UK Gov In Turmoil & Bexit Mess.


Blackleaf
#481
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

the backstop is not gone.

Says who?
 
Hoid
#482
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/18/john...-suggests.html

Boris's deal actually worse for the British economy than May's was.

Who knew that was even possible.

A bad plan poorly executed.
 
Hoid
#483
Says the deal.

Give it a read.

IN 4 years the Irish can vote themselves back into the EU customs zone - which they obviously will, given the devastation to the British economy.
 
Blackleaf
#484
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/18/john...-suggests.html
Boris's deal actually worse for the British economy than May's was.
Who knew that was even possible.
A bad plan poorly executed.

 
Hoid
#485
^does not even know what is in the agreement
 
Blackleaf
#486
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Says the deal.

Well that's funny. The media seems to be of the opinion that Boris has got rid of the backstop. It really is amazing that you've found differently.
 
Hoid
#487
what is funny is that you have to reply on the media for your information - because you are too lazy/stupid to actually do the reading yourself.
 
Blackleaf
#488
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

^does not even know what is in the agreement









 
Blackleaf
#489
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

what is funny is that you have to reply on the media for your information - because you are too lazy/stupid to actually do the reading yourself.

How else did you expect me to know Boris has got rid of the backstop? Telepathy?
 
Hoid
#490
You clearly are not able to make decisions for yourself

interesting that you are a Brexit supporter
 
Blackleaf
#491
EU is a collection of fading, failing economies – Brexiteer George Galloway, former leader of the Respect Party

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAN_eL66usw
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#492
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

EU is a collection of fading, failing economies – Brexiteer George Galloway, former leader of the Respect Party
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAN_eL66usw

... and Britain is mighty,isit?

It's mighty post-industrial, that's for sure.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#493
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

... and Britain is mighty,isit?
It's mighty post-industrial, that's for sure.

It's better off out of the EU.
 
Blackleaf
#494
STEPHEN GLOVER: Yes, Saturday was a wretched day, but I believe Boris Johnson may yet deliver

By Stephen Glover for the Daily Mail
Monday 21 Oct 2019

After the debacle of Saturday’s Commons vote, I wanted to go into a darkened room and never have to think about Brexit again. I expect millions of people felt the same.

Just when it appeared possible that MPs might vote for Boris Johnson’s deal, albeit narrowly, some damn-fool amendment was passed which has apparently had the effect of pushing us further into the mire.

How petty, out-of-touch and petulant many parliamentarians seemed.


Boris Johnson is dynamic and optimistic and knows what he wants, whereas his opponents are weak and divided and, in the case of Jeremy Corbyn, muddled and almost comically unimpressive

It was billed as a once-in-a-generation debate, yet much of the proceedings would have shamed a school debating society, though the Prime Minister’s opening statement, and Michael Gove’s closing speech, were impressive.

But easy though it is to give in to despair, I’m going to stick out my neck and express some optimism that this maddening saga could soon be over.

Or, to put it more judiciously, I don’t think the situation is as hopeless as it might seem.

Let’s look, for a moment, at the plus side. Mr Johnson closed a deal with Brussels last Thursday which many commentators and general know-alls had declared unachievable.

It’s not perfect, of course. But it’s an awful lot better than No Deal, and offers a reasonable way out of the mess we’re in.

And although the PM has unfortunately lost the support of the Democratic Unionist Party, which invariably judges what is best for Britain through the narrow prism of its own self-interest, he has reunited his own party more successfully than almost anyone imagined.

Many people (myself included) thought that if the DUP rejected his deal, many members of the hardline Tory ERG group would do the same in a spirit of solidarity. This hasn’t happened. Only a handful of ERG ultras may hold out.

That means that whether the PM’s deal is put to the test today via a so-called meaningful vote (if Speaker Bercow allows it), or tomorrow via the second reading of the Withdrawal Bill, previously warring Conservatives will rally around the same flag.


Remainer MPs will doubtless come up with all sorts of delaying tactics in what are likely to be the most momentous ten days so far in our apparently never-ending Brexit nightmare. Protesters are pictured above in an anti-Brexit demonstration on Saturday

Former disgruntled Tory Remainers such as Nick Boles and the egregious Oliver Letwin (author of Saturday’s tomfoolery) will, figuratively speaking, join hands with ERG hard nuts such as Steve Baker and Mark Francois. Theresa May never managed to pull this off. Boris has.

It’s perfectly true that, deprived of DUP support, even an almost united Tory tribe will not generate enough votes for the deal to pass. The Prime Minister will need the backing of at least a dozen pro-Leave Labour MPs. But that is not an incredible prospect.

