No One Whittles Anymore

Spade
+2
#1
Everyone had a jack knife. When we weren't making whistles from the willow branches along the river, we were whittling strips from sticks we would pick up in the vacant lots. It was great fun - high culture for us prairie boys. But, sadly, no one whittles anymore.

Why? Maybe it's immigration? Them furners never whittled.
 
Kreskin
+4
#2
I just do it online. Whittle away time.
 
Spade
+3
#3
What do you do with the shavings? They'd be virtually everywhere,
 
gopher
+1
#4
as a kid I tried to whittle but always bungled every project I tried







seems like there were dozens of books on the subject back then but none worked for me, sad to say
 
Cannuck
+1
#5
Never whittled in my life. Couldn't sit long enough.
 
gopher
+5
#6  Top Rated Post
There was a time when young boys would be given Swiss army knives for their birthdays and those could be used for whittling. Today in this era of political correctness such things are viewed as too violent and nobody gives them to their sons anymore. Maybe that's why the hobby is no longer done.
 
Spade
+2
#7
In spring, we'd cut sheets of bark off the birches and with a few whittled gunwhales and thwarts we would make small canoes,. We'd sail them in the swift meltwater flowing in the ditches, through culverts, to the outskirts where the meadowlarks watched from fence posts.
.

Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

There was a time when young boys would be given Swiss army knives for their birthdays and those could be used for whittling. Today in this era of political correctness such things are viewed as too violent and nobody gives them to their sons anymore. Maybe that's why the hobby is no longer done.

We would play mumble-de-peg by the hour. A knife was pocket jewellery.
 
gopher
+4
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Spade View Post

In spring, we'd cut sheets of bark off the birches and with a few whittled gunwhales and thwarts we would make small canoes,. We'd sail them in the swift meltwater flowing in the ditches, through culverts, to the outskirts where the meadowlarks watched from fence posts.
.



Wow! I had forgotten that we used to make little boats out of tree barks and put them on the water in Prospect Park, Brooklyn. Of course, my creations did not sail too far unless it was under the surface - but at least I tried!
 
bill barilko
+1
#9
There are woodworking clubs around doing much the same thing one has a booth @ the Steveston Market in summer.
 
Dexter Sinister
+3
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Spade View Post

But, sadly, no one whittles anymore.

Hey, *I* do. I never go anywhere without a jacknife in my right front pocket, except when I'm flying somewhere, then it's in my checked baggage, but as soon as I get where I'm going it's back where it belongs. It's one of the smaller Swiss Army knives, big blade, small blade, bottle opener, can opener, cork screw, awl, file, screwdriver, and tiny scissors. Never know when you might have to open a heavily taped package, or break into one of those over-packaged bits of tech gear in a hard bubble wrap...or stab somebody. I don't think I've ever been on a shoreline where I didn't idly pick up some piece of driftwood and start whittling at it. I've even bought expensive power tools to take whittling to another level. Table saw, band saw, mitre saw, jointer, planer, lathe, they're all in my garage, and they're all about making shapes in wood that please me. And that's whittling.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#11



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0ftnHrzBYY
 
Tecumsehsbones
#12
Whittle a lot. Once, in a fit of native pride, I chipped out a stone knife and whittled with that. Gave me a real appreciation of steel. Now I whittle with. . . a stone knife (well, technically zirconium oxide).
 
arob
+1
#13
scrimshaw is down too
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by arob View Post

scrimshaw is down too

That's the result of the switch from whale oil to petroleum. Can't really do good scrimshaw on refinery waste.
 
Spade
+2
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by arob View Post

scrimshaw is down too

Maybe not along the Ivory Coast. And, ever since coal-oil lamps disappeared, girls don't sit quietly in the evening embroidering doilies. Sad that.

Back to whittling. When I was three, my grandfather gave me a hatchet. I would pick up old brick in the yard that had tumbled off the chimney. Sitting on the stoop, I would chip away at the brick reducing it to orange powder. Nearly chopped off a finger when I missed a small piece of brick I was holding. Great fun, Lots of blood. Still proud of the scar.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Spade View Post

Back to whittling.

Great, let's get back to whittling.

