US Border Patrol Agent Indicted for Murder After Using a Mexican Child for Target Pra


Twila
#1
whoops!

___________________________

Tucson, AZ — Lonnie Swartz may become the first US Border Patrol agent to be convicted of murder in a cross-border shooting.

A federal grand jury indicted Mr. Swartz for second-degree murder on Wednesday in the 2012 death of 16-year-old Mexican citizen Jose Antonio Elena Rodriguez.

The teenager was standing in Mexican territory, unarmed when the predatory agent shot him 10 times through the border fence. Rodriguez’s family said he was simply walking home from a basketball game.

The Border Patrol claims that their agent’s life was in danger, and Rodriguez was part of a group throwing rocks. Even if the teen picked up a rock, it is known that agents will open fire instead of simply moving out of the way, according to a report published in June.

Sean Chapman, Mr. Swartz’s attorney, said his client will plead not guilty at an Oct. 9 arraignment. He tried unsuccessfully to get the lawsuit thrown out based on the claim that the Mexican teenager has no Constitutional rights. A court has agreed with this stance in previous cases with similar circumstances.

Predictably, the Border Patrol Union criticized the indictment, suggesting their agents are the victims of “a world of political agendas and armchair quarterbacking.”

Arizona seems to have a penchant for Border Patrol agents murdering immigrants. Two other agents have been charged before, but one was acquitted and the other resulted in hung juries.

The Border Patrol has killed 10 people since 2010 in 40 cases of use of deadly force against alleged rock throwers.
Swartz’s indictment comes at a time of increased awareness of the Border Patrol’s excessive use of force. Even a Homeland Security Advisory Council report found that the agency has little care for life and is swamped with corruption.

“Lethargic investigations of internal abuses and a vulnerability to systematic corruption by drug smugglers and other criminals are the basis for the Council’s recommendation that U.S. Customs and Border Protection add approximately 350 criminal investigators to its current staff of 200 — a 175% increase — in order to help mitigate internal corruption and the use of unnecessary force against migrants.

The 29-page report, composed by the independent counsel that reports to Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, attacks the agency’s propensity to shoot unarmed or non-threatening individuals. It suggests that officials review their policies and prioritize the preservation of human life as hundreds of shootings by Border Patrol agents remain unaccounted for.”

The fact that Swartz shot Rodriguez 10 times, through a fence, does not lend credibility to the argument that he was trying to save his own life. It instead suggests that he used the Mexican teen for target practice in an act of inhumanity.

Swartz also faces a civil lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union by Elena Rodriguez, the boy’s mother. The outcome of the cases will tell us whether the government will take Border Patrol’s problem of corruption and excessive force seriously, or let it continue to spiral out of hand.

US Border Patrol Agent Indicted for Murder After Using a Mexican Child for Target Practice | Alternet
 
AnnaG
+1
#2
Should maybe stick the jerk in a army uniform and send him to Kunduz instead of in jail. It'd probably be cheaper.
 
B00Mer
-1
#3
Definitely a Trump supporter..
 
Tecumsehsbones
-1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

Should maybe stick the jerk in a army uniform and send him to Kunduz instead of in jail. It'd probably be cheaper.

Um. . . no thanks. The Army actually isn't a bunch of undisciplined thugs and murderers.

They're a bunch of disciplined thugs and murderers.

Must keep up standards.

I almost feel sorry for Swartz. He vas chust follovink orders.
 
Jinentonix
#5
Hmmm, maybe that "nutbar" suggestion to build a wall between the US and Canada isn't so nutty after all.


The sad thing is, US Border Services has a LONG history of hiring complete idiots, even on the northern border.
 
EagleSmack
#6
Make him a Mountie?
 
Walter
#7
Indicted not convicted.
 
Twila
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Indicted not convicted.

yet.
 
Walter
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

yet.

Good thing the US has due process.
 
Twila
+2
#10  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Good thing the US has due process.

yeah, too bad that doesn't really mean anything. Nice sentiment though.
 
Ludlow
#11
Can't relate to how a person can perceive someone as a target rather than a living breathing human being . ten times. unreal
 
EagleSmack
#12
Did the agent say he was using the kid as target practice?

Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

yeah, too bad that doesn't really mean anything. Nice sentiment though.

Why doesn't it mean anything?
 
Tecumsehsbones
#13
The skinny ones can be a real challenge.
 
