Russia Plans to Use Prison Labor for 2018 World Cup


B00Mer
#1
Russia Plans to Use Prison Labor for 2018 World Cup



MOSCOW Russian authorities want to use prison labor to drive down the costs of holding the 2018 World Cup.

The Russian prison service is backing a bid by Alexander Khinshtein, a lawmaker from the ruling United Russia party, to allow prisoners to be taken from their camps to work at factories, with a focus on driving down the costs of building materials for World Cup projects.

"It'll help in the sense that there will be the opportunity to acquire building materials for a lower price, lower than there is currently on the market," Khinshtein told The Associated Press. "And apart from that it'll make it possible to get prisoners into work, which is very positive."

Russian prison labor schemes have faced allegations that prisoners are routinely underpaid or forced to work long hours. In 2013, the then-imprisoned ***** Riot band member Nadezhda Tolokonnikova went on hunger strike in protest at working conditions in her prison camp.

Russia's Federal Penitentiary Service has been working with Khinshtein to draw up the proposals, said the lawmaker, adding that they will be submitted to parliament soon.

The service declined to comment on the plan when contacted by the AP on Monday, but deputy director Alexander Rudy told the Kommersant business newspaper that his agency was keen to use prisoners for "tasks that, let's say, wouldn't appeal to the ordinary citizen."

Workers' rights are a hot-button issue for World Cup organizer FIFA, which is under pressure over the high rate of deaths among migrant workers in 2022 host nation Qatar.

When asked about the Russian plans to use prison labor, FIFA spokesperson Delia Fischer told the AP: "We have not received any information on the below mentioned plans yet and as such cannot comment for the time being."

Russia's move toward prison labor comes at a time when the World Cup budget of 637.6 billion rubles ($12.7 billion) is under pressure after the ruble dropped in value compared to last year, making imported materials more expensive. The ruble has recovered much of its lost value this year, but is still worth around a third less against the dollar than at the start of 2014, before international sanctions and a drop in the price of oil dented the Russian economy.

Khinshtein said his plan to employ prisoners was "of course" an extension of the government's policy of so-called import replacement, under which Russian-made production is expanded to fill the gap left by costly imports.

The workers would continue to live in their prison camps and would be transported to their place of work each day. A typical wage for a prisoner on such projects might be 15,000 rubles ($300) a month, Khinshtein said.

There are no plans as yet to employ prisoners on World Cup stadium construction sites, he added.

source: http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015...abor.html?_r=0
 
MHz
#2
I expect the homeless will be trying to get tossed into that prison intentionally.
 
petros
+1
#3  Top Rated Post
That low on cash huh?
 
MHz
#4
How much cash do you think the homeless have in Russia?

The rest of the workforce is already employed doing other things like mining and building rail lines. A soccer game only gets top priority in NATO countries.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#5
Yay Putin! He's such a wonderful leader.
 
MHz
#6
So are we, you can count the smiling faces on one hand.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sp5N4O93u50
 
Blackleaf
#7
Had Fifa awarded the 2018 World Cup to the country which had the best bid - England (which Fifa officials have even admitted) - then it would have awarded the World Cup to a country with most of the hi-tech, modern stadia and infrastructure already built. There would have been almost no construction work having to take place.

Yet Russia, like Qatar for 2022, was awarded it because it's oil-rich.
 
MHz
+1
#8
Meaning they will still be around in 2018, no such guarantee with the UK being a debtor nation.
 
Blackleaf
#9
It's the Europa League Final tonight, between Dnipro and the holders Sevilla at the National Stadium in Warsaw.

Dnipro are from the Ukraine. They've never won a major European trophy - their previous best showing in Europe was reaching the Quarter Finals of what is now the Champions League in 1985 and 1990 - so if they win tonight against last year's winners then I'm sure it'll be a much-needed boost not only to their supporters but to millions of Ukrainians, who have been suffering in the conflict with Russia.

I just have to decide whether to watch this match or tonight's episode of Springwatch, because both are on at the same time.

 
B00Mer
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Meaning they will still be around in 2018, no such guarantee with the UK being a debtor nation.

Now that was funny.. you're like a Hypernova, not very bright, but once in a while there is a burst of light.
 
Blackleaf
#11
Springwatch or Europa League Final....Springwatch or Europa League Final....Springwatch or Europa League Final....Springwatch or Europa League Final............. hard decision.
 
MHz
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Now that was funny.. you're like a Hypernova, not very bright, but once in a while there is a burst of light.

You just experienced an event horizon moment, life will never be the same.
 
Sons of Liberty
+1
#13
Prisoners make for great concrete aggregate.
 
Ludlow
#14
kick the ball in the net. put the ball thru the hoop. Knock the ball in the hole with a stick. Hit the ball over the fence with a bat.
 
Nuggler
#15
Bunch of FIFA executives arrested. Wonder if they'll wind up on the chain gang !
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Sons of Liberty View Post

Prisoners make for great concrete aggregate.

True. Look at the nice wall they built with stones and corpses in 300.