. No doubt the stew would have both kinds, this the UK after all.
 
darkbeaver
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Still not as good as snare wire with a couple of pull handles on the ends so when it is pulled tight you can let go as the wraps will keep the wire tight until the task is done. Anyone other than BL for some stew?? Their national dog is the bulldog, the flat face is an asset when fighting with big rats. No doubt the stew would have both kinds, this the UK after all.

I'll leave the messy stuff to you then, I favour a seal club myself.
 
MHz
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

Bailer twine, we could sneak into his subterranian hole while he's sleeping

Put it around the mouth of his hole and then do something that gets him to bolt out the 'door'. Sticking fingers into dark holes has a lot of things that can go wrong and very few things that can go right from said move.
Perhaps he has a favorite snack. Something with the same importance as cottage cheese, then you will get a solid bite.
I could bait him with a misplaced comma and then you come up from behind, . . . .
 
darkbeaver
#15
Earliest Journey To Britian, starring Blackleaf, I'am not convinced that hter study of these Islanders is productive, theydon't even bguild cars for fuk sake.
 
MHz
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

I'll leave the messy stuff to you then, I favour a seal club myself.

Not that I want instructions, but why use a seal as a club when a club works so much better?? You guys get a different wind out east don't you?? How much methane comes off the garbage dump in the trench??
 
darkbeaver
#17
Frozen baby seal makes a very effective club, it is temperature sensitive however. We don't get to use them as much as we used to. The shift to electronics you know.
 
MHz
+1
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

Earliest Journey To Britian, starring Blackleaf, I'am not convinced that hter study of these Islanders is productive, theydon't even bguild cars for fuk sake.

Ford is supposed to be bringing back the Bronco from Mexico. freebie from Trump. Ford should then become the only manufacturer and the Bronco would become the VW of North America. Mexico and the small car market would be for exports to other Nations including South America but the 4x4 bronco would still outsell them because it is is a heritage machine meaning parts are going to be available for 100 years and the latest updates can be ported into earlier models.
Eleventeen different models would be available from the bare bones (free) to the latest gizmos that run $100k with the electronic frame option 4 engine option.
Chevy can build the drive-line and Chrysler can do the interiors and comfort options. Ford can be the Middle man that get a certain % for admin duties. The employees are also the shareholders just so the customer is getting the best deal possible.
The Bronco line is the least important line as construction and manufacturing and processing plants will be needed to modernize the new hemp industry that will become the staple crop that carries value as food crops are grown for local consumption and that leaves a lot of fields being empty or a new industry has to be started.
Hemp is a multi use crop and it is a ground floor business so plants run by robots should be implemented where possible and planting and harvesting machines are as modern as designers can make them and that results in a product that is consistent in quality as well as production quotas. The products would have a local appeal so exporting might be 20 years down the road before there is a surplus that is even available. Ditch weed will be the short stuff for those that like it add it to their baked goods. Pun just for you DB.

Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

Frozen baby seal makes a very effective club, it is temperature sensitive however. We don't get to use them as much as we used to. The shift to electronics you know.

How do you get them to die in the most useful position? The year we tried it they were all contorted into all sorts of shapes that made holding on hard let alone getting a good hard swing in.

Wet noodle effect?? I can see where that would have more than just one drawback if the fight lasted any length of time.

A club built into what looks like a cuddly baby seal?? hmmm You might be onto something, just in time for X-mas too.
 
darkbeaver
#19
fortunately I have spernt years developeing baby seal freezing tech,

I work in the organic weapons industry, pumpkins are the present balistic organic we're stuudying, a guy frum NS holds the pumpkin solution records, these thinhgs are huge and destructive, organic war, we lead the market. Weapons growth. We will shower youn with raddishes, completely destroyingh you4r rice based miliatry industtrial farm.
 
MHz
+1
#20
The 2cm radish is supposed to quite painful. Personally I prefer horseradish in their handsoap and then pump in some gas to make their eyes itchy. All is fair in war.
 
darkbeaver
#21
Organic Warfare, it's time is near,

the perfect ballistic raddish is in developem,ent, promising,results, the data looks good, they should be fresh for best penetration.

High velocity wooden bullets, just arround the corner.

Green Artilary, call us for details.
 
Blackleaf
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

Earliest Journey To Britian, starring Blackleaf, I'am not convinced that hter study of these Islanders is productive, theydon't even bguild cars for fuk sake.

1.6 million cars were produced in Britain in 2015.

Quote: Originally Posted by Murphy View Post

Think Camilla Parker Bowles. Snaggle tooth. Old. Pagan love spell. Rituals. Druids. Stonehenge.

Stonehenge is not as old as everyone thinks. The Chas. Darwin group had it built in the 1800s.

Have you noticed that "The schitts" rhymes with Brits? Coincidence? I think not!

Stonehenge was constructed from 3000 BC to 2000 BC. The surrounding circular earth bank and ditch, which constitute the earliest phase of the monument, have been dated to about 3100 BC. Radiocarbon dating suggests that the first bluestones were raised between 2400 and 2200 BC, although they may have been at the site as early as 3000 BC. Stonehenge has been a legally protected Scheduled Ancient Monument since 1882 when legislation to protect historic monuments was first successfully introduced in Britain.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge