Terrorist Attack in Vegas :: BREAKING!!!


darkbeaver
#541
Missing Las Vegas Shooting Witness Shot Dead

By wmw_admin on October 24, 2017
Jay Greenberg — Neon Nettle Oct 21, 2017


A key witness in the Las Vegas shooting massacre, who mysteriously vanished shortly after giving a statement that conflicted with the "official" narrative, has been shot dead outside a central Las Vegas Valley church. Chad Nishimura was a valet worker from the Mandalay Bay hotel, who parked the

Read more at: Missing Las Vegas Shooting Witness Shot Dead Outside Church
© Neon Nettle
 
MHz
+1
#542
Is that 3 so far? Usually that is a signal for all witnesses to shut the fuk up and let the lies go unchallenged.
 
darkbeaver
#543
Oct 24 07:52

Private paramilitary firm worked hand-in-hand with LVMPD on the night of the Las Vegas massacre


According to actual law enforcement communications from the night of the Oct 1 massacre, a private company named Battlefield Vegas worked hand-in-hand with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department after receiving orders to deliver three armored vehicles to South Central Aera Command as strike teams were being dispatched to numerous casinos along the strip.

Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Is that 3 so far? Usually that is a signal for all witnesses to shut the fuk up and let the lies go unchallenged.

I suppose this whole thing is starting to look a bit odd. I'm sure it's just bizzare coincidence, butt it is something the Russians would do or maybe the Chinese or perhaps Rocket Man NK, it could not possibly be one or more flag plastered domestic services dedicated to protecting Murcans.
 
DaSleeper
+1
#544
I wonder if the conspiracy theories will last as long as the ones for Kennedy?
 
JLM
+1
#545
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

I wonder if the conspiracy theories will last as long as the ones for Kennedy?


As long as there are people living boring lives!
 
MHz
+1
#546
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

I wonder if the conspiracy theories will last as long as the ones for Kennedy?

They will both outlive you so don't worry about it.
 
darkbeaver
#547
Conspiracy will exist long after you chumps are dead and gone,me too. It happens as regularly as bowel movements and they stink as well.
 
MHz
#548
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

As long as there are people living boring lives!

Unlike the loco collective who spend enormous amounts of energy try to cover things up. News flash, it isn't working now and it has never worked in the past.
 
MHz
#549
https://www.nytimes.com/video/us/100...imes&smtyp=cur

10 Minutes. 12 Gunfire Bursts. 30 Videos. Mapping the Las Vegas Massacre.
 
tay
#550
Nearly 900 people have been killed, and almost 2,000 wounded, by American gun violence since the Las Vegas shooting gripped the world's attention at the beginning of this month.

Gunman Stephen Paddock’s massacre of 58 people from the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino the night of Oct. 1 was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, and he left more than 400 people wounded after opening fire with a tricked-out semi-automatic weapon.

National and international media have not delved into the personal tragedies of those who have died in American gun violence since, though what could be mistaken for “normal” bloodshed is unique in that it is a reminder of a problem not faced by any other developed country.

Data compiled by the Gun Violence Archive shows that 896 people have died as the result of shootings since Vegas, with 23-year-old Ellie Becote of Pamplico, S.C., the first fatal victim listed after those at the Route 91 Harvest Music Festival.

Nearly 900 people dead in gun violence since Las Vegas massacre - NY Daily News
 
spaminator
#551
20/20: 10/27/17: 27 Days Later: Mystery in Las Vegas Watch Full Episode | 10/27/2017
 
