Alberta adds 20,000 full-time jobs in March


tay
#1
On the other hand, the overall unemployment rate remains higher in Alberta – probably partly because so much of the Canadian oil industry is headquartered in Calgary and partly because more people are looking for work again now that the economy is perking up and there are more grounds for optimism here in Alberta. Nevertheless, that means there’s still something for opponents of Ms. Notley’s government to point to when the facts don’t support their narrative … for the moment, anyway.

Just the same, by any normal measure, the Alberta economy remains strong. “The Alberta economy as a whole is robust … certainly relative to other provinces,” University of Calgary economist Trevor Tombe recently told a Postmedia reporter . “I’d still say it’s the strongest economy in Canada.”

For its part, the federal statistics agency noted: “Employment in the province has been on an upward trend since the autumn of 2016.”

Alberta’s recession this time has been shallower than it was in either 2008 or 1981, Dr. Tombe noted in a Tweet the day the Statistics Canada numbers came out – both earlier recessions took place while the Progressive Conservative Party was managing the economy.

Nor does the province’s expected debt-to-GDP ratio of about 7-per-cent seem like a problem by any economic yardstick , despite the Opposition’s best efforts to raise debate to a hysterical pitch over the size of the provincial debt.

Alberta’s two main conservative opposition parties, and to a significant degree the mainstream media, have spent the past two years loudly and continually denouncing the NDP for the economic conditions the province faced – even though the most significant factor, the impact of the international price of oil on our historically one-note economy, was well beyond the provincial or even the federal government’s control.

Now that the measures they have taken seem to be bearing some fruit, conservatives appear to have nothing much to say about this situation and the media has gone very, very quiet. The conservative parties, at least, have an excuse, being focused as they are on their efforts to join together in a tiny-tent social-conservative-dominated Frankenparty.

They’re bound to argue the good economic news is all caused by factors outside Alberta, and has nothing to do with NDP policies – in other words, the only thing consistent about conservatives is their ideologically driven inconsistency.

For its part, the energy industry seems to be quietly supportive of what the Notley Government has been doing, which may also account for some conservative discomfort with the issue.

Indeed, the Alberta government’s most effective critics nowadays, if not its loudest ones, may be found in the environmental movement.

Alberta PoliticsSilence on the right and in the media about NDP role as Alberta adds an impressive 20,000 full-time jobs in March - Alberta Politics
 
Nick Danger
#2
I've maintained all along that the criticism coming from the right in Alberta is just political maneuvering, that the moves made by the NDP have been pretty much forced upon them as they would have been forced upon any government. It is becoming evident to the public at large that the opposition has little of substance to offer in the way of policy alternatives, and that criticism without alternatives is more whining than actual discussion.
 
taxslave
+1
#3
All from a leftward propaganda site. It is a fact that BC has the best economy in Canada. The reason? WE have a good government that works on sound economic principles , not political dogma like the ndp.
 
Nick Danger
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

All from a leftward propaganda site. It is a fact that BC has the best economy in Canada. The reason? WE have a good government that works on sound economic principles , not political dogma like the ndp.

If you could stray from the generalizations for a moment and supply some specific examples of where you think the Alberta NDP's governing policy is failing and give some suggestions as to how others would do things differently? "I'm right and you're not" doesn't leave much room for discussion.
 
captain morgan
+2
#5  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by Nick Danger View Post

I've maintained all along that the criticism coming from the right in Alberta is just political maneuvering, that the moves made by the NDP have been pretty much forced upon them as they would have been forced upon any government. It is becoming evident to the public at large that the opposition has little of substance to offer in the way of policy alternatives, and that criticism without alternatives is more whining than actual discussion.

Nothing was forced on them, the Dippers knew exactly what they were getting into before the election was called.

Quote: Originally Posted by Nick Danger View Post

If you could stray from the generalizations for a moment and supply some specific examples of where you think the Alberta NDP's governing policy is failing and give some suggestions as to how others would do things differently? "I'm right and you're not" doesn't leave much room for discussion.

Let's see, raising corp and personal taxes rather than trying to control spending... Threatening to play with the royalty rates in a low part of the commodity price cycle (PS - knowing full well those same rates were cheaper in neighbouring jurisdictions like Sask)... Invoking a LMR program that virtually drove out all of the small players in the industry...
 
B00Mer
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

All from a leftward propaganda site. It is a fact that BC has the best economy in Canada. The reason? WE have a good government that works on sound economic principles , not political dogma like the ndp.

20,000 jobs created, 100,000 jobs lost..

Alberta shed almost 25,000 jobs in January
Last edited by B00Mer; Apr 17th, 2017 at 11:39 AM..
 
Nick Danger
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Nothing was forced on them, the Dippers knew exactly what they were getting into before the election was called.

I was speaking more of the inability of any government to fend off things like the drop in the international oil price and something as unpredictable as a multi-billion dollar wild fire decimating the heart of the provincial economy.



Quote:

Let's see, raising corp and personal taxes rather than trying to control spending... Threatening to play with the royalty rates in a low part of the commodity price cycle (PS - knowing full well those same rates were cheaper in neighbouring jurisdictions like Sask)... Invoking a LMR program that virtually drove out all of the small players in the industry...

They were faced with a shortfall in tax revenue approaching ten billion dollars their first year in office. They had to make up the difference somewhere, and laying off thousands of government employees and cutting services to a public already in trouble was not a solution to them. They spread the bill out among those most able to pay, high income earners and profitable corporations.

Were the corporate tax rates cheaper in Saskatchewan? It's my understanding that raising the corporate tax rate to 12% brought it back into line with the lower end of the national average. The so called "Alberta Advantage" of lower taxes and a more business friendly regulatory climate was based on the promise of plentiful jobs and tax revenues in return, something the corporate community is no longer supplying. What we have now is constant hammering of trades and suppliers to "work for less or don't work at all" and environmental concerns taken off the back burner and moved right out of the kitchen. This is the legacy of the right.

What I'm saying is that while the displaced conservatives in Alberta are never short on criticism of what the NDP are doing, any suggestions for reasonable alternatives on their part are conspicuously absent.
 
TenPenny
#8
I do enjoy those who claim that jobs growth in Alberta is wrong and is a sign of failure by the gov't.
 
B00Mer
#9
Alberta unemployment falls to 8.5% as Calgary rate remains highest among major cities

Alberta is a shit hole.. quit trying to make it something it's not..

I can never understand why someone would pay $500,000 for a house in a frozen tundra with no space between the homes.. no yard.. you see this crap for miles. Also this crap hole city that has no jobs..



There are plenty of places in North America with that have spacious lots and the a 4 bed room home for $125,000 to $200,000

Calgary is the Arsehole of Canada.. quit trying to glorify a shithole.

 
captain morgan
#10
I can't even get my head around that logic... Aren't comfortable laying off gvt employees, but are A-OK with increasing taxes and instituting a punishing regulatory environment (that resulted directly in 10 of thousands of layoffs, investment dollars fleeing AB) resulting in no other option but to cut services AND go in debt.

Hint: You can increase corp taxes to 100%, but in the end, if the profit recorded is $0.00, well, you can do the math yourself on that... All the same, the only result is that business' will seek for friendly jurisdictions in which to spend the cash and hire people

PS - 'Those most able to pay' is code for the gvt is inept and can't control spending. Fact is, it will be the middle class and working poor that will get stuck with the bill despite all of the power-to-the-people horse sh*t.... Also, Look up progressive tax rates and then get back to me on exactly what demographics are footing the vast majority of the bill

Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Alberta unemployment falls to 8.5% as Calgary rate remains highest among major cities

Alberta is a shit hole.. quit trying to make it something it's not..


Don't let the door hit you in the a$$ on your way out
 
Nick Danger
#11
So how do you think it should have been done?

Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

PS - 'Those most able to pay' is code for the gvt is inept and can't control spending. Fact is, it will be the middle class and working poor that will get stuck with the bill despite all of the power-to-the-people horse sh*t.... Also, Look up progressive tax rates and then get back to me on exactly what demographics are footing the vast majority of the bill.

