American votes in Canadian elections


I think not
#1
U of T student conducts `test'

Casts ballot in Trinity-Spadina
Jan. 25, 2006. 01:00 AM
LESLIE FERENC
STAFF REPORTER

An American student and budding journalist who wanted to expose flaws in Canada's voter registration system says he can't believe how easy it was to register and vote Monday.

Peter Cunningham, 21, is from Michigan and studying at the University of Toronto on a student visa. While volunteering at a downtown polling station during the campaign, he said, he was shocked to learn proof of citizenship wasn't required for electors whose names were not on the voters list. He said he decided to conduct an experiment and went to a polling station in Trinity-Spadina riding, where he lives. Since he wasn't on the voters list, Cunningham said he was asked to show identification bearing his name, signature and address. He said he presented officials his student card and a hydro bill before he was handed a ballot. According to Cunningham, he was never asked his age or whether he was a citizen.

"Simply put, the rules for registration are too lax," he wrote in a piece he sent to the Star hoping it would be published. "... Non-registered voters need not provide proof of their citizenship while those who are already registered can cast their votes without even providing election officials with ID," he continued. "They simply need to point to their name on a list and provide a signature. The potential for fraud is so immense that ignoring it would suggest nothing short of incompetence on the part of election officials."

Liberal incumbent Tony Ianno, who lost his seat in Trinity-Spadina, wouldn't comment. Newly elected New Democrat Olivia Chow could not be reached for comment.

Elections Canada spokesperson Nathalie De Montigny said it is illegal for anyone who is not a Canadian citizen to vote. "The law is the law. You have to be 18 years old as of election day and a Canadian citizen to vote.... "

Anyone providing false information could be charged and fined up to $5,000 or jailed for five years or both, De Montigny continued, adding she couldn't comment on the specific case.

Link
 
DasFX
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not

U of T student conducts `test'

Casts ballot in Trinity-Spadina
Jan. 25, 2006. 01:00 AM
LESLIE FERENC
STAFF REPORTER

An American student and budding journalist who wanted to expose flaws in Canada's voter registration system says he can't believe how easy it was to register and vote Monday.

I worked as a deputy returning officer on Monday and it truely is a joke at how easy anyone can vote. If you are registered, all you need is your card and that is it. If you don't have your card, you just need to state your name, although I still asked for ID. As for citizenship, there is no safeguard against to ensure only Canadians vote.

Really anybody can vote, it is fairly easy to even vote multiple times if you really wanted to. We need to a government issued voter's card, and there must be strict enforcement at the polls. Elections Canada is too accomodating to people because they want people to vote that they cannot maintain the integrity of voting requirements.
 
annabattler
#3
Come to think of it,I don't ever have any identification that shows I'm a Canadian citizen.
Most people don't carry their passport with them...so how exactly could one prove citizenship?
 
I think not
#4
In New York State, while registering, you have to provide proof of citizenship, by way of birth certificate, naturalization documents or passport, otherwise you can't register to vote. On election day all you need is a drivers license.
 
missile
Conservative
#5
I carry my Social Insurance card,my Medicare card and my birth certificate with me always..and the previous election-was refused the right to vote because I didn't have enough proof for the asshole running the polling booth That was the first and only time in 40 years that I didn't exercise my voting rights.
 
I think not
#6
Missile I don't understand, if you had previously voted, wouldn't you be registered already?
 
tracy
#7
I voted as an absentee voter this year and it was the only time I had to prove citizenship.
 
Canucks fan
#8
I registered at the polling station as well. It was incredibly easy to do so. I live on campus and that's where the polling station was. All I showed was my drivers license, and the key to my mailbox to proove where I live.
 
zoofer
#9
As usual the pendulum has swung too far in the wrong direction. It time to change direction.
When you become a Canadian citizen, either by choice or accident of birth, heh heh, then your social insurance number should be tattooed on your chest.
As a Registration Officer I would check at least 50% of the wanabe voters.
 
Jay
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by zoofer

As a Registration Officer I would check at least 50% of the wanabe voters.

Even me, Zoof? :P
 
missile
Conservative
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not

Missile I don't understand, if you had previously voted, wouldn't you be registered already?

I hadn't received the voter's card that time & was left off the list .
 
zoofer
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Jay

Quote: Originally Posted by zoofer

As a Registration Officer I would check at least 50% of the wanabe voters.

Even me, Zoof? :P

I was assuming half the voters were females. Now if you showed up in drag........
 
Lotuslander
#13
Quote:

An American student and budding journalist who wanted to expose flaws in Canada's voter registration system says he can't believe how easy it was to register and vote Monday.

Peter Cunningham, 21, is from Michigan and studying at the University of Toronto on a student visa. While volunteering at a downtown polling station during the campaign, he said, he was shocked to learn proof of citizenship wasn't required for electors whose names were not on the voters list. He said he decided to conduct an experiment and went to a polling station in Trinity-Spadina riding, where he lives. Since he wasn't on the voters list, Cunningham said he was asked to show identification bearing his name, signature and address. He said he presented officials his student card and a hydro bill before he was handed a ballot. According to Cunningham, he was never asked his age or whether he was a citizen.