spaminator
#552
Possible charges in connection with Vegas shooting, says lawyer
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
January 16, 2018
Updated:
January 16, 2018 7:39 PM EST
In this Oct. 9, 2017 file photo, Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo discusses the Route 91 Harvest festival mass shooting at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Las Vegas. A lawyer for Las Vegas police told a judge on Jan. 16 that charges could be filed in connection with the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, even though the gunman is dead. Erik Verduzco / AP
LAS VEGAS — Charges could be filed in connection with the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, even though the gunman responsible for killing 58 people is dead, a lawyer for Las Vegas police told a judge Tuesday.
Attorney Nicholas Crosby did not identify new evidence or suspects but said charges might be possible depending on the results of an ongoing investigation.
Sheriff Joe Lombardo and the FBI have said they believe Stephen Paddock acted alone to carry out the Oct. 1 shooting that also injured hundreds before killing himself.
“Without naming names, there are potential charges against others as a result of the ongoing investigation?” Clark County District Court Judge Elissa Cadish asked Crosby as he argued to keep police search-warrant records sealed.
“Yes,” said Crosby, who represents the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, which Lombardo leads. “There are charges being investigated.”
The attorney declined outside court to say whom he referred to.
Officer Laura Meltzer, a Las Vegas police spokeswoman, said the department is “investigating possible criminal charges related to items discovered during the service of search warrants.” She did not name a suspect and said she could not specify the type of charges or what was found without compromising the investigation.
In this Monday, Oct. 2, 2017 file photo, drapes billow out of broken windows at the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip, following a mass shooting at a music festival in Las Vegas. A lawyer for Las Vegas police told a judge on Jan. 16, 2018, that charges could be filed in connection with the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, even though the gunman is dead.
FBI spokeswoman Sandra Breault in Las Vegas declined to comment.
Federal court documents made public Friday showed that as of Oct. 6, the FBI considered Paddock’s girlfriend, Marilou Danley, “the most likely person who aided or abetted Stephen Paddock.”
Danley, who was in the Philippines during the shooting, was questioned by the FBI after returning to the U.S. Lombardo and Aaron Rouse, FBI agent in charge in Las Vegas, said in October that Danley was not a suspect.
An FBI spokeswoman said last week that she could not comment about Danley. Her lawyer, Matthew Lombard in Los Angeles, did not immediately respond to telephone and email messages Tuesday.
The judge Tuesday didn’t order the Vegas police records released as requested by a lawyer for media organizations, including The Associated Press. Cadish said she might review the documents privately before making them public.
“It only makes sense that a party who is arguing that something has to be kept secret can’t fully explain in public why it has to be kept secret,” she said.
Media companies want the judge to release affidavits showing what police told state judges to obtain search warrants immediately after identifying Paddock as the man who opened fire from a 32nd-floor suite of a casino-hotel into a country music festival crowd below.
Officials have not said and records released so far don’t show what motivated the 64-year-old high-stakes gambler to kill.
“Paddock planned the attack meticulously and took many methodical steps to avoid detection of his plot and to thwart the eventual law enforcement investigation that would follow” the shooting, one federal document said.
A U.S. judge on Friday unsealed more than 300 pages of FBI warrant records justifying searches of Paddock’s properties in Reno and Mesquite, Nevada, along with vehicles and multiple email, Facebook and other internet accounts belonging to Paddock and Danley.
Danley told investigators that they would find her fingerprints on bullets used during the attack because she would sometimes help Paddock load high-volume ammunition magazines, according to the FBI records.
Other records showed that Danley received a wire transfer of money from Paddock while she was in the Philippines and that Danley deleted her Facebook account in the hours immediately after the shooting.
Possible charges in connection with Vegas shooting, says lawyer | Toronto Sun
 
Alternative
#553
Very sad.
 
