Fast-charging stations for electric vehicles coming to Trans-Canada Highway


mentalfloss
#1
Terrible, terrible news...if you're an oil lobbyist.




Fast-charging stations for electric vehicles coming to Trans-Canada Highway

Three companies are teaming up with the federal government to install 34 electric vehicle fast-charging stations along the Trans-Canada Highway in an attempt to encourage the adoption of zero-emission vehicles.

The $17.3-million charging network, which will be installed in Ontario and Manitoba, will allow drivers to charge their zero-emission cars in about 20 minutes through stations powered by a lithium-ion battery storage system, one its developers say won’t stress the utility grid.

The project is funded by an $8-million “repayable contribution” from Natural Resources Canada under the Canadian Energy Innovation Program, as well as private investment from eCAMION, a Toronto-based energy storage system developer, Leclanché, an energy storage provider, and Geneva-based power producer SGEM.

Jim Carr, the federal Minister of Natural Resources, said in a news release that government recognizes that electric vehicles will play a significant role in reducing emissions from the transportation sector.

“With more electric vehicles becoming available, we want to make them an easy choice for Canadians. The strategic investment brings us closer to having a national coast-to-coast network of electric vehicle charging stations while growing our economy and creating good jobs for Canada’s middle-class,” Carr said.

Industry experts and government leaders have agreed that developing and installing charging infrastructure around the country is crucial in order to spark electric vehicle sales in Canada.

Each new station will consist of an energy storage system that uses large-format lithium-ion batteries and multiple outlets so that several cars can be charged at once. The stations will be equipped to use Level 3 chargers, which typically use a 480-volt system that can fully charge electric vehicles in about 30 minutes. Level 2 chargers, found in homes and commonly seen in parking garages, use a 240-volt system and can fully recharge vehicles in about eight to 10 hours.

Bryan Urban, executive vice president with Leclanché North America, said the technology is particularly advantageous because it will not stress the grid or require significant infrastructure upgrades.

“As electric vehicles get faster in the charging process, that can have a lot of stress on the grid and you would need to beef up the system, particularly in areas that are more remote. That can be costly,” he said.

“But this way, you can charge multiple vehicles at a time, without stressing the grid.”

The battery sources would be recharged during off-peak times, according to the companies. Urban also said several stations will be outfitted with solar panels to recharge the battery.

“This is perhaps the largest infrastructure project for electrical vehicles to be deployed at one time anywhere in the world,” said Elad Barak, VP business development of eCAMION, in a statement.

Fast-charging stations for electric vehicles coming to Trans-Canada Highway | Financial Post
 
TenPenny
+1
#2
Coming to the trans Canada highway in a very limited area.
 
mentalfloss
#3
That's your argument?
 
TenPenny
+2
#4
Argument? No wonder you have trouble on here. It was a comment, not an argument.


You're just not very bright.
 
mentalfloss
#5
 
justlooking
#6
And the fast charge reduces the battery life by how much ?

Imagine, going coast to coast in 4 days, and then shucking out another 5 grand for new batteries.
 
mentalfloss
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by justlooking View Post

Imagine, going coast to coast in 4 days


 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#8
Which is good news I hope not to many electric cars get stranded between charging systems. Just a side question how much carbon would be emitted into the atmosphere on the manufacturing of these giant Lithium batteries, I thought I read somewhere that the carbon emitted by the manufacturing of the Lithium battery will never be recovered in the life of the battery, but I guess at least it isn't that horrid carbon based fuel
Last edited by Twin_Moose; Jul 21st, 2017 at 12:53 PM..Reason: clarification
 
mentalfloss
#9
I'm sure there is some kind of calculus to determine a net benefit when factoring in car use.

A carbon price also incentivizes companies to refine their manufacturing process.
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#10
Love the idea.. you see electric vehicles all over Los Angeles..

Owning a Tesla is like owning a BMW or Porsche a new status symbol
 
justlooking
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

I thought I read somewhere that the carbon emitted by the manufacturing of the Lithium battery will never be recovered in the life of the battery,


What ?
Oh no, you cannot actually try to challenge the virtue signaling grass munchers that their precious
lookatmelookhowenvironmentaliam toy actually creates more damage than it stops.

That's just not cool.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#12
34 stations across 1 highway covering the whole country? Where will the 35th vehicle charge? And can you actually drive from one station to the next without running out of juice?

And how much government $ will go into subsidizing this 'venture'?
 
DaSleeper
+2
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

34 stations across 1 highway covering the whole country? Where will the 35th vehicle charge? And can you actually drive from one station to the next without running out of juice?

And how much government $ will go into subsidizing this 'venture'?

Quote:

Three companies are teaming up with the federal government to install 34 electric vehicle fast-charging stations along the Trans-Canada Highway in an attempt to encourage the adoption of zero-emission vehicles.

Code word for fully subsidized
 
MHz
+1
#14
CN Rail should be come mobile charging stations.
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
+2
#15
Powered but nuclear power stations in Ontario. Somehow that is good for the environment. But then the majority of the anti oil crowd are just shills for the nuke industry preying on gullible like flossy.
 
White_Unifier
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Powered but nuclear power stations in Ontario. Somehow that is good for the environment. But then the majority of the anti oil crowd are just shills for the nuke industry preying on gullible like flossy.

If I had to choose between an oil leak and a nuclear meltdown, hmmmm.....

Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

Code word for fully subsidized

Either that of the government contracted out to them. Either way though, the taxpayer pays for it. But if it's the latter, at least we get something for it since the stations would be state-owned. If the companies are just subsidized, then they keep it. If the state owns it, at least it can sell it and make some money off of it.

But personally, I say raise the carbon tax and let the market figure it out.
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
+1
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

If I had to choose between an oil leak and a nuclear meltdown, hmmmm.....

Easy to turn off the tap on an oil pipe. Apparently nukes keep polluting even after they blow up. Fukushima has polluted the BC coast and is still pumping out thousands of gallons of polluted water every day.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#18


[I live less than a mile from that sign. It's huge. I watched the workmen putting it up and the rear windows on that car are the full height of a man.]
 
White_Unifier
+1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Easy to turn off the tap on an oil pipe. Apparently nukes keep polluting even after they blow up. Fukushima has polluted the BC coast and is still pumping out thousands of gallons of polluted water every day.

And you can get close to an oil spill. To approach a nuclear leak is suicide at best. Sure we can send in robots, yet the radiation affects even their circuitry.

Just look at the photos from Chernobyl. Photographic technology was actually quite advanced even then, yet the photos are fuzzy because the radiation was eating into the cameras.

I think at lest one robot malfunctioned at Fukushima too. They sent it in to explore and it didn't take long for the radiation to ravage it.
 
Walter
#20
Fake news.
 
White_Unifier
+1
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Fake news.

Sorry Walter, but I'm not in the mood to run around the net finding the links for your right now.
 
Bar Sinister
No Party Affiliation
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Which is good news I hope not to many electric cars get stranded between charging systems. Just a side question how much carbon would be emitted into the atmosphere on the manufacturing of these giant Lithium batteries,

Interesting. I wonder the same thing about the extraction and processing of oil.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Bar Sinister View Post

Interesting. I wonder the same thing about the extraction and processing of oil.

But if you are low on fuel, there is likely a gas station close by. And if you do run out, you can walk with a gas can to the next one or call CAA. Electric ones your only choice would be a tow truck or to carry a real long extention cord.
 
petros
+1
#24
20 minutes for a limited charge. Still too long when winter can kill you in 5 minutes.
 
mentalfloss
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post



[I live less than a mile from that sign. It's huge. I watched the workmen putting it up and the rear windows on that car are the full height of a man.]

It certainly is a massive endorsement by Ford.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

20 minutes for a limited charge. Still too long when winter can kill you in 5 minutes.

Stop sticking your tongue to the flag pole, for Gawd sakes.
 
Jinentonix
No Party Affiliation
+3
#27  Top Rated Post
Hilarious. Two provinces make up Canada and there'll be 34 charging stations between them? Christ, how efficient ARE these piece of crap EVs? I could drive from North Bay to the other side of Manitoba on two, maybe three tanks of gas. Are there even 34 gas stations along that stretch of the Trans-Canada?

Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Which is good news I hope not to many electric cars get stranded between charging systems. Just a side question how much carbon would be emitted into the atmosphere on the manufacturing of these giant Lithium batteries, I thought I read somewhere that the carbon emitted by the manufacturing of the Lithium battery will never be recovered in the life of the battery,

Not quite. For example, if you buy a Tesla you'd have to drive the car for 8 years before it became carbon neutral.
 
mentalfloss
#28
The POT really doesn't like this news lol
 
petros
#29
Why?

Do people of thought scare you?
 
Decapoda
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Hilarious. Two provinces make up Canada and there'll be 34 charging stations between them? Christ, how efficient ARE these piece of crap EVs? I could drive from North Bay to the other side of Manitoba on two, maybe three tanks of gas. Are there even 34 gas stations along that stretch of the Trans-Canada?

Not quite. For example, if you buy a Tesla you'd have to drive the car for 8 years before it became carbon neutral.

If you're lucky...

People need to do a bit of research and realize that nothing is free and everything has an environmental impact. EV's are no exception. People get all self-righteous and think that their saving the planet with their Prius, but they're only fooling themselves.

Tesla might be worse for the environment than a gas car.

"The global warming potential for EVs that rely on natural gas – generally considered to be the cleanest fossil fuel – show an improvement of only 12 percent over gasoline, and break even with diesel.

Most alarming, EVs that depend on coal for their electricity are actually 17 percent to 27 percent worse than diesel or gas engines. That is especially bad for the United States, because we derive close to 45 percent of our electricity from coal. In states like Texas, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, that number is much closer to 100 percent."

https://www.wired.com/2016/03/teslas...t-green-think/

"In the Jiangxi rare earth mine in China, Abraham writes, workers dig eight-foot holes and pour ammonium sulfate into them to dissolve the sandy clay. Then they haul out bags of muck and pass it through several acid baths; what’s left is baked in a kiln, leaving behind the rare earths required by everything from our phones to our Teslas. At this mine, those rare earths amounted to 0.2 percent of what gets pulled out of the ground. The other 99.8 percent—now contaminated with toxic chemicals—is dumped back into the environment. That damage is difficult to quantify, just like the impact of oil drilling."


With regards to this program being rolled out in Canada, the link above states how the charging stations will be paid for, but my question is who pays for the electricity these things will be gobbling up? Nothing's free.

All one has to do is acknowledge the amount of Government subsidy that's going into trying to popularize EV's to see that this is all about politics and optics, and has zero to do with the environment. But then again, optic seem to be what it's all about these days, real solutions be damned.