Why Haiti is punished still


darkbeaver
#1
A Giant Step for Mankind – Made in Haïti
The Bwa Kay Iman uprising against slavery

By Jeant Saint-Vil

Global Research, August 11, 2009

There was a time, not so long ago, when popes, kings and queens enriched themselves and built vast empires on the profits made with the sweat and blood of kidnapped men, women and children loaded on ships, stacked like sardines and reduced to slavery on plantations of coffee, sugar, cotton, cocoa, all over the Americas[1]. From the 1444 Portuguese attacks against the coast of Africa, followed by the 1452 papal bull of pope Nicholas V[2] which invited Christians to attack and enslave non-Christians, to the faithful year of 1791, millions of human beings had already been kidnapped, terrorized, thrown to sharks in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean . Immediately upon arrival on the islands or the mainland, they were worked to death, tortured, eaten alive by dogs that were especially trained to feed on African flesh or they were blown to pieces with ignited gun powder shoved into their sexual parts by British, Spanish, French and Portuguese colonizers. It has been estimated that the population of Africa in the mid 19th century would have been 50 million instead of 25 million had this catastrophe known as the MAAFA not taken place[3].
It is within such an atmosphere of unparalleled terrorism and human decadence that a remarkable gathering of men and women took place on the small Caribbean island of Haiti , the evening of August 14-15, 1791. Known as the Bwa Kay Iman Ceremony[4], it is said that this revolutionary meeting brought together representatives of twenty-one displaced African nations who vowed to revolt against the powers that had unleashed against their people such a relentless campaign of terror; a genocide that was expertly conceived and implemented, state-sponsored and financed, justified with numerous literary works and blessed by the most powerful and influential religious institutions of the day[5]
 
darkbeaver
#2
Creative-i / What is Canada Doing in Haiti? By Jean Saint-Vil The Ottawa Initiative
In contrast to Maclean’s pronouncement, a growing number of international critics insist that what is happening in Haiti is instead an odious imperialist crime in which Canada is shamefully complicit.[5] These skeptics argue that in January, 2003 the Canadian government organized a meeting to plan the illegal and violent overthrow of the democratically-elected government of the small Caribbean nation for political, ideological and economic reasons.[6] The meeting, called the “Ottawa Initiative on Haiti,” was held at the government’s Meech Lake conference centre in Gatineau, Québec, on January 31 and February 1, 2003, one year before the February 29, 2004 coup d’état.






The extraordinary decisions taken at this gathering of non-Haitians were first leaked to the general public in Michel Vastel’s March 2003 article, published in French-language magazine l’Actualité. Under the prophetic title “Haiti put under U.N. Tutelage?,” Vastel described how, in the name of a new Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine, parliamentarians of former colonial powers invited to Meech Lake by Minister Denis Paradis, decided that Haiti’s democratically-elected president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, had to be overthrown, a Kosovo-like trusteeship of Haiti implemented before January 1, 2004 while the US- subservient Haitian Army, the Forces armées d’Haiti (FAdH), would be reinstated alongside a new police force. The UN trusteeship project itself first surfaced in 2002 as mere rumor (or trial balloon?) in the neighboring Dominican Republic’s press.
While Canadian soldiers stood guard over Toussaint Louverture International Airport in Port-au-Prince, the president of Haiti and his wife were put on an airplane by US officials before dawn on February 29, 2004. According to world-renowned African-American author and activist Randall Robinson, who interviewed several eye-witnesses, the aircraft was not a commercial plane. No members of the Aristide government and no media were at the airport as Mr. and Mrs. Aristide were effectively abducted and taken to the Central African Republic against their will, following a refueling stop in the Caribbean island of Antigua.