spaminator
#554
Las Vegas gunman researched SWAT tactics, but motive a mystery
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
January 19, 2018
Updated:
January 19, 2018 6:39 PM EST
By Ken Ritter And Mike Balsamo, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAS VEGAS — The Las Vegas gunman meticulously planned the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history, researching SWAT tactics, renting other hotel rooms overlooking outdoor concerts and investigating potential targets in at least four cities, authorities said Friday.
But almost four months after Stephen Paddock killed 58 people and wounded more than 800 others with a barrage of bullets from the Mandalay Bay casino-hotel, investigators still have not answered the key question: Why did he do it?
Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo released a preliminary report on the Oct. 1 attack and said he did not expect criminal charges to be filed against Paddock’s girlfriend, Marilou Danley, who had been called the only person of interest in the case. Investigators believe Paddock acted alone, and he did not leave a suicide note or manifesto.
Paddock, who killed himself before police reached him, told friends and relatives that he always felt ill, in pain and fatigued, authorities said.
His doctor thought he may have had bipolar disorder but told police that Paddock refused to discuss the possibility, the report said. The doctor offered him antidepressants, but Paddock accepted only a prescription for anxiety medication. He was fearful of medication and often refused to take it, the doctor told investigators.
During an interview with authorities, Paddock’s girlfriend said he had become “distant” in the year before the shooting and their relationship was no longer intimate.
Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo discusses the Route 91 Harvest Festival mass shooting during a news conference at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department headquarters, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018, in Las Vegas. (John Locher/AP Photo)
When they stayed at the Mandalay Bay together in September 2017, Paddock acted strangely, she told investigators. She remembered him constantly looking out the windows overlooking an area where the concert would be held the next month. He moved from window to window to see the site from different angles, the report said.
She described him as “germaphobic” and said he had strong reactions to smells.
The 64-year-old retired accountant was a high-stakes gambler and real estate investor. He had lost a “significant amount of wealth” since September 2015, which led to “bouts of depression,” the sheriff has said. But Paddock had paid off his gambling debts before the shooting, according to the report.
Prior to the attack, Paddock’s online searches included research into SWAT tactics and consideration of other potential public targets, including in Chicago, Boston and Santa Monica, California, the sheriff said.
His research also sought the number of attendees at other concerts in Las Vegas and the size of the crowds at Santa Monica’s beach. Among his searches was “do police use explosives,” the report said.
Four laptops and three cellphones were found inside his hotel suite. On one of the computers, investigators found hundreds of photos of child pornography.
The same computer was used to search for the height of the Mandalay Bay, how to remove hard drives from laptops, the location of gun shows in Nevada and information about several other Las Vegas casinos.
Paddock’s brother, Daniel Paddock, was arrested in Los Angeles in October in an unrelated child pornography investigation. He has pleaded not guilty.
Authorities have said they found no link between the attack and international terrorism.
Paddock fired more than 1,100 bullets, mostly from two windows on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel, into a crowd of 22,000 people attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival music below, Lombardo has said.
That includes about 200 shots fired through his hotel room door into a hallway where an unarmed hotel security guard was wounded in the leg and a maintenance engineer took cover.
Several bullets hit fuel storage tanks at nearby McCarran International Airport that did not explode. Authorities reported finding about 4,000 unused bullets in Paddock’s two-room suite, including incendiary rounds that Lombardo said were not used.
Investigators found 23 guns in the rooms, including 12 rifles fitted with “bump stock” devices that allowed rapid-fire shooting similar to fully automatic weapons. Dozens of guns were strewn around the room, some left inside a bassinet. Police also found a blue plastic hose with a fan on one end and a snorkel mouthpiece on the other end inside the room.
A federal grand jury is hearing evidence in a case that spun off from the shooting investigation. The FBI has “an ongoing case against an individual of federal interest,” Lombardo said, declining to elaborate.
Spokeswomen for the FBI and federal prosecutors in Las Vegas declined to comment.
Danley was in the Philippines at the time of the shooting. In the days before the attack, Paddock sent her a $100,000 wire transfer. She has said she found that odd and thought he might have been breaking up with her when he sent her the money and told her to use it to buy a home for her family there.
During an interview with the FBI after she returned from the Philippines, Danley volunteered that investigators would find her fingerprints on bullets used during the attack because she would sometimes help Paddock load high-volume ammunition magazines, according to FBI warrant documents.
