King Henry VIII ordered for Meghan Markle's ancestor to be beheaded


Blackleaf
#1
She has, by all accounts, had nothing but a warm welcome from the Royal Family so far.

The forebears of Meghan Markle, the girlfriend of Prince Harry, were not quite so fortunate, it has emerged.

A study into the American actress’s family tree has discovered her ancestor was in fact beheaded on the orders of Henry VIII, his wealth and land confiscated after a spectacular fall from favour...

King Henry VIII ordered for Meghan Markle's ancestor to be beheaded



Prince Harry and Meghan Markle at the Invictus Games Credit: REX/Shutterstock

Hannah Furness, Royal Correspondent
18 November 2017
The Telegraph

She has, by all accounts, had nothing but a warm welcome from the Royal Family so far.

The forebears of Meghan Markle, the girlfriend of Prince Harry, were not quite so fortunate, it has emerged.

A study into the American actress’s family tree has discovered her ancestor was in fact beheaded on the orders of Henry VIII, his wealth and land confiscated after a spectacular fall from favour.

Lord Hussey, 1st Baron Hussey of Sleaford, was the great-great-great-grandfather of Captain Christopher Hussey, who left England in the 1650s to become a Founding Father of Nantucket.

Ten generations later, in a new family tree in America, came Thomas W. Markle, who married Doria Ragland to produce Rachel Meghan Markle, born in 1981.

The actress, who has just finished filming US legal drama Suits, is expected to move to the UK imminently to be with Prince Harry, returning to the land of her distant paternal ancestors.

Her family tree has already been researched by television documentaries and newspapers as her relationship with the prince moved closer to a rumoured engagement, with revelations that some of her ancestors on her father’s side hailed from the coal mining areas of Yorkshire, while her mother’s forebears were traced to a slave forced to work on the Georgia plantations before being emancipated with the abolition of slavery in 1865.

Ms Markle and the prince are, it is claimed, distant cousins through a mutual ancestor: High Sheriff of County Durham Ralph Bowes, born in 1480.

Michael Reed, an Australian teacher and amateur historian who has made a study of the modern Royal Family and their connection, has gone one step further, to find evidence of the Markle family’s connections to the royalty of Tudor England.

Curiously, he believes the Markle family may already be aware of the connections, after coming across independent research by a Mike Markle, understood to be the actress’s great-uncle, online from 20 years ago.

His own investigations have taken the family tree back to King John, who lived from 1166 to 1216, in a line which includes John Hussey, 1st Baron Hussey of Sleaford, born in 1465.

An illustrious career saw Lord Hussey knighted in the field for his loyalty to Henry VIII at the Battle of Blackheath, work as a diplomatic envoy, made esquire of the body and chamberlain to the King’s daughter Princess Mary.

He was later present at the christening of Princess Elizabeth, carrying the canopy over her.

His fall from royal favour came after the 1536 Pilgrimage of Grace, a rebellion against Henry VIII he was unable to successfully put down.

His loyalty called into question, he was found guilty of treason, imprisoned in the Tower and eventually executed.


Actress Meghan Markle poses in the CAFA portrait studio at The Fairmont Royal York Hotel Credit: Getty

Mr Reed first came across intriguing snippets of information while researching America’s Founding Fathers and Nantucket while he was teaching a course on the subject.

Reading up on Christopher Hussey and his family, he recognised the name “Markle” on a geneology forum also investigating the same family tree.

Mr Reed had been particularly interested to read about Ms Markle’s family history, he said, after previously researching the forebears of Kate Middleton, who went on to become Duchess of Cambridge.

There, too, he found royal connections, with two of her father Michael’s relations baronesses who were invited to successive coronations.

“You can’t just look at one parent,” he said. “You must look at both sides to get the full picture.

“It’s incredible that Meghan's great-great-great maternal grandfather was a slave and the other great-great-great paternal grandmother was a New Hampshire landowner, who had royal blood.”