Fenton notes that, of course, no reference to a coup or Ottawa Initiative is to be found in the Report or the Government’s response.
In “Canada in Haiti: Waging War on The Poor Majority,” written with colleague Yves Engler, Fenton documents various aspects of Canada’s involvement in the 2004 coup d’état.[24] Of particular note is the role CIDA played in both the destabilization campaign that prepared the way for the coup and the PR campaign which followed. In Damming the Flood, a book published by UK-based Canadian author Peter Hallward, Canada is deemed to have executed “its client functions in rare and exemplary fashion” in the eyes of the US, the ultimate leader of the multinational coup. “Canada’s foreign minister Pierre Pettigrew reportedly met with leading figures in the anti-Aristide opposition and insurgency shortly before the February coup and, as we have seen,” Hallward continues, “CIDA provided significant financial assistance to pro-coup pressure groups like the National Coalition for Haitian Rights-Haiti (NCHR-Haiti) and SOFA.”[25]
Upon analysis, the case of CIDA’s funding to NCHR-Haiti is particularly disturbing in that it provides direct evidence of collusion between the highest level of Canadian government and a pro-coup NGO of much disrepute in the eyes of Haitians and international observers alike. NCHR-Haiti is said to have caused great harm to the cause of peace and justice in Haiti. Chiefly among NCHR-Haiti’s damages, critics often point to the wrongful jailing of Haiti’s Prime Minister Yvon Neptune for over two years on trumped-up charges that were – through the CIDA/NCHR-Haiti connection – essentially financed by Canadian tax-payers. NCHR-Haiti has been so discredited on account of the Yvon Neptune wrongful imprisonment scandal that its US-based parent organization demanded that it change its name, which has since been modified to Réseau national de défense des droits humains (RNDDH).
 
eh1eh
-1
#3
If they only had Papa and Bebe back everything would be good. Just ask Raul. It works.

OK, enough sarcasm.

We should just invade Haiti. Our army should be able to do that. They're actually quite good despite the underfunding crap they suffer.
Then would could develop the sugar cane and tourism and the like. Hell maybe if were good at it the Dominican will want to join up. All we have to do is selectively kill all the ethnic minorities so everything will run smoothly.

Or we could just let the brain dead rot in the bed they made.
 
darkbeaver
-1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by eh1eh View Post

If they only had Papa and Bebe back everything would be good. Just ask Raul. It works.

OK, enough sarcasm.

We should just invade Haiti. Our army should be able to do that. They're actually quite good despite the underfunding crap they suffer.
Then would could develop the sugar cane and tourism and the like. Hell maybe if were good at it the Dominican will want to join up. All we have to do is selectively kill all the ethnic minorities so everything will run smoothly.

Or we could just let the brain dead rot in the bed they made.

They who made the bed aren't Haitian. Our army isn't our army anymore, we just pay the wages and buy the equipment and then Uncle Sam and Israel tell us what to do.
 
darkbeaver
#5
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    > UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti





Canada-Haiti: Hand in Hand for a Better Future


Canada has played an important role in international efforts to re-establish security and stability in Haiti and to assist in longer-term reform and reconstruction efforts. Canada's priorities in Haiti are: security, democratic governance and prosperity.

  • Construction of a New Detention Centre in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haïti

    Completing this project, a $4.36 million Canadian funded initiative, is considered a priority initiative by all stakeholders who are working to reform the security sector and establish rule of law in Haiti, including Haitian officials and members of the international community.

  • Canada’s contribution to Haiti - Four Years of Progress

    Canada is providing significant support for key stabilization initiatives in Haiti through the Department’s Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START). With an annual commitment of $15 million, START is contributing to three core priorities in Haiti.


News

  • 2009-05-29 -
    Completion of WFP humanitarian operation in Haiti
  • 2009-04-16 -
    Minister Oda Participates in the Successful Haiti Donors' Conference
  • 2009-01-15 -
    Governor General traveled to the Republic of Haiti: January 15 to 18, 2009
  • 2008-09-18 -
    Canadian Forces provide humanitarian aid to Haïti
  • 2008-09-01 -
    Canada Encourages Haitian Senate Vote
 
eh1eh
-1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

They who made the bed aren't Haitian. Our army isn't our army anymore, we just pay the wages and buy the equipment and then Uncle Sam and Israel tell us what to do.


OK, so obviously the Free Masons and the money changers don't give a f^ck about Haiti.
 
darkbeaver
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by eh1eh View Post

OK, so obviously the Free Masons and the money changers don't give a f^ck about Haiti.