Personal income tax increases kick in for those at income levels above $125K/year. Not exactly "working poor". Those below that level saw a decrease.

As it has been from the start this is all just sour-grapes conservatives who were shown the door after decades of mismanagement and lack of foresight. I guess Misters Kenny and/or Jean will legislate the oil price back up to $120/bbl on their first day in office?
 
captain morgan
#12
  1. Shrink the size of gvt
  2. Curtail public spending where it can be done with minimal impact
  3. Ease the burden on small business' in order to help them retain workers
  4. Don't even think about fukking with the royalty rates or LMR program until such time that the industry can safely absorb those costs
  5. Don't punish people for succeeding through the tax system - try and encourage more success stories.
  6. Encourage more investment in the province by not increasing tax rates and expensive regulatory conditions

Quote: Originally Posted by Nick Danger View Post

Personal income tax increases kick in for those at income levels above $125K/year. Not exactly "working poor". Those below that level saw a decrease.

I see... So, $125k/year is the amount that it's acceptable to discriminate against this demographic?

Quote: Originally Posted by Nick Danger View Post

As it has been from the start this is all just sour-grapes conservatives who were shown the door after decades of mismanagement and lack of foresight. I guess Misters Kenny and/or Jean will legislate the oil price back up to $120/bbl on their first day in office?

Funny... This comment reeks of absolving the Dippers because someone else screwed-up in the past.... Hilarious
 
B00Mer
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Don't let the door hit you in the a$$ on your way out

Nothing more obnoxious than a highfalutin Red Neck that thinks they are better than everyone else.

Albertans with their new car, ATV, fancy houses think they are better than the rest of Canada.. however they have been suckered.

Albertans have highest debt load in Canada, Equifax says

They are Pocket poor and House poor. Most are underwater on their mortgages, barley scrapping by. Many are filing bankruptcy.

Bankruptcy claims on the rise in Alberta

Real Estate crash will soon hit Alberta, and the prices will roll back to the eighties.

Edmonton unprepared for coming real-estate crash, author says - Edmonton - CBC News

Like most Albertans from the past, when there was Good times they ran up debt like it was nothing.. same back in the eighties.. now oil is down and the economy is dead and people are loosing their shirts.
 
Nick Danger
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

This comment reeks of absolving the Dippers because someone else screwed-up in the past.... Hilarious

Not really, but it does poke holes in the right's strategy of blaming local government for a global problem.
 
captain morgan
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Nothing more obnoxious than a highfalutin Red Neck that thinks they are better than everyone else.

Give yourself some credit, you are far and away more obnoxious.

Quote: Originally Posted by Nick Danger View Post

Not really, but it does poke holes in the right's strategy of blaming local government for a global problem.

Oil was down to around $12/bbl during the Klein years and what you didn't see was complete and utter incompetence by gvt.

Blaming Notley's stupidity on global oil prices really goes no where
 
B00Mer
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Give yourself some credit, you are far and away more obnoxious.

Maybe so, but at least I'm not drowning in debt..

 
Nick Danger
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Albertans with their new car, ATV, fancy houses think they are better than the rest of Canada.. however they have been suckered.

True. Those hit hardest have been those living beyond their means. A few short months after the layoffs in the oil patch began in earnest, late 2014/early 2015, a steady stream of house and vehicle keys began showing up at banks. People who though the ten or fifteen thousand dollar monthly incomes would never end, and were spending as such were caught by surprise, mostly younger folk. Those who had been through the boom/bust cycle once or twice fared better.

The timing of that favored the conservatives, who were just far enough out the door to lay blame at the feet of the new government.
 
B00Mer
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Nick Danger View Post

True. Those hit hardest have been those living beyond their means. A few short months after the layoffs in the oil patch began in earnest, late 2014/early 2015, a steady stream of house and vehicle keys began showing up at banks. People who though the ten or fifteen thousand dollar monthly incomes would never end, and were spending as such were caught by surprise, mostly younger folk. Those who had been through the boom/bust cycle once or twice fared better.

No I'm pissed because of attitude here. Folks tend to have their noses in the air, not polite, not friendly. They think they are better than everyone else.