Quote:

When I was three, my grandfather gave me a hatchet. I would pick up old brick in the yard that had tumbled off the chimney. Sitting on the stoop, I would chip away at the brick reducing it to orange powder. Nearly chopped off a finger when I missed a small piece of brick I was holding. Great fun, Lots of blood. Still proud of the scar.

Or not. Whatever.
 
Cliffy
+3
#17
Now people whittle with chainsaws:

 
EagleSmack
+1
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Spade View Post


Back to whittling. When I was three, my grandfather gave me a hatchet. I would pick up old brick in the yard that had tumbled off the chimney. Sitting on the stoop, I would chip away at the brick reducing it to orange powder. Nearly chopped off a finger when I missed a small piece of brick I was holding. Great fun, Lots of blood. Still proud of the scar.

Extreme Whittling.
 
Spade
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

Extreme Whittling.

Classic whittling at 21:20

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYbdFDmPWX4
 
Ludlow
+1
#20
Seem some fine wood carving in my day. Never was good at it meself only good at carving my fingers.
 
Spade
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Ludlow View Post

Seem some fine wood carving in my day. Never was good at it meself only good at carving my fingers.

Hard yes, but some say granite is harder.
 
Cliffy
+1
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Spade View Post

Hard yes, but some say granite is harder.

I prefer soap stone myself. Have spent many an hour inhaling that fine dust before I found out it causes silicosis.
 
gopher
+2
#23
folks here prefer to carve ice during the winter months - big hobby in Gopherland

 
CDNBear
+1
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Spade View Post

Everyone had a jack knife. When we weren't making whistles from the willow branches along the river, we were whittling strips from sticks we would pick up in the vacant lots. It was great fun - high culture for us prairie boys. But, sadly, no one whittles anymore.

Why? Maybe it's immigration? Them furners never whittled.

For starters, schools have banned pocket knives. Some cops treat them like concealed weapons, and finally, soccer moms worry the bubble wrap babies will get a boo boo.

Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Now people whittle with chainsaws:

One of my closest friends and hunting buddies does that for a living. We sometimes collaborate on projects, I provide the iron work.
 
SLM
+1
#25
It would be nice if children were taught more about safe handling of everyday items, such as knives, that are also very useful tools. You know, instead of this 'prohibit everything' mindset that is so prevalent today.

Besides which that one kid with the eye patch served a role as a valuable lesson to the rest of us kids.
 
CDNBear
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by SLM View Post

It would be nice if children were taught more about safe handling of everyday items, such as knives, that are also very useful tools. You know, instead of this 'prohibit everything' mindset that is so prevalent today.

My kids carry pocket knives, have hunting knives, and have been proficient with firearms, weapons and weapons safety since they were strong enough to lift them, respectively.

But I hate bubble wrap, and believe said tools serve a purpose in society.

Quote:

Besides which that one kid with the eye patch served a role as a valuable lesson to the rest of us kids.

And lawn darts weeded out the poor genes.
 
SLM
+1
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

My kids carry pocket knives, have hunting knives, and have been proficient with firearms, weapons and weapons safety since they were strong enough to lift them, respectively.

But I hate bubble wrap, and believe said tools serve a purpose in society.

Of course they serve a purpose, a knife of all things, even if one doesn't hunt and fish. It should be a parents responsibility, Even just basic kitchen handling of knives is freaking scary to sometimes watch a kid who is helping out in the kitchen for the first time when they don't really know how to hold it and use it properly.

Quote:

And lawn darts weeded out the poor genes.

Darwin is having a difficult time handing out awards these days, thank you so much overprotective parents and medical science.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by SLM View Post

It would be nice if children were taught more about safe handling of everyday items, such as knives, that are also very useful tools. You know, instead of this 'prohibit everything' mindset that is so prevalent today.

Besides which that one kid with the eye patch served a role as a valuable lesson to the rest of us kids.

Kids today need stronger lessons to get through to them. Columbine, Red Lake, Sandy Hook, that sort of thing.
 
SLM
+1
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Kids today need stronger lessons to get through to them. Columbine, Red Lake, Sandy Hook, that sort of thing.

And once again, learn to using a paring knife=jumping off a cliff.
 
spaminator
+3
#30