Twila
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Ludlow View Post

Can't relate to how a person can perceive someone as a target rather than a living breathing human being . ten times. unreal

I've suspected that it's their training and environment that does it. Law enforcement of any branch should have on site counselling and it should be compulsory. PTSD comes in many shades, many ways and it's something that must be rampant when you kill or witness killings.

There is clearly a very large disconnect between what we ask, what we expect and what is demanded of law enforcement.
 
EagleSmack
+1
#15
Good grief... law enforcement and PTSD. Another reason to check out early with a pension.
 
Twila
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post


Why doesn't it mean anything?

because in reality it does not apply or work for everybody.

Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

Good grief... law enforcement and PTSD. Another reason to check out early with a pension.


They'd still suffer though. I think we put a huge emotional burden on them and with the military and expect them to just carry on like life was normal. We allow the gov't to treat them brutally from start to finish.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#17
Juice boxes. That's the answer.
 
Twila
+1
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Juice boxes. That's the answer.

I'd suggest juice boxes served in a environment that encourages without punishment verbal expressions of a person emotional state and offers real advice, drugs if needed, and paid time off for those who need to spend time with their families.

If we're going to ask these people to put their lives and emotional health at risk for us, then they deserve to be treated to the very best of what works for that individual.

We seem to pay the wrong people the big bucks (movie stars, athletes, celebrities) and neglect those that we ask to protect us.
 
EagleSmack
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

They'd still suffer though. I think we put a huge emotional burden on them and with the military and expect them to just carry on like life was normal. We allow the gov't to treat them brutally from start to finish.

They would suffer? For the most part they would laugh their way to the bank. Give them that option and see what happens.

Our police in Massachusetts make HUGE money. Many over 6 figures and I am not talking about the Chief. Every year they release the payroll in my town. HUGE cash. The bigger the city the bigger the check.

Who do we treat brutally? The military and cops?
 
Twila
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

They would suffer? For the most part they would laugh their way to the bank. Give them that option and see what happens.

Our police in Massachusetts make HUGE money. Many over 6 figures and I am not talking about the Chief. Every year they release the payroll in my town. HUGE cash. The bigger the city the bigger the check.

Who do we treat brutally? The military and cops?


Wow, way to go Massechusetts! Your (USA) most dangerous city, Detroit, doesn't pay very well at all. By suffering I mean PTSD, anxiety, and the effects that long term stress has on the body.

I make more and the only dangerous thing for me is the possibility of an angry nerd/geek staring at me angrily.

Our RCMP are not paid that well at all. Police, non rcmp are paid slightly better.

The military is treated brutally. At least here in Canada and considering the service they provide.

I just feel that if you risk your life on a daily basis you deserve to live well and be emotionally and physically taken care of.
 
EagleSmack
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

Wow, way to go Massechusetts! Your (USA) most dangerous city, Detroit, doesn't pay very well at all. By suffering I mean PTSD, anxiety, and the effects that long term stress has on the body.

Well that is because of mismanagement.

Quote:

The military is treated brutally. At least here in Canada and considering the service they provide.

Can you define brutal? Are you talking about military discipline? Following orders, doing as you are told and such? What is brutal in your mind?
 
Twila
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

Well that is because of mismanagement.



Can you define brutal? Are you talking about military discipline? Following orders, doing as you are told and such? What is brutal in your mind?

Not how the military treats them, but how the gov't does and how we (general population) of them after service.

My dad joined the Navy when he was 17 and I believe if it wasn't for the discipline the navy instilled in him, my childhood would have been horrendous. My dad had some very major issues do to his upbringing. However, he was fortunate. His service was only for a few of years and at that time the conflict in the far east had mostly abated. He was only there for clean up, so what they saw wasn't caused by them and they were helping. If he had been there for the conflict and had been engaged in creating what he saw while cleaning up, I don't think he would have mentally survived.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2
#23
I actually understand what you're talking about, Twila. And I agree with you to an extent. But several things need to be separated.

Military vs. police - very different scenarios.

Police vs. police - Maybe it's different in Canada, I hope it is, but while it's true, as they say, that "most cops are honest people doing an incredibly dangerous job," that should be "many cops" and the job ain't all that dangerous.

Just as many cops are honest, idealistic young men and women, many really are thugs. Many are people of mediocre intelligence, inferior education, and bad attitudes who get their rocks off pushing people around and having "authority." This attitude is focused and reinforced by their training, which is increasingly militaristic (not military), and emphasizes how the people they encounter are enemies to be dominated, not citizens to be served. They also have complete contempt for Constitutional freedoms, and work hard to find ways around them or through them.