You seem uncertain, less than fully convinced, uncommitted to law and justice, soft on crime.
 
darkbeaver
#8
  • Damming the Flood: Haiti, Aristide and the Politics of Containment
  • Peter Hallward
  • Verso (200
Four years ago this month, Canada supported a discreditable act of regime-change in Haiti -- a chain of events that ended with the removal of a legitimate head of state. It's a useful incident to remember as politicians and military men put on their most earnest faces to justify Canadians dying for freedom and democracy in Afghanistan.
Here is what's happening in that re-configured Haiti today:
  • According to the United Nations, half of all the young women in the country's shantytowns have been raped or sexually assaulted. At least a third of them are under 13.
  • Haiti's National Penitentiary has 3,200 inmates. It was built to hold 1,200. Many prisoners are held for months, even years, and only a tiny percentage are ever convicted. Some jails are so crowded that prisoners must sleep standing up or in shifts.
  • Some Haitians, mainly pregnant women, are so hungry and under-nourished that they eat "mud pies" made mostly of clay, salt and vegetable shortening.
  • Recently, mobs attacked two suspected kidnappers in Port-au-Prince, the capital, and stoned one of them to death. Vigilante justice is not unusual because authorities are powerless to prevent kidnappings. In the first 11 days of February alone, there were 15 abductions.
  • Last August, a noted Haitian human rights activist, Lovinsky Pierre-Antoine, met with a U.S. delegation. After the meeting, he was kidnapped, and nothing has been heard of him since.
  • Keeping the alleged "peace" are 9,000 foreign troops and policemen. In the eyes of some critics, they've become a permanent fixture. The monthly health-care bill for this UN contingent is greater than the annual health budget for Haiti's 8.7 million people!
  • Meanwhile, Haiti's most popular politician by far remains in exile thousands of miles away, and Canada, along with other countries, is actively lobbying to keep him there indefinitely, a violation of Haiti's constitution.
Canada has never revealed its full role in the ousting of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The sins of commission (or omission) happened below the radar. Thus, Canada can argue that it is blameless in t
The Tyee — Our Legacy of Shame in Haiti
 
tay
#9
Jean-Claude Duvalier, the second-generation “president for life” who plunged one of the world’s poorest countries into further despair by presiding over widespread killing, torture and plunder, died Oct. 4 at his home in Port-au-Prince. He was 63.


He had a heart attack, his lawyer, Reynold George, told the Associated Press.


Despite a brief, hopeful window when it appeared that the overweight, overwhelmed dauphin might liberalize the country, the younger Duvalier soon followed in his father’s violent footsteps. Tens of thousands of Haitians were killed under the regimes, with many more tortured, according to human-rights groups.


Jean-Claude Duvalier maintained his father’s well-established terror apparatus — most notably the Tontons Macoutes, the shadowy militia whose name means “bogeymen” — and added new techniques for skimming hundreds of millions of dollars from the national treasury.


Under the younger Duvalier’s watch, Haiti became the Western Hemisphere’s epicenter for AIDS, as well as a major cocaine-trafficking stop. Although he courted the United States and other donors with promises of human-rights reforms and a business-friendly economic policy, living conditions for Haitians dipped even lower than their already dismal standing.




Illiteracy rose and life expectancy sank. When tens of thousands of desperate, malnourished “boat people” tried to flee Haiti for U.S. shores during the 1970s and ’80s, Duvalier’s response, true to form, was to demand kickbacks from their unscrupulous human smugglers.


By the time he and his family boarded a U.S. Air Force cargo plane and flew to exile in 1986, with truckloads of Louis Vuitton luggage and millions of dollars in Swiss bank accounts, Duvalier had cemented his country’s status as the basket case of the Americas.


He remained unrepentant.




more




Jean-Claude Duvalier, ex-Haitian leader known as Baby Doc, dies at 63 - The Washington Post
 
tay
#10
A village in northern Haiti is transformed over two days each July into the spiritual center of the Voodoo religion.

Thousands of Haitians make their way to Plaine-du-Nord for the annual festival, riding for hours in packed buses or on the backs of overloaded motorbikes to celebrate a religion that is an integral part of life for many in this nation.

The pilgrims who trek to Plaine-du-Nord take ritual baths of mud, light candles and make offerings to the spirits. Voodoo evolved in the 17th century among African slaves and incorporates elements of the Roman Catholic faith that was forced upon them by French colonizers.

At Plaine-du-Nord, people pray and make offerings at the Catholic church of St. James, who is known as Ogoun Feraille and revered by followers of Voodoo. They then make a three-hour walk to the top of a mountain, near the country's famed, 19th century Citadel fortress, where St. James is believed to have once appeared.

This is one of two important Voodoo pilgrimages that take place in July in Haiti. The other is held at the cascading waterfalls of Saut d'Eau in central Haiti, where people gather and scrub their bodies with aromatic leaves and soap in a three-day festival. The faithful also converge on a nearby Catholic church to pray to the Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel, associated in the religion with the Voodoo goddess of Erzulie.

