Cheapest fully electric vehicle coming to Canada soon


mentalfloss
#1
Cheapest fully electric vehicle coming to Canada soon

For a relatively tiny car company, Mitsubishi is forging ahead with an ambitious electrification plan that puts it close to the forefront of the burgeoning electric car movement.

Judging from the 2012 i-MiEV fully electric hatchback set to arrive in Canada in December, it’s clear the company does not have the disposable research or materials budgets that plug-in leaders GM and Nissan do to pour into this expensive area. But what it does offer is North America’s first “entry-level” EV: the least expensive fully electric vehicle, to start at about 25 grand after provincial rebates in Ontario and Quebec, where the bulk of initial Canadian EV sales are expected.

Twenty-five large, zero tailpipe emissions (or tailpipes), near zero driving noise and never having to care about the price of gas is an enticing proposition. Granted, this is the i-MiEV’s starting price after provincial tax rebates of $8,230 in Ontario, and $7,850 in Quebec, and before sales taxes and the $1,450 freight charge.

Consumers in other provinces are looking at a starting price of $32,998 for the (very) base car, or $35,998 once you include the highly desirable Premium package. The provincial governments of British Columbia and Manitoba are also very active in the electric vehicle sphere, and are both considering their own plug-in incentives, but nothing is official yet.

Then there’s the one big caveat: the i-MiEV will realistically only give you about 100 km worth of driving before it needs a long electricity fill-up. And the majority of my colleagues on this launch experienced a healthy dose of range anxiety, and that includes some Mitsu Canada folks, in a day’s worth of driving.

But first the cost question, since it is a key but complicated one with battery EVs. Whatever your province, the i-MiEV commands a hefty price premium compared to similar-sized subcompact gas-powered vehicles. Especially once potential buyers factor in a $2,000 or so home charger, which in Canada is a must-have for any BEV owner. Buyers in Quebec are also eligible for money back on their home charger installation, up to $1,000.

I’d argue the Premium package – which adds Bluetooth, USB, steering wheel stereo controls and a GPS system for $3,000 – is a must-have as well. The package’s large colour touch screen adds a much-needed high-tech touch to what is a painfully plain econo-car interior.

Where everyone will save money is in refuelling costs. Although the actual electricity rate you pay will depend on a multitude of factors (which province you live in, time of use rates in some areas), Canada averages about $0.10 per kilowatt-hour. Enter the U.S. government’s super handy and metric-friendly fueleconomy.gov site. It allows us to change the cost of fuel from their laughable $0.927/litre default to a more realistic for us $1.25 and $1.35/litre for regular and premium, respectively, and then compare it to our average electricity rate as well with the i-MiEV.

Using these figures, an i-MiEV would cost $447 to run 24,000 kilometres, about a year’s worth of driving for the average Canadian commuter, compared to $2,139 for the similarly sized subcompact Hyundai Accent hatchback. And against the best-selling car in Canada for the past 13 years, the also new Honda Civic? It would cost $2,205 to cover the same distance, or almost five times as much to fuel, using these approximate figures.

Mitsubishi and most industry watchers say the cost of maintenance will also be much lower, since the car doesn’t have many of the parts that need regular upkeep: engine oil, filter, spark plugs, transmission, exhaust system, fan belt – the list goes on and on. No estimate yet on how much less this could work out to, and we likely won’t know until owners start blogging about living with one, after deliveries set to start in early January.

Cheapest fully electric vehicle coming to Canada soon - The Globe and Mail
 
petros
#2
Does it have a good heater?
 
mentalfloss
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Does it have a good heater?

Thy best.
 
#juan
+1
#4  Top Rated Post
The most important question was not asked. How far wiill it go on a fresh charge?
 
mentalfloss
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

The most important question was not asked. How far wiill it go on a fresh charge?

>100 km.
 
lone wolf
#6
How far with the electric heat turned on?
 
Liberalman
#7
In Canada’s cold weather the electric car does not do to well good for a summer car just like a motorbike
 
petros
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

How far with the electric heat turned on?

10km
 
#juan
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

How far with the electric heat turned on?

Presumably it will not go quite as far on a cold morning with the heat on. Batteries don't put out as much energy
when they are cold and the added heating load would take a bit of that range away as well. Still, it sounds like the car would do for most commuting to work and back.
 
mentalfloss
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

10km

You should stop making it a habit of being completely wrong about everything.

It should be around 70 km in the coldest temperatures.

This is why it's so important to invest in an energy infrastructure.
 
petros
#11
70km? Wow that's a long ways. To KFC and back.
 