Moreover, the EU (on which institution the Prime Minister calculatedly lavished tributes on Saturday) is not minded to give an instant response to the request for an extension which he has been forced to make by the Benn Act.


I believe the electorate will favour the leader who has demonstrated conviction and stuck to his principles, and has done his utmost to fulfil his promise of getting this country out of the EU

By the way, I think the PM got around this business rather cleverly by sending the letter he was legally obliged to compose without a signature, and accompanying it with another, which was signed, making clear he doesn’t want an extension. Labour may call it ‘childish’ but it seems pretty smart to me.

The fact is that no one can be certain the EU will grant an extension. Agreement by all 27 countries is required.

MPs who hold out against Boris’s deal will have to contend with the thought that, if Brussels doesn’t play ball, they may find themselves falling into the abyss of No Deal of which they are so terrified.

So for all these reasons, I am not as down in the dumps as I was after spending my Saturday watching MPs waste everyone’s time, including their own. But I have to admit, of course, that it will be far from plain sailing.

Even if the Government squeezes through a meaningful vote, assuming one is held, Remainer MPs will harry it as it tries to pass the legislation which must be completed if the UK is to leave the EU by October 31.

It is now certain, for example, that Labour will this week throw its weight behind an amendment in favour of a second referendum. There are rumours that the DUP – which seems to be regretting its support for Brexit – might throw in its lot with Labour, the Scot Nats and Lib Dems.

What would happen if such an amendment were passed, God alone knows.

Opposition parties are in no position to draw up the complex legislation that would be required for a second referendum, and Boris Johnson would not wish to do so. An election would surely have to follow.

Remainer MPs will doubtless come up with all sorts of delaying tactics in what are likely to be the most momentous ten days so far in our apparently never-ending Brexit nightmare.

Former disgruntled Tory Remainers such as Nick Boles and the egregious Oliver Letwin (author of Saturday¿s tomfoolery, above) will, figuratively speaking, join hands with ERG hard nuts such as Steve Baker and Mark Francois. Theresa May never managed to pull this off. Boris has
Former disgruntled Tory Remainers such as Nick Boles and the egregious Oliver Letwin (author of Saturday's tomfoolery) will, figuratively speaking, join hands with ERG hard nuts such as Steve Baker and Mark Francois. Theresa May never managed to pull this off. Boris has
Yet it seems to me that one can easily overthink potential pitfalls. The truth is that no one can be sure whether or how the Government will cope with the innumerable parliamentary difficulties that lie ahead.

But my reasons for being cautiously optimistic ultimately depend on another thought. Although Parliament is supposed to be the highest court in the land, there is in fact a higher and more important one: public opinion.

All the evidence is that in this court the Prime Minister is winning the argument with his determination to ‘get Brexit done’ by October 31.

On Saturday, this newspaper’s Survation poll suggested that 50 per cent of people wanted the Commons to approve his deal, as against 38 per cent who didn’t. Not that MPs took any notice.

Boris Johnson is dynamic and optimistic and knows what he wants, whereas his opponents are weak and divided and, in the case of Jeremy Corbyn, muddled and almost comically unimpressive. It’s no surprise the PM’s personal ratings, and those of his party, have been rising.

Sooner or later, there will have to be an election, however frightened Mr Corbyn and Labour are of one.

I believe the electorate will favour the leader who has demonstrated conviction and stuck to his principles, and has done his utmost to fulfil his promise of getting this country out of the EU.

Hard though it may be to see how Boris can avoid all the snares and ambushes of the coming days, there is reason to believe that he will finally deliver us from the hell we’re living in.
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/a...n-deliver.html
 
Hoid
#495
the hell you are living in is one of your own making.

twits
 
Blackleaf
#496
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

the hell you are living in is one of your own making.
twits

No it isn't.

It's of the Remainers' making.

Twit.
 
Hoid
#497
and the remainers aren't Brits?

**** you're stupid.
 
Blackleaf
#498
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

and the remainers aren't Brits?
**** you're stupid.

Not as stupid as you. Almost nobody on Earth is.
 
Ocean Breeze
Free Thinker
#499

Another Brexit hiccup, as House Speaker John Bercow denies Boris Johnson a vote today


The decision �� having to do with parliamentary rules �� means that Parliament would be expected to vote on the withdrawal agreement bill on Tuesday. Number crunchers say Johnson may have the votes to narrowly get it through, though amendments may complicate its passage.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...t-world&wpmk=1
 
Blackleaf
#500
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XiFguDmDNFs

The EU Says No To Brexit Extension Unless Boris Gives Good Reason.