Many, probably most, bad cops weren't turned bad by their experiences. They started out pretty bad, and were turned really bad by their training.
 
Twila
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

I actually understand what you're talking about, Twila. And I agree with you to an extent. But several things need to be separated.

Military vs. police - very different scenarios.

Police vs. police - Maybe it's different in Canada, I hope it is, but while it's true, as they say, that "most cops are honest people doing an incredibly dangerous job," that should be "many cops" and the job ain't all that dangerous.

Just as many cops are honest, idealistic young men and women, many really are thugs. Many are people of mediocre intelligence, inferior education, and bad attitudes who get their rocks off pushing people around and having "authority." This attitude is focused and reinforced by their training, which is increasingly militaristic (not military), and emphasizes how the people they encounter are enemies to be dominated, not citizens to be served. They also have complete contempt for Constitutional freedoms, and work hard to find ways around them or through them.

Many, probably most, bad cops weren't turned bad by their experiences. They started out pretty bad, and were turned really bad by their training.

I think manditory counselling would certainly go a long way to either weeding the undesirables out and helping those that become that way, but don't want to be that way. It would also help the public to feel a little more confident that those who are there to protect us are evaluated regularily and are participating in a mental health program.

There has to be a way to fix the problem, right?
 
AnnaG
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Hmmm, maybe that "nutbar" suggestion to build a wall between the US and Canada isn't so nutty after all.


The sad thing is, US Border Services has a LONG history of hiring complete idiots, even on the northern border.

The last US border dude I talked with was pretty bright. He had seen action as a Green Beret recon specialist but he had a degree in archaeology (I have one in anthropology). Mind you, that was at the border at Porthill, ID, so maybe the southern bordere guards are different.
The idiots I have encountered at the border have all been Canadian guards and most of THEM were Francs. They were the ones that turned off any impulse I ever had of venturing over to Kewbeck.
 
taxslave
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

I think manditory counselling would certainly go a long way to either weeding the undesirables out and helping those that become that way, but don't want to be that way. It would also help the public to feel a little more confident that those who are there to protect us are evaluated regularily and are participating in a mental health program.

There has to be a way to fix the problem, right?

That would depend a large part on the quality of the shrink. What I've seen of them in the school system and the military does not inspire confidence in government employees.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#27
Force used by an officer should be directly proportional to the threat to that officer. A gun is not appropriate for a rock when separated by a fence.

I guess we really need that wall sooner rather than later.
 
taxslave
+2
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

Force used by an officer should be directly proportional to the threat to that officer. A gun is not appropriate for a rock when separated by a fence.

I guess we really need that wall sooner rather than later.

If for no other reason than to protect the Mexican population from northern murderers.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

I think manditory counselling would certainly go a long way to either weeding the undesirables out and helping those that become that way, but don't want to be that way. It would also help the public to feel a little more confident that those who are there to protect us are evaluated regularily and are participating in a mental health program.

There has to be a way to fix the problem, right?

I agree, and the place to start is training. With the backlash against police intimidation and brutality we've been seeing for a couple of years now in the U.S., some departments are emphasizing an approach of "Guardians Not Warriors" in their police training, both initial and ongoing training.

I hope it continues, and I hope it works. We need to replace the "warrior" culture that sadly and outrageously has been pushed for the last 30-40 years. I think it will help a lot if police are trained as I've outlined. After that, I think regular counseling, both by professionals and by the sergeants, is necessary to identify the bad boys and process them out, and to help the good guys avoid slipping into depression and despair on the way to becoming bad cops.

EagleSmack is absolutely right in one way. Simply adding a counseling requirement will not help. We need a change in the culture of police. They need the kind of pride the Marines have. It should be a matter of pride for a cop to say, as Kevin Vickers did, "In my 30 years I never fired my weapon outside of the training range." Cops should be lauded and rewarded for being smart, not tough.

As far as counseling goes, I think you're right about witnessing violence, but what's even more important is that cops spend a lot of their time dealing with the poor, the ill-educated, the hopeless, the disaffected, and the mentally ill. That's what I mean when I say "avoiding slipping into depression and despair." Counseling, both traditional and force-based (by which I mean "cop-to-cop" talks with the training officers and sergeants) can help cops avoid slipping into a "people are scum" attitude. THAT is the birthplace of police brutality.
 
gerryh
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post


Our RCMP are not paid that well at all. Police, non rcmp are paid slightly better.


So, how much do you think they get paid?
 

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