Balsamo contributed from Los Angeles.
Las Vegas gunman researched SWAT tactics, but motive a mystery | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#555
Arizona man says he sold ammunition to Las Vegas shooter
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
January 30, 2018
Updated:
January 30, 2018 11:12 PM EST
In this Oct. 2, 2017, file photo, investigators load bodies from the scene of a mass shooting at a music festival near the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas. Chris Carlson / AP Photo
LAS VEGAS — An Arizona man named in court documents as a “person of interest” during the investigation of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history said Tuesday he had met the shooter one time and sold ammunition to him.
Douglas Haig told The Associated Press that he had been contacted earlier by investigators in the case.
Speaking at his suburban home in Mesa, Haig said he planned to hold a news conference later this week to answer questions about his name surfacing in the investigation.
“I am the guy who sold ammunition to Stephen Paddock,” Haig said without disclosing any details. Police say Paddock was the gunman and killed himself as officers converged on him.
A law enforcement official told the AP in October that Paddock bought 1,000 rounds of tracer ammunition from a private seller he met at a Phoenix gun show. The official spoke anonymously because they weren’t authorized to disclose case information. It was not immediately clear if that person was Haig.
Records show Haig owns Specialized Military Ammunition LLC. The company’s website says it sold tracer and incendiary ammunition but is now “closed indefinitely.”
Haig’s name emerged by mistake Tuesday when court documents were released nearly four months after the shooting.
The documents did not disclose why authorities considered Haig a person of interest.
Police officials did not respond to telephone, text and email messages about Haig from AP. FBI and U.S. attorney’s office spokeswomen in Las Vegas declined to comment.
The documents show that early in the investigation, police believed Paddock must have had help.
“Given the magnitude of the incident, it is reasonable to believe multiple suspects and months of planning were involved in this premeditated massacre,” said one search warrant request submitted to a judge nine days after the shooting stopped.
However, Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo released a preliminary report on Jan. 19 saying police and the FBI believe Paddock acted alone before he killed himself as police closed in.
It did not answer the key question: What made Paddock stockpile a cache of assault-style weapons and fire for about 10 minutes out the windows of Mandalay Bay hotel-casino into a crowd of 22,000 people.
Haig’s name was blacked out in the more than 270 pages of search warrant records released by a Nevada judge to The Associated Press, but remained on one page of documents provided to the Las Vegas Review-Journal.
The newspaper published the name online. Clark County District Court Judge Elissa Cadish later ordered the full document not be published without redactions, but she acknowledged she couldn’t order the newspaper to retract the name.
Authorities previously said an unnamed person could face unspecified federal charges in shooting that also injured more than 800 other people.
The warrants show that investigators found 23 rifles and a handgun in Paddock’s 32nd-floor hotel suite and an adjoining room. Police also found five suitcases, five rifle cases, binoculars, a spotter scope, portable solar generator and 1,050 empty bullet casings.
Police reported finding just $273 in cash in the room of the 64-year-old retired accountant who amassed a millionaire’s fortune, owned homes in Reno and Mesquite, Nevada, and earned casino perks wagering thousands of dollars on high-stakes video poker.
Authorities previously characterized Paddock as a gambler on a losing streak who was obsessed with cleanliness, may have been bipolar and was having difficulties with his live-in girlfriend.
The name of Paddock’s girlfriend, Marilou Danley, was not redacted from documents released Tuesday in response to a public records lawsuit filed by media companies including AP and the Review-Journal.
Danley was in the Philippines at the time of the attack and is co-operating with investigators.
She was initially considered a person of interest but authorities later said she is not likely to face criminal charges.
Separately, Clark County District Court Judge Timothy Williams ruled Tuesday that the coroner in Las Vegas should release autopsy records of Paddock and the people killed by gunfire, with victims’ names blacked out. Those documents were not immediately made public.
County Coroner John Fudenberg later released a statement later promising victims’ autopsy reports “as soon as possible.” But Paddock’s autopsy report was not final and would not be released until it is, the coroner said.
Fudenberg maintains the records are confidential, and restricts release to families and to police investigating deaths. The coroner and county attorneys didn’t immediately say whether they would appeal Williams’ ruling to the Nevada Supreme Court.
Margaret McLetchie, an attorney representing AP and the Review-Journal in the autopsies case, noted in court that Nevada state public records law does not directly address autopsies and that a deceased person has no legal right to privacy.
In Nevada, records are public unless the law says otherwise, she said.
Arizona man says he sold ammunition to Las Vegas shooter | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#556