Once again, French President Macron confirms that France and the rest of the EU council would veto any Brexit delay unless there is a good reason. This includes a short term technical extension to get the brexit deal through. Meanwhile Remainers in Parliament with Labour plan to add amendments to the withdrawal agreement bill which include second referendum and EU Customs Union. But do they have the numbers?
 
Blackleaf
#501
Quote: Originally Posted by Ocean Breeze View Post


Another Brexit hiccup, as House Speaker John Bercow denies Boris Johnson a vote today

The decision �� having to do with parliamentary rules �� means that Parliament would be expected to vote on the withdrawal agreement bill on Tuesday. Number crunchers say Johnson may have the votes to narrowly get it through, though amendments may complicate its passage.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...t-world&wpmk=1

I can't wait till that evil bastard resigns at the end of this month.
 
Blackleaf
#502
PM aims to push Brexit bill through in three days



The government has published its 110-page bill to turn Boris Johnson's Brexit deal into law.

No 10 will ask MPs on Tuesday to approve its proposals for three days of intensive debate over the Withdrawal Agreement Bill (WAB).

The PM urged MPs to back the schedule, saying: "The public doesn't want any more delays, neither do other European leaders and neither do I."

But opposition MPs said there would not be enough time to scrutinise the bill.

Repeating his calls for MPs to "get Brexit done", Mr Johnson said his deal allowed the UK to leave the EU "without disruption" and provide a "framework for a new relationship based on free trade and friendly cooperation".

"We are leaving the European Union but we will always be European," he said.

'I hope Parliament today votes to take back control for itself and the British people and the country can start to focus on the cost of living, the NHS, and conserving our environment."

Leader of the Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg said that if MPs did not back the intensive timetable it could result in the UK missing the government's 31 October Brexit deadline.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-50132790
 
Blackleaf
#503

Bercow said that he wouldn't allow a vote because Parliament had already voted on a similar motion and some arcane rule prevents the same question being put twice.

In which case, can we also expect him to stop MPs putting forward amendments calling for a second referendum and continued membership of the customs union — both of which have already been rejected?

Don't hold your breath...


The Man From Del Monte says b******s to Brexit: RICHARD LITTLEJOHN watches gurning gargoyle John Bercow block Boris Johnson's deal

By Richard Littlejohn for the Daily Mail
22 Oct 2019



To nobody's great surprise, up popped that gurning gargoyle Bercow yesterday to stymie, yet again, the latest attempt to get Brexit through the Commons.

In the name of 'democratic accountability', Mr Speaker prevented Boris Johnson's departure deal being put to a vote.

You couldn't make it up.

Frankly, it doesn't matter what excuse he fell back on this time. Bercow has bent every rule in the book to help Remainers scupper the result of the 2016 referendum.

He's like The Man From Del Monte in reverse. Readers who recall this famous TV advertising campaign from the Eighties and Nineties will know exactly what I'm getting at.

It featured a colonial fruit and vegetable buyer for a canned goods company. Kitted out in a fedora and Our Man In Havana white suit, he would be wafted to remote tropical farming districts in pursuit of the purest produce.

Nervous locals who'd spent months toiling in the fields would await the arrival of his seaplane, or chauffeur-driven limo.

After ceremoniously squeezing oranges, dissecting pineapples and sampling freshly picked tomatoes, The Man From Del Monte would pass judgment.

A thumbs down meant financial ruin, a thumbs up prosperity. Eventually, a farmer with a Viva Zapata moustache and a dodgy, Mind Your Language accent would declare, to rapturous relief:

'The Man From Del Monte, he say YES!'

If they ever revive the campaign, Bercow would be perfect for the part.

The problem would be getting him to stick to the script. Because when it comes to Brexit, The Man From Del Monte, he always say NO! It doesn't matter what ministers lay before the House, the Speaker takes a perverse delight in obstructing all attempts to take Britain out of the EU.

He was never going to permit Boris's deal to be put to a vote of MPs — especially once it became apparent that the Government might just have cobbled together enough support to get it passed.

Scaling new heights of pomposity and self-justification, Bercow blew the Government's Brexit timetable out of the water.

It's largely irrelevant which reason he plucked out of thin air. If it hadn't have been this one, it would have been another.

But bear with me for a moment. Bercow said that he wouldn't allow a vote because Parliament had already voted on a similar motion and some arcane rule prevents the same question being put twice.

In which case, can we also expect him to stop MPs putting forward amendments calling for a second referendum and continued membership of the customs union — both of which have already been rejected?

Don't hold your breath.