"Simply put, the rules for registration are too lax," he wrote in a piece he sent to the Star hoping it would be published. "... Non-registered voters need not provide proof of their citizenship while those who are already registered can cast their votes without even providing election officials with ID," he continued. "They simply need to point to their name on a list and provide a signature. The potential for fraud is so immense that ignoring it would suggest nothing short of incompetence on the part of election officials."

When you go and register to vote you are asked to sign a document which states in the fine print that by signing you are eligible to cast a ballot. Therefore by signing you are declaring that you live in the address, are a Canadian citizen are over 18 years of age and have not voted previously in the election nor will vote for a second time at another polling station- you are making a legal declaration by signing. Unfortunately what this U of T student did was fraud. Anyway i don't know where this Yank gets off trying to tell us that our voter registration system is too lax. Perhaps it is but, at least we don't have the debacle of hanging chads. Or presidents elected by the recently deceased, which is how good ole LBJ won re-election in 64. Now that truly is a case of lax registration rules.
 
jimmoyer
#14
Oh c'mon !!!

The fallacy of any of us is to think we're better than others !!!

Given many of the same circumstances, there but for the
grace of God go I.

Give it a break, Lotuslander, all election systems are not
bullet proof and perhaps you need somebody to point
that out in a painful way, because you got too used
to thinking you were better than your big gangly southern neighbor.
 
FiveParadox
Liberal
#15
I had to sign a document when I registered for this election (turned eighteen only four days before the Thirty-ninth Election, lol), and it said that I was declaring that I was a citizen, eighteen years old, would vote only once, et cetera, and that if I signed that thing that I would be bound to the information I gave under penalty of perjury.

Elections Canada should pursue this person and have him charged.
 
jimmoyer
#16
Actually the Canadian electoral administrators should
thank this guy for doing THEIR JOB.
 
FiveParadox
Liberal
#17
If he cast a vote in our election, then he should not be thanked, but rather charged with electoral fraud . It is not the job of Elections Canada to cast fraudulent votes, is it?

It is the responsibility of whomsoever signs the registration paper, stating certain information, to ensure that such information is true Elections Canada cannot be held liable for persons who would blatently lie.
 
tawker
#18
Well, I heard of SEVERAL 17 and 16 year old Canadian citizens recieving voter registration cards this election. Some of them exercised their democratic right to vote. They *are* Canadian citizens after all.

If one refers to paragraph III of the Charter, their legal defense would be simply contained within the line

" 3. Every citizen of Canada has the right to vote in an election of members of the House of Commons or of a legislative assembly and to be qualified for membership therein."

If a judge would be able to state that those tax paying Canadian citzens were not Canadian citizens.

Non Canadians voting I have a problem with, but Canadian citizens, regardless of age, are no problem to me at all. If one can pay taxes, one can vote. Our friends to the south had a war over that simple point.
 
jimmoyer
#19
Oh for gawd's sakes FiveParadox, you're too stiff about this.

Electoral administrators are notorious for not examining
the blind spots in their own procedures.

I've seen this everywhere. Haven't YOU ???

Give the guy a medal.

Appoint a group to follow up with recommendations
and close the gap.
 
FiveParadox
Liberal
#20
Whatever his intentions may have been, the fact remains that he committed a violation of federal law by voting where he was not authorized to do so.
 
jimmoyer
#21
The guy did the job your own parliament should do.
The guy did the job any one of your citizens should do.

Go ahead. Prosecute.

The next step is nothing.

Because that's what's gonna happen.

Nothing.

Don't change a thing.

Just like the States.

Very little change or introspection in the
mechanics of elections is happening.
 
FiveParadox
Liberal
#22
I was not saying that Elections Canada should not strengthen its protocols and procedures you are putting words in my mouth, and painting me as some irresponsible good-for-nothing.

Notwithstanding whether or not he brought "red flag" issues to the forefront, the fact remains that he voted, and had his vote counted, without being authorized to do so, violating the Canada Elections Act he does not have the right to do so.
 
jimmoyer
#23
My apologies, FiveParadox.

We had some guy on his own check out airport security.
We saw the same public outcry to put the guy in jail.

Both the guy who exposed a weakness in your
election procedures and our airport security
did one thing : They publicized their action.

It's always this kind of guy that does so much
better exposing the myths of comfort we have.

Rarely do you ever see paid government workers do
this. And if they do, they get to watch the upper
echelons do little about it.
 
tawker
#24
Our registration system is a total joke, our voting system is antiquated.

I have no problems with a voter checkable electronic voting machine. If it can be tracked, it's fine and it might speed things up a bit having an digital record at the polling station.
 
FiveParadox
Liberal
#25
Our voting system gets us results quite quickly, in my opinion; less than a few hours after the stations have been closed, we know what our next Parliament of Canada is going to look like.
 
tawker
#26
<rant>

Don't forget the (very very easy to defeat) gag laws that prevent us from getting results in BC seconds after they come out.

The scary thing was, the CBC was broadcasting results online during the election and it wasn't hard to find on the blog-o-sphere (and those commenters who kept posting results on my blog, argh - totally ironic, the CBC posts a link saying that I said I was going to comply then posts a link with the comments page that users posted results on. Oh well, I made a couple bucks off adsense so it was ok.


</rant>
 

Similar Threads

28
Too American to be Canadian?
by Curiosity | Jan 8th, 2006