I miss the Alberta of 30 years ago, when you would get a waive and a smile. Much better class of people in Alberta back then.. (Then we got flooded with Easterners)

Alberta should build a wall and have Ontario pay for it..
 
captain morgan
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Maybe so, but at least I'm not drowning in debt..

Apparently you are:

BC Prov debt: $66,806,840,000
AB Prov debt: $32,252,380,000

Care to restate your position?

Quote: Originally Posted by Nick Danger View Post

The timing of that favored the conservatives, who were just far enough out the door to lay blame at the feet of the new government.

More excuses for what is yet another failed socialist gubmint.
 
B00Mer
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Apparently you are:

BC Prov debt: $66,806,840,000
AB Prov debt: $32,252,380,000

Care to restate your position?

You do understand I am talking about personal debt, not provincial debt.

...and yes, BC has the highest personal debt load with Alberta running up second. But your stats are off from what I was talking about.

Average household debt in Alberta $36,223

Average household debt in BC $38,619

source
 
captain morgan
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

You do understand I am talking about personal debt, not provincial debt.

...and yes, BC has the highest personal debt load with Alberta running up second. But your stats are off from what I was talking about.

Average household debt in Alberta $36,223

Average household debt in BC $38,619

source

I see, you were talking of you personally... Well, for me, other than a credit card, I have no debt whatsoever.

That said, we all have our share of the provincial debt (by the by, those numbers don't include unfunded liabilities) - looks like your original statement remains incorrect

Lastly, any analysis of the debt scenario really needs to incorporate GDP into the mix.
 
B00Mer
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

I see, you were talking of you personally... Well, for me, other than a credit card, I have no debt whatsoever.

I don't have debt.. zero, zilch..


Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

That said, we all have our share of the provincial debt (by the by, those numbers don't include unfunded liabilities) - looks like your original statement remains incorrect

Quit being a tard..

Do something productive and watch some free Movies..

https://yesmovies.to/
 
captain morgan
+1
#23
Clearly you don't have any inkling about economics.

... Can't say I'm surprised
 
B00Mer
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Clearly you don't have any inkling about economics.

... Can't say I'm surprised

 
captain morgan
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

This must be a picture of you as both characters... One of 'em has no intelligence and showcases it by opening their mouth and the other wouldn't understand it anyways.

Boomer to a 'T'
 
Nick Danger
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

  1. Shrink the size of gvt
  2. Curtail public spending where it can be done with minimal impact
  3. Ease the burden on small business' in order to help them retain workers
  4. Don't even think about fukking with the royalty rates or LMR program until such time that the industry can safely absorb those costs
  5. Don't punish people for succeeding through the tax system - try and encourage more success stories.
  6. Encourage more investment in the province by not increasing tax rates and expensive regulatory conditions

Well put. Your suggestions carry a facade of thoughtfulness, yet are sufficiently vague enough to defy close analysis. But let's have a go anyways:


1. Staffing levels or service levels? A little of both perhaps? Government cutbacks were a favorite of the conservative regime for years, effectively bringing the health and education systems to the point where a considerable influx of funding was required to keep to minimum standards. What areas are you proposing to reduce?
2. As above.
3. Small business is important to any economy, but in Alberta most of the small business services the larger corporate players, who are invoking serious cost-cutting measures themselves. How would you "ease the burden on small business" in this light?
4. Business is business and will always be as such. The major players in Alberta are not going broke, nor are they even in remote danger of doing so, but it is good corporate policy to cry to the media everytime government asks for more money. Check share prices and profitability for outfits like Suncor or CNRL, who are leaving a wake of unclaimed reclamation projects behind them. Also the number of abandoned wells that haven't been properly decommissioned and the cost involved in rectifying that is staggering. Conveniently the paperwork on ownership and lease obligations has changed sufficiently to let those who are responsible to start clean somewhere else. Take a guess as to who is going to get stuck with that bill. Don't fool yourself into thinking the industry is in tough shape. They're doing quite well despite the price crash, they're just doing at the expense of the taxpayer, small business and the workers.
5. Point unclear, can't comment.
6. I see what you're suggesting, but the "Alberta is open for business" message has to be tempered with a healthy dose of corporate responsibility. The profit motive is ever-present, and the corporate world is not particularly long on ethical fibre. Alberta has a responsibility to its resident to ensure that public resources are handled properly, and that those who figure they can simply roll in and fill their pockets and leave need to adjust their perspective. That's what the conservatives have done for decades and it's left things in a mess. Have a look at some of the Nordic countries, Norway in particular, who new the value of their resources and acted accordingly. The investors will return, are returning in fact, in response to oil prices and not government policy. Taxes are part of doing business. If an extra two percent of your profits going to the government is going to break the bank, then maybe you're in the wrong business.
 