What really sticks in the craw is the repeated bleating of Bercow and his fellow diehard Remainers that democratic accountability demands Brexit is subject to Parliamentary scrutiny.

Don't make me laugh.

This rotten, cynical Parliament has shown nothing but contempt for democracy. Having promised to respect the referendum result, the majority of MPs have strained every sinew to overturn it.

The only reason they are insisting on Parliamentary scrutiny is because that's the best way of preventing Brexit ever happening.

I don't want to depress you, but we could be in for another three years of this. Because of the Fixed-term Parliaments Act, there needn't be another General Election until the summer of 2022.

Labour isn't going to back an election it would inevitably lose. The only way an election could be triggered is if the Government is defeated in a vote of confidence.

But the Opposition refuses to move one.

I suppose Boris could always hold a vote of confidence in himself in the hope that he'd lose, thus freeing him to go to the country. But he doesn't even have the numbers to get that through the House.

Despite agitating for a 'People's Vote', a 'confirmatory vote', the Opposition is scared stiff of letting the people decide.

Among those demanding a People's Vote are a couple of dozen MPs who have resigned from the Tory and Labour parties recently and either joined the Lib Dems, set up Change UK, or are sitting as independents.

Chucky Umunna is on his third party in the past few months.

Not a single one of them has had the decency to offer themselves back to their constituents in a 'confirmatory' by-election, even though they now represent a different political party.

So I think we can take whatever they say about a People's Vote with a shovel of Himalayan rock salt.

To be honest, I had hoped that after I'd taken a week's holiday, I would come back to find MPs had seen sense and embraced Boris's deal on Saturday.

Not that I think it is worth the paper it's written on. It's Theresa May's dismal, defeatist 'deal' on Botox — a pig in lipstick. The triumphalism we are seeing is some quarters is misplaced wishful thinking.

But it's probably the best we can expect in the circumstances. If it gets through, we might, just might, be able to pick the bones out of it later.

Having said they didn't want to leave without a deal, however, MPs then threw it out. Go figure.

What happens next? As I've written before, anyone who claims to know is a liar.

The public mood has moved beyond exasperation. I've never known such despair at the antics of the political class, the courts, the pro-Remain media.

Instead of action, honesty and plain speaking, all we get is self-indulgent waffle about the 'Benn Act', the 'Letwin Law', blah, blah . . .

They might as well call it the Bill And Ben Act, as the political class are all talking Flowerpot Man.

Flob-a-Dob, Flob-a-Dob, Flob-a-Dob.

And coming up after the break, it's Soubry Loo.

Weeeee-eeeeed!

Whether there will be a backlash if and when we are eventually allowed a General Election remains to be seen. The politicians will drag this out as long as they can, in the hope that we'll all get so bored we'll forget about it.

And at the centre of it all struts Mr Speaker himself, a preening popinjay in love with the magnificence of his own verbosity.

He's been described as the most powerful man in Britain, since staging a coup which empowered Parliament to neuter the Prime Minister and remove the Government's ability to govern.

Yet Parliament has seized power without accepting responsibility. It's what Kipling called the prerogative of the harlot through the ages.

Welcome to our very own Parliament of Whores.

But who, precisely, voted for that? To whom is Bercow accountable? Certainly not the electorate. Convention dictated that he was returned to Westminster unopposed.

In turn, he is supposed to remain unimpeachably impartial.

Yet Bercow ripped up his end of that bargain. Even his own deputy now says he is blatantly biased in favour of Remain.

And despite the fact that he was foisted on the Tories by Labour as a kind of practical joke at the end of the Brown years, the incoming Cameron government decided not to remove him.

Another triumph for Call Me Dave.

Bercow is due to retire at the end of this month. But I wouldn't put money on it. He's already broken his word on standing down once before.

My guess is that he won't give up the chair until Brexit is dead and buried, even if that takes another couple of years.

All we can do is watch impotently, while Bercow and his Remainer allies trash democracy before our very eyes.

The only thing we can be sure of is that when it comes to Brexit, The Man From Del Monte, he say B@££&%#$!

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/a...sons-deal.html
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
#504
Brexiters are dishonest. It's a proven fact
 
Blackleaf
#505
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Brexiters are dishonest. It's a proven fact

The Remainers told us that the EU has no plans for an army (it has), that a vote for Brexit would cause an immediate economic downturn (it didn't), thousands of job losses (employment is at its highest ever) and that Brexit will cause WWIII (it won't).

