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An intricately carved oak bed once dumped in a hotel car park has been revealed by DNA testing as the likely place where Henry VIII was conceived.

The testing was undertaken by DoubleHelix, a DNA testing firm in Singapore which applied a method normally used to detect illegal wood logging.

This revealed that the wood was oak from central Europe and the paint contained ultramarine, a pigment more precious than gold when the bed was crafted.

Henry VII's elaborate four-post marriage bed that was once dumped in a hotel car park is finally confirmed as the real deal after DNA testing proves it is not a Victorian forgery


German DNA testing technique firms the oak wood originates from Tudor times

The bed was once dumped in a hotel car park and bought online for £2,000

An antiques dealer restored it and spent nine years proving it isn't Victorian

Henry VIII may have been conceived in the bed and shared it with Ann Boleyn

By Yuan Ren For Mailonline
12 February 2019

An intricately carved oak bed once dumped in a hotel car park has been revealed by DNA testing as the likely place where Henry VIII was conceived.

The testing was undertaken by DoubleHelix, a DNA testing firm in Singapore which applied a method normally used to detect illegal wood logging.

This revealed that the wood was oak from central Europe and the paint contained ultramarine, a pigment more precious than gold when the bed was crafted.

The oak bed had been in the honeymoon suite of a hotel in Chester for 15 years before it was discarded and subsequently rescued by an antiques dealer.


An intricately carved oak bed once dumped in a hotel car park has been revealed by DNA testing as the likely place where Henry VIII was conceived. The bed is described as measuring nine-feet tall, and six feet long.

Antiques dealer Ian Coulson, who has restored hundreds of such beds over the years, bought the bed online for £2,200 ($2,800) in 2010, with no idea it would turn out to be historically significant.

The bed had been left to wither in a hotel carpark in Chester, after which Mr Coulson bought it and proceeded to restore the astonishing find.

Mr Coulson told National Geographic last week: 'At that stage I thought it was a supreme example of the Arts and Craft movement,' referring to a a design popular in Victorian England in the 1800s.

But Mr Coulson would research his suspicions for the next nine years, during which various tests were carried out to show the bed dates from the Tudor period as is an original.


DNA testing was undertaken by a DNA Helix, a DNA testing firm in Singapore applied a method normally used to detect illegal wood logging



The Langely Collection that now owns the bed calls it 'The First State Bed of Henry VII & Elizabeth of York' on their website and dates it to between October 1485 and January 1486


Henry VII (pictured) was declared king and he was officially crowned at a coronation ceremony on 30 October 1485. As the first king of the Tudors, he reigned for nearly 24 years before being peacefully succeeded by his son, Henry VIII


The Langely Collection that now owns the bed calls it 'The First State Bed of Henry VII & Elizabeth of York' on their website and dates it to between October 1485 and January 1486.

The bed is described as measuring nine-feet tall, and six feet long.

Scientists were previously unsuccessful at carbon dating the oak wood due to the varnishing.

Attempts at dendrochronology, a process to work out its age by examining the rings in the wood, could not yield conclusive results.

The technology for extracting DNA from wood samples used in its latest DNA test was developed by Germany's Thünen Institute of Forest Genetics and usually used to detect illegal logging.

The test showed that the wood is not American White Oak which would have placed the bed in the Victorian age and made it a copy of a Tudor antique.


Scientists were previously unsuccessful at carbon dating the oak wood due to the varnishing. Attempts at dendrochronology, a process to work out its age by examining the rings in the wood, could not yield conclusive results

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...A-testing.html