B00Mer
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

This must be a picture of you as both characters... One of 'em has no intelligence and showcases it by opening their mouth and the other wouldn't understand it anyways.

Boomer to a 'T'

What are you, a teenager in school.. seriously. That response had to have been the gayest teeny bopper reply ever in the history of CC.
 
MHz
#28
Luckily Calgary does not represent Alberta. This is closer to the real deal.
 
captain morgan
+1
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Nick Danger View Post

[/LIST]Well put. Your suggestions carry a facade of thoughtfulness, yet are sufficiently vague enough to defy close analysis. But let's have a go anyways:


1. Staffing levels or service levels? A little of both perhaps? Government cutbacks were a favorite of the conservative regime for years, effectively bringing the health and education systems to the point where a considerable influx of funding was required to keep to minimum standards. What areas are you proposing to reduce?
2. As above.
3. Small business is important to any economy, but in Alberta most of the small business services the larger corporate players, who are invoking serious cost-cutting measures themselves. How would you "ease the burden on small business" in this light?
4. Business is business and will always be as such. The major players in Alberta are not going broke, nor are they even in remote danger of doing so, but it is good corporate policy to cry to the media everytime government asks for more money. Check share prices and profitability for outfits like Suncor or CNRL, who are leaving a wake of unclaimed reclamation projects behind them. Also the number of abandoned wells that haven't been properly decommissioned and the cost involved in rectifying that is staggering. Conveniently the paperwork on ownership and lease obligations has changed sufficiently to let those who are responsible to start clean somewhere else. Take a guess as to who is going to get stuck with that bill. Don't fool yourself into thinking the industry is in tough shape. They're doing quite well despite the price crash, they're just doing at the expense of the taxpayer, small business and the workers.
5. Point unclear, can't comment.
6. I see what you're suggesting, but the "Alberta is open for business" message has to be tempered with a healthy dose of corporate responsibility. The profit motive is ever-present, and the corporate world is not particularly long on ethical fibre. Alberta has a responsibility to its resident to ensure that public resources are handled properly, and that those who figure they can simply roll in and fill their pockets and leave need to adjust their perspective. That's what the conservatives have done for decades and it's left things in a mess. Have a look at some of the Nordic countries, Norway in particular, who new the value of their resources and acted accordingly. The investors will return, are returning in fact, in response to oil prices and not government policy. Taxes are part of doing business. If an extra two percent of your profits going to the government is going to break the bank, then maybe you're in the wrong business.

You have written lots of words but have said very little.

The comments about corporate responsibility (and presumably their glad acceptance of being fleeced through the tax and regulatory systems) is nothing shy of the philosophy that has landed so many NorAm jurisdictions into deep debt and (in a number of cases) bankruptcy.

Rather than waste much time rebutting each point, I'll suggest the following; Reliance on gvt as the end-all-be-all and source of wealth for a robust economy is a failed ideal.

Apply your personal metrics all you like, in the end, gvt revenues are fully dependent on the health and profitability of a private sector... All of the ideological rants will not change this.
 
Nick Danger
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Apply your personal metrics all you like, in the end, gvt revenues are fully dependent on the health and profitability of a private sector... All of the ideological rants will not change this.

True enough, but another constant in the business world is that the bottom line is everything. Businesses are in it for themselves and no one else. If the government doesn't think about getting the taxpayers their share, who does?