Lord Hussey, 1st Baron Hussey of Sleaford

The research comes amid mounting speculation that Ms Markle could become the next so-called “commoner” to marry into the Royal Family thanks to her blossoming relationship with Prince Harry.

The actress has finished filming Suits, shut down her lifestyle blog and reportedly ended her advertising contracts in indications she could be about to move to the UK permanently.

In September, less than a year after the relationship was confirmed by Prince Harry, Ms Markle broke her silence with a gushing Vanity Fair interview in which she disclosed: "We’re two people who are really happy and in love.”

Prince Harry, who remains fifth-in-line to the throne until the arrival of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s third baby, must ask the Queen's permission before marriage.

King Henry VIII ordered for Meghan Markle's ancestor to be beheaded*
Last edited by Blackleaf; Nov 19th, 2017 at 06:41 AM..
 
Curious Cdn
#2
Henry VIII was a tyrant and it didn't require much to end up like that ... adherence to Catholicism would do it or saying something nasty about Henry's latest bride. It sounds like a badge of honour, to me.
 
Blackleaf
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Henry VIII was a tyrant

How was he more tyrannical than any other monarch of the era?

Quote:

... adherence to Catholicism would do it

Henry himself was a Catholic.

I wouldn't have wanted to be a Protestant during the reign of his and Catherine of Aragon's daughter Queen Mary I, though. Unlike her father and her half-sister Elizabeth I, she really did persecute people (Protestants) just for practising their faith.
 
Curious Cdn
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

How was he more tyrannical than any other monarch of the era?

Henry himself was a Catholic.

.

That, of course, would explain why he went do easy on the Monasteries.
 
Blackleaf
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

That, of course, would explain why he went do easy on the Monasteries.

The monasteries were institutions of corruption, vice, sordidness and debauchery. He was right to do away with them.

And England did the right thing in turning Protestant. Catholicism and Popery is the wrong path to take.
 
Danbones
#6
Yes, you have a sh!T sandwich and taking off one slice of bread and throwing it away is an improvement?

OK, sure.

Like they say about the protestants who immigrated to the US to get religious freedom back in the day. Were they running from Catholics?
NOPE!!!
They were running from other Protestants!!!
 
Curious Cdn
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The monasteries were institutions of corruption, vice, sordidness and debauchery. He was right to do away with them.

And England did the right thing in turning Protestant. Catholicism and Popery is the wrong path to take.

My Presbyterian ancestors used to raise armies regularly to sweep down and save you Sassenachs from your popery.
 
Blackleaf
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

My Presbyterian ancestors used to raise armies regularly to sweep down and save you Sassenachs from your popery.

It was successive English monarchs that saved us from Popery - Henry VIII (even though he was a Catholic), Elizabeth I, James I...
 
Curious Cdn
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

It was successive English monarchs that saved us from Popery - Henry VIII (even though he was a Catholic), Elizabeth I, James I...

Been to a C of E mass lately?

It didn't work.
 
Blackleaf
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Been to a C of E mass lately?

It didn't work.

Protestant churches are devoid of decoration and idolatrous images of Mary and Jesus on the cross. And Protestants rightfully worship God alone, not Mary as the idolatrous Catholics do.

And destroying Catholic influence over England meant we didn't live under the terror of the Inquisition and other evil Catholic organisations.
 
Curious Cdn
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Protestant churches are devoid of decoration and idolatrous images of Mary and Jesus on the cross. And Protestants rightfully worship God alone, not Mary as the idolatrous Catholics do.

And destroying Catholic influence over England meant we didn't live under the terror of the Inquisition and other evil Catholic organisations.

Protestant churches also don't ting-a-ling bells, smudge the church with incense, perform slight-of-hand tricks and fire off flash pots like the High Anglicans do.
 
Blackleaf
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Protestant churches also don't ting-a-ling bells, smudge the church with incense, perform slight-of-hand tricks and fire off flash pots like the High Anglicans do.

The High Anglicans are just as idolatrous as the Catholics.
 
Curious Cdn
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The High Anglicans are just as idolatrous as the Catholics.

Amen.