Arizona man who sold ammunition to Las Vegas shooter is charged
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
February 2, 2018
Updated:
February 2, 2018 9:32 PM EST
This October, 2017 file photo released by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Force Investigation Team Report shows the kitchenette in the hotel room of Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock's 32nd floor room of the Mandalay Bay hotel in Las Vegas, an image released as part of a preliminary report by Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo on Friday, Jan. 19, 2018, in Las Vegas.Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department / AP
CHANDLER, Ariz. — An Arizona man who sold ammunition to the gunman who carried out the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history was charged Friday with manufacturing armour-piercing bullets, according to court documents.
Unfired armour-piercing bullets found inside the Las Vegas hotel room where Stephen Paddock launched the Oct. 1 attack had the fingerprints of ammunition dealer Douglas Haig, according to a criminal complaint filed in federal court in Phoenix. It says Haig didn’t have a license to manufacture armour-piercing ammunition.
Haig has acknowledged selling 720 rounds of tracer ammunition to Paddock in the weeks before the shooting that killed 58 people. Tracer bullets contain a pyrotechnic charge that illuminates the path of fired bullets so shooters can see whether their aim is correct.
The criminal charge involves another type of ammunition — armour-piercing bullets.
The documents don’t say if any ammunition tied to Paddock was used in the attack. Las Vegas police wouldn’t say whether armour-piercing bullets were used in the shooting but referred to a preliminary report saying some rifle magazines were loaded with armour-piercing ammunition.
Haig, a 55-year-old aerospace engineer who sold ammunition as a hobby for about 25 years, was charged 35 minutes before holding a news conference where he said he didn’t notice anything suspicious when he sold the tracer rounds to Paddock.
Haig told investigators that when Paddock bought the ammunition at his home in suburban Phoenix, Paddock went to his car to get gloves and put them on before taking the box from Haig, the complaint said.
“I had no contribution to what Paddock did,” Haig told reporters earlier Friday, adding that there was nothing unusual about the type or quantity of ammunition the shooter bought. “I had no way to see into his mind.”
A phone message left for Haig’s attorney, Marc Victor, wasn’t immediately returned.
In this Oct. 16, 2017, file photo, photos and notes adorn a wall at the Las Vegas Community Healing Garden in Las Vegas. The garden was built as a memorial for the victims of the recent mass shooting in Las Vegas. (John Locher/AP Photo)
The two armour-piercing bullets found in Paddock’s hotel room with Haig’s fingerprints had an “incendiary capsule” on their noses, the documents said. A forensic analysis of those two bullets had tool marks consistent with the equipment in Haig’s backyard workshop, according to the complaint.
It also alleges that FBI agents searching Haig’s home on Oct. 19 found armour-piercing ammunition.
The complaint said Haig sold such bullets in more than 100 instances to customers across the United States, including Nevada, Texas, Virginia, Wyoming and South Carolina.
He appeared in court Friday and was released under the condition he not possess guns or ammunition. If convicted, he could face up to five years in prison and a fine as high as $250,000.
Haig and his business partner, whose name wasn’t provided, sold 40 to 50 rounds of incendiary rounds to Paddock in late August at a Las Vegas gun show, according to the complaint.
The next month, Haig said he met Paddock at a Phoenix gun show and that he was well-dressed and polite.
He didn’t have the quantity of tracer ammunition on hand that Paddock was seeking, so Paddock contacted him several days later and lined up a sale at Haig’s home.
Haig said he was shocked and sickened when a federal agent informed him of the massacre 11 hours after it unfolded.
Haig’s lawyer said they held the news conference in a bid to protect his reputation after he was revealed earlier this week to be a “person of interest” in the investigation. Haig’s identity emerged by mistake after his name was not redacted in court documents.
A law enforcement official previously told The Associated Press that investigators don’t believe Haig had any involvement or knowledge of the planned attack when he sold ammunition to Paddock. The official wasn’t authorized to discuss an ongoing investigation and spoke on condition of anonymity.
Haig arose in the investigation when a box with his name and address was found in the Mandalay Bay hotel suite where Paddock opened fire on a music festival below.
He gave the box to Paddock to carry the 720 rounds of tracer ammunition from the sale.
Haig said Paddock told him that “he was going to go out to the desert to put on a light show, either with or for his friends. I can’t remember whether he used the word ‘with’ or ‘for.’ But he said that he was going out at night to shoot it with friends.”
Haig, who has closed his ammunition business, said he has received unwanted media attention and death threats since his name was released.
The FBI didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. The U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives referred questions to the U.S. attorney’s office in Las Vegas, which declined to comment.
Arizona man who sold ammunition to Las Vegas shooter is charged | Toronto Sun
 
