Medicare Celebrates 50 years today.


petros
#1
July 1 is the anniversary of the Saskatchewan Medical Care Insurance Act

Sunday is the 50th anniversary of the arrival of medicare in Saskatchewan. It was a pivotal , but divisive moment in Saskatchewan's history that even led to a doctors' strike.

When the Saskatchewan Medical Care Insurance Act took effect, many of the province's doctor's responded by staging what's known famously as the Doctors' Strike of 1962. Massive rallies were held at the legislature, and the debate divided the province.

Former Premier Roy Romanow was a student and active in the NDP at the time.

"There were huge rallies, and excessive statements made by both sides, I suspect, of the issue," said Romanow.

The big issue was that doctors feared the loss of control of their profession.

"There was this feeling that the payment - that is, how you get paid - would somehow interfere with the doctor/patient relationship," said Howard Leeson from the University of Regina.

In hindsight, Leeson said you wonder what the fuss was about given that public service existed elsewhere, like in public education. He added it's hard to understand the controversy now given that medicare is part of our makeup.

Doctor Noel Doig said Tommy Douglas even acknowledged the strike wasn't about money. Dr. Doig practiced at the time, and insists that clinics were still running during the strike and patients were getting treatment.

"There's no reference anywhere," said Dr. Doig, "of a patient being turned away and being refused services."

Dr. Doig has written a book documenting that, trying to change the perception of the strike. It cites a woman confirming her child had an appendicitis despite media reports to the contrary.

Romanow remembers that it came down to values that still ring true for many today.

"Is health care a social good? Or is health care a commodity to be sold and purchased?" said Romanow.

Leeson calls the 1962 Doctors' Strike a defining moment in Saskatchewan's history. An agreement between the government and the doctors was finally reached after 23 days. That marked the basis for medicare, which many Canadians still feel proud about today.
 
taxslave
+4
#2  Top Rated Post
"Is health care a social good? Or is health care a commodity to be sold and purchased?" said Romanow.


I think a it of both.
 
Tonington
+3
#3
Definitely both.
 
damngrumpy
#4
I believe it is a social benefit first and foremost. Look at the United States they see
people losing everything they have because the are neither rich or really poor.
That clearly demonstrates the societal injustice that exists when its a bought and
sold commodity. Now should the Government manage and run it all? The ideal
answer would be yes, but we know that is not in the best interests of the public
either. I think the direction and concept management such as what are the goals,
should be govenment day to day management should be at arms length.
Managed care American style NO.
 
taxslave
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpy View Post

I believe it is a social benefit first and foremost. Look at the United States they see
people losing everything they have because the are neither rich or really poor.
That clearly demonstrates the societal injustice that exists when its a bought and
sold commodity. Now should the Government manage and run it all? The ideal
answer would be yes, but we know that is not in the best interests of the public
either. I think the direction and concept management such as what are the goals,
should be govenment day to day management should be at arms length.
Managed care American style NO.

Meaning along the lines of private enterprise with a single payer?
 

Similar Threads