I wonder how many gullible folk voted Remain on the basis of those lies.
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
#506
Fact. Accept it
 
Blackleaf
#507
Leave Lies? Remainers Need To Look In The Mirror

The Huffington Post
Matthew Ellery
Programmes Officer at The Housing & Finance Institute
27th September 2017



Recently, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker blamed the Brexit vote on 40 years of lies and the lies of 'Leave' campaigners. Juncker is correct in one sense, there were many lies during the EU Referendum campaign. However, these lies were from the 'Remain' side. The so-called lies from Leavers are a figment of the federalists' imagination.

The UK gives the EU a gross contribution of £350 million a week. This is not a lie, and it is an amount which could be spent on the NHS if the UK Government so wished. These are usually touted as lies, but this stems from 'Remain' campaigners being unable to tell the difference between the words 'gross' and 'net' as well as the difference between the words 'could' and 'will'.

In reality the lies came from the 'Remain' campaign.

European Council President Donald Tusk, said western political civilisation would be destroyed if the UK voted 'Leave'. As I am sitting here writing this article, and as you are currently reading this, it is safe to say western political civilisation has not ended. Therefore, we must conclude this was a 'Remain' lie.

David Cameron implied in a speech about the "serried rows of white headstones" that World War 3 would be upon us if Brexit occurred. The last time I checked the UK had not invaded Poland or any other country, and therefore we must conclude this was a lie.

George Osborne predicted tax rises and spending cuts would be implemented. To date, no changes to the planned tax rates or public spending have been implemented. So, another lie, and thankfully after his sacking Osborne is no longer in a position create his 'punishment budget'.

Despite Anna Soubry's claim to the contrary on a recent Question Time appearance, Remainers did suggest there would be an immediate Brexit recession. No recession to date, in fact the OECD now believes the UK economy will grow 1.8% this year, up 0.1% on its pre-referendum estimate. Even Mark Carney, the Governor of the Bank of England, now admits he is "quietly optimistic" about Brexit. Lie number four.

3 million people in the UK will lose their jobs was the fictitious figure banded about. However, in July the claimant count fell by 8,600 to 763,600, despite an expected rise of 9,500. Another lie.

"A dangerous fantasy" is how then Deputy PM Nick Clegg described Nigel Farage's claim of EU plans to create an army. Barely three months on from the Referendum, Juncker has proposed an EU Army. I'm looking forward to Nick Clegg's next apology video like the one he made after his last whopper.

We were told companies would leave the UK in their droves, especially in the car industry. There is no sign of this, and UK car manufacturing achieving its 12th successive month of growth in July, with production passing one million units in seven months for the first time in 12 years. Lie number 7.

David Cameron said he wouldn't resign as Prime Minister if he lost the Referendum vote. Enough said.

The former Prime Minister also tried to claim the UK could manage its immigration policy while inside the EU. Why are 'Remain' campaigners insisting we start to control immigration in any Brexit deal then? Because we cannot control EU immigration now, proving Cameron was lying.

Universities wanted the UK to remain in the EU because leaving would result in Horizon 2020 funding disappearing. Our new Chancellor, Philip Hammond, has agreed to keep this funding in place. Lie number 10.

This is 10 of many lies spouted by the 'Remain' campaign during the EU referendum. It is about time us Brexiteers challenged this ridiculous narrative of leave lies and remain truths. We voted 'Leave' for control over the laws of this country, and the patronising suggestion we are gullible idiots is quite frankly ridiculous. Remain campaigners should look in the mirror if they want to find a liar. The sooner we Get Britain Out of the EU, the better.

https://m.huffingtonpost.co.uk/matth...cy7veWNU-vR62q
Last edited by Blackleaf; 3 weeks ago at 07:40 PM..
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
#508
Brexiters = Liars

Proven
 
Blackleaf
#509
Remainer MPs asking Boris on Saturday whether or not his deal would protect the wonderful workers' rights the EU has bestowed upon us.

The reality is that Britain has much better workers' rights than the EU.

Lie number 11.
 
Blackleaf
#510
Boris Johnson publishes his Brexit Withdrawal Bill: PM unveils 110-page 'declaration of independence' (with 124 pages of explanatory notes) just hours before MPs start to debate it - as he bids to push it through Parliament in THREE DAYS





The Prime Minister wants to pass his Brexit deal through the Commons in just three days as he attempts to avoid another delay to Britain's departure from the EU by October 31. Leader of the House Jacob Rees-Mogg told MPs debate on the Withdrawal Agreement Bill (WAB) would start on Tuesday with ministers hoping to get it through all its Commons stages by Thursday. Under the provisions of the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act (CRAG), an international treaty - such as the Brexit deal - must be laid before Parliament for at least 21 sitting days before ratification to take place

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...Ps-debate.html