Some believe these festivals will ease their troubles in a country where hardship is nearly universal. Others make specific requests such as a winning lottery numbers or a cure for an illness. One man came with a list that included a car and a job.

Life in Haiti, where more than half the people are trying to survive on less than $2 a day, has always been difficult, but these are particularly tough times. The rising U.S. dollar has made high inflation worse and driven up the price of basic goods that were already expensive. The country is also dealing with another period of political uncertainty, struggling to resolve a political impasse and elect a president after last year's election was declared invalid because of fraud.

Amid it all, an AP photographer at Plaine-du-Nord on July 23-24 heard one young woman praying for escape from Haiti.

"In a country where we have no hope in our government, oh St. James, please help me find a visa to leave the country to have a better life," she said, weeping as she lit a candle in a bright red and blue dress.

AP PHOTOS: Voodoo festival transforms Haitian village | SanDiegoUnionTribune.com
 
MHz
#11
Somebody has yet to explain why Haiti wins a war of independence against France yet they have to pay the same France a 'freedom Loan' that takes them 250 years to pay off. It would seem tha France is nothing but an extortionist to begin with and that loan was only paid off in full about 60 years ago.

Now onto the bad news that is the 'help' they got after the quake. Most of it has been freely given by Cuba and the Red Cross types of businesses have been enjoying a windfall as far as circulating the money that was received to 'themselves' for the most part.. That Haiti??

Voodoo, hire them to go to Syria and put the hex on ISIS. Nothing else tried by the west seem to be making much of an impact.
 
Gilgamesh
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

A Giant Step for Mankind – Made in Haïti
The Bwa Kay Iman uprising against slavery

By Jeant Saint-Vil

Global Research, August 11, 2009

There was a time, not so long ago, when popes, kings and queens enriched themselves and built vast empires on the profits made with the sweat and blood of kidnapped men, women and children loaded on ships, stacked like sardines and reduced to slavery on plantations of coffee, sugar, cotton, cocoa, all over the Americas[1]. From the 1444 Portuguese attacks against the coast of Africa, followed by the 1452 papal bull of pope Nicholas V[2] which invited Christians to attack and enslave non-Christians, to the faithful year of 1791, millions of human beings had already been kidnapped, terrorized, thrown to sharks in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean . Immediately upon arrival on the islands or the mainland, they were worked to death, tortured, eaten alive by dogs that were especially trained to feed on African flesh or they were blown to pieces with ignited gun powder shoved into their sexual parts by British, Spanish, French and Portuguese colonizers. It has been estimated that the population of Africa in the mid 19th century would have been 50 million instead of 25 million had this catastrophe known as the MAAFA not taken place[3].
It is within such an atmosphere of unparalleled terrorism and human decadence that a remarkable gathering of men and women took place on the small Caribbean island of Haiti , the evening of August 14-15, 1791. Known as the Bwa Kay Iman Ceremony[4], it is said that this revolutionary meeting brought together representatives of twenty-one displaced African nations who vowed to revolt against the powers that had unleashed against their people such a relentless campaign of terror; a genocide that was expertly conceived and implemented, state-sponsored and financed, justified with numerous literary works and blessed by the most powerful and influential religious institutions of the day[5]

Haiti's problem is simple and threefold.
1. Utterly incompetent and corrupt government.

2. No OIL

3. A (nominal) RC influence that makes birth control and other women's reproductive rights unavailable.

No need to get into anymore detail than that.
 
HarperCons
#13
It's called class warfare. Haiti was punished and still being punished for overthrowing their bourgeois oppressors and utterly embarrassing them.
 
Walter
-1
#14
Mr. and Mrs. Clinton saved Haiti.
 
HarperCons
-1
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Mr. and Mrs. Clinton saved Haiti.

yea fightin to lower wages of haitians really helped them, shut the **** up and choke on your dentures.
 
DaSleeper
#16
Are you related to Josh? or are you a member of the same communist organization?
 
HarperCons
#17
do u need to be in a home?
 
DaSleeper
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by HarperCons View Post

do u need to be in a home?

I own my own home!
I don't live in my mother's basement like you and just live to waste my time at the gym!
Too bad for you that they are closed and for us because you spend more time on the forum!