Curious Cdn
#557
Armor piercing tracer bullets... There's a special clause in the Second Amendment of the RIGHT to bear armor piercing tracer bullets, if I'm not mistaken.
 
spaminator
#558
Las Vegas shooting victims’ families promised $275Gs | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#559
'IT ENRAGES ME': Vegas shooting victims outraged over MGM's lawsuit
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
July 23, 2018
Updated:
July 23, 2018 10:15 PM EDT
Fiorella Gaeta consoles her fiance Jason McMillan, a Riverside County Sheriff's deputy who was shot and paralyzed in the Oct, 1, 2017, Las Vegas shooting. Alex Gallardo / AP
NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. — Victims of a mass shooting at a Las Vegas country music festival said Monday they were outraged when they learned they were being sued by the company that owns the hotel where the gunman opened fire.
Jason McMillan, a 36-year-old Riverside County sheriff’s deputy who was shot and paralyzed, said he can’t believe MGM officials would try to foist blame onto anyone but themselves.
“I just can’t believe the audacity,” McMillan said at a press conference in Southern California where survivors, victims’ relatives and attorneys railed against the decision to file lawsuits against hundreds of victims.
“I’m not just a victim from the concert. I’m a survivor, and they’re not going to get away with anything. We’ll keep this going as long as it takes,” McMillan said.
MGM Resorts International sued victims in at least seven states last week in a bid to get federal courts to declare the company has no liability for the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.
In October, high-stakes gambler Stephen Paddock killed 58 people and injured hundreds at the festival by firing onto the crowd from his room at the Mandalay Bay casino-resort in Las Vegas. Paddock then killed himself.
MGM’s lawsuits — which target victims who have threatened to sue or who have sued the company and voluntarily dismissed their claims — argue that that the shooting qualifies as an act of terrorism and that federally certified security services were used at the concert venue, which is also owned by MGM.
After 9-11, the U.S. enacted a law giving companies a way to limit their liability if their federally certified products or services failed to prevent a terror attack.
The company’s decision to file the lawsuits stoked a public outcry. On Monday, MGM Resorts spokeswoman Debra DeShong said the company has faced dozens of lawsuits in multiple jurisdictions and resolving each case on its own would take years.
“We believe Congress determined these cases should be in federal court and that getting everyone in the same court is the best and fastest way to resolve these cases,” she said.
McMillan said he felt helpless at the concert when he fell to the ground and couldn’t feel his legs. His girlfriend helped drag his body over a fence and others helped load him onto the back of a pickup truck where he lay staring at the night sky, struggling to breathe, while the driver plowed over curbs and through bushes to rush him and other victims to the hospital.
When he woke, doctors told him he had a bullet in his spine. He was afraid his 4- and 7-year-old daughters would look at him differently in a wheelchair. He was afraid of what they might miss out on, he said, because of him.
It was insulting to learn he was being sued by MGM at the same time he was struggling to rebuild his life, McMillan said. And it brought him right back to feeling helpless again.
“It enrages me to think that this company can just try to skip out on their responsibilities and their liability for what happened,” he said.
http://torontosun.com/news/world/it-...r-mgms-lawsuit
 
Hoid
+1
#560
Jason McMillan, a 36-year-old Riverside County sheriff’s deputy who was shot and paralyzed, said he can’t believe MGM officials would try to foist blame onto anyone but themselves.

It's what President Trump does.

MAGA
 
Hoid
#561
https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/nat...jjN/story.html

They are closing the books on this one with no real conclusions.

They did find out he had lost about $1.5 million gambling over the previous 2 years.

It makes more sense then if he had won $1.5 million.