#juan
#12
Before I retired I was driving about 70 kms per day commuting to and from work with one passenger. If this car will do that, it will have my vote.
 
TenPenny
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Liberalman View Post

In Canada’s cold weather the electric car does not do to well good for a summer car just like a motorbike



And that comment would be based on what, exactly? You've owned an electric car, and had several years' experience with it?
 
B00Mer
#14
I'd buy one, Vancouver does not get that cold in the winter and locally, it's a cheap ride.. other than the $32,000 price tag.

I wonder if they installed a solar panel on the roof it it would increase range??
 
petros
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

I wonder if they installed a solar panel on the roof it it would increase range??

Hell no.
 
#juan
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

I'd buy one, Vancouver does not get that cold in the winter and locally, it's a cheap ride.. other than the $32,000 price tag.

I wonder if they installed a solar panel on the roof it it would increase range??

Couldn't hurt. I don't know at this point whether the addition of a solar panel would be cost efective but every little bit helps.
 
B00Mer
#17
This is great for Canada, the electricity is fairly cheap in Canada, in the USA the electricity is far more expensive..

In Canada I pay $57/mo, in the USA $128/mo.. same size home.
 
Liberalman
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny View Post

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And that comment would be based on what, exactly? You've owned an electric car, and had several years' experience with it?

Toronto has electric buses that it is getting rid of in favour of diesal electric ones for the reason is that the electric ones because for no reason it stops working in real cold weather midway through the route and passengers have to wait for another bus while the electric one gets towed back to the bus yards
 
mentalfloss
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

Before I retired I was driving about 70 kms per day commuting to and from work with one passenger. If this car will do that, it will have my vote.

The mileage will get better with every year. You'll have people who have short commutes in provinces like Ontario and Quebec getting the early buy-in for the 8K rebate. As demand increases, we'll begin building the infrastructure to match.
 
lone wolf
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

This is great for Canada, the electricity is fairly cheap in Canada, in the USA the electricity is far more expensive..

In Canada I pay $57/mo, in the USA $128/mo.. same size home.

In Ontario, I pay $136/mo for 920 sq ft....
 
petros
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

The mileage will get better with every year. You'll have people who have short commutes in provinces like Ontario and Quebec getting the early buy-in for the 8K rebate. As demand increases, we'll begin building the infrastructure to match.

You've got money for rebates and infrastructure?
 
DaSleeper
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

You've got money for rebates and infrastructure?

Makes me wonder how much of the taxpayer's subsidizing them solar panel farms and wind farms caused those increases in electric bills in Ontario????
 
petros
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

Makes me wonder how much of the taxpayer's subsidizing them solar panel farms and wind farms caused those increases in electric bills in Ontario????

Money doesn't grow on trees. My electric bill shot through the roof to pay for carbon capture so we don't need to import CO2 to extract even more oil.
 
DaSleeper
#24
We must find a way to redistribute that wealth comrade
 
L Gilbert
#25
Cool. Mitsubishi has some pretty good technology.
battery technology is always improving, also.
Not only that but if there's a generator, going down some hills will also recharge the batteries. Could also hide a wind generator underneath somewhere as well as having a solar panel of two on the body. Besides, an electric 4WD would be cool because you could actually have 4 wheel independent drive without a lot of weight spent on diffs, trannies, engines, etc. and if you place the batteries well, they'd be near the wheels for decent traction and weight distribution.

hehe Maybe use captured CO
² for a vehicle that runs on it.
 
petros
#26
Is it "Green"?
 
MHz
#27
Just out of curiosity, say i got one and I wanted to go cross country could I build my own charger that was powered by a single cylinder high efficiency diesel engine attached to a high capacity charger and put it into a tiny package that I could tow behind the pure electric vehicle.

NG would be great for Canada if you could fill up at home. (and some upgrades that save you fuel while sitting in the long line at a Timmy's)

I'm quite sure cities can manage their traffic lights a lot better than they do most of the time. (or an engine that powers way down when idling)
 
B00Mer
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

In Ontario, I pay $136/mo for 920 sq ft....

yeah, but Ontario is broke.. you're subsiding your Provinces debt via taxes.

cheaper in Alberta & BC..

I keep telling my family to leave Ontario before Quebec owns it..
 
MHz
#29
Does Quebec ship power to Ontario and mark it up like they do with the power they get from NFLD and sell to NY? How the did that ever get passed (allowed to remain in place) after it was know what they did?
 
petros
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

NG would be great for Canada if you could fill up at home. (and some upgrades that save you fuel while sitting in the long line at a Timmy's)