So Dem. Elizabeth Warren is Native American eh?


Locutus
#1
Massachusetts senate hopeful Elizabeth Warren described herself in law-school professional directories as a Native American minority from 1986 to 1995.

The white Democratic candidate has so far offered no evidence that she is, in fact, part Native American, suggesting that she may have falsified that ethnic credential to advance her academic career in the early affirmative-action era. But “it is true,” a Warren spokeswoman told The Daily Caller on Monday, “and we’re working on digging up some sort of evidence to appease you.”

Another Warren spokeswoman shot back at the campaign of incumbent Republican Sen. Scott Brown, whom Warren is challenging for the senate seat once held by the late Ted Kennedy.

“If Scott Brown has questions about Elizabeth Warren’s well-known qualifications — from her high marks as a teacher to her nationally recognized work on bankruptcy and the pressures on middle class families — he ought to ask them directly instead of hiding behind the nasty insinuations of his campaign and trying to score political points,” spokeswoman Mindy Myers said in a statement.

Harvard University’s decision to promote Warren as a minority faculty member brought the issue front-and-center, but the Boston Herald reported Monday that Warren described herself that way when she taught at the University of Texas and the University of Pennsylvania.

American law school directories listed Warren as a minority professor for nine years before Harvard scooped her up, and Harvard apparently used that information to promote her as a minority, the Herald first reported Friday. (RELATED: More on Elizabeth Warren)

Warren’s campaign claims she did not know Harvard was promoting her as its law school’s only Native American professor and one of only a handful of “minority” faculty members. She does have Native American blood, the campaign said, but didn’t use that to get her job at Harvard.

Read more: Elizabeth Warren | Native American Heritage | Harvard Directories | The Daily Caller




This could be good.
 
Most helpful post: The members here have rated this post as best reply.
karrie
No Party Affiliation
+6
#2  Top Rated Post
Interestingly enough, my husband's aunt and I were just recently discussing ancestry issues, as when her daughter applied to university, she put that she had native ancestry on the forms. Her mom is native, so, she is, right? But, because her mom was adopted by a white family, there's no proper record of any treaty rights (go figure, the gov not holding onto paperwork like that hey?), and since she's blonde haired, blue eyed and has a white name, the uni essentially said she's just making it up to try to get money (even though without treaty, there's no money to get as far as they know). No... it couldn't be that she was just being honest about her ancestral background hey?
 
Locutus
+1
#3
This broad says she can't remember representing herself as a minority eh.

Whatever.

If what the genealogist found is in fact true, that still makes her 31/32nd sneaky biatch.
 
karrie
No Party Affiliation
+1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Locutus View Post

This broad says she can't remember representing herself as a minority eh.

Whatever.

If what the genealogist found is in fact true, that still makes her 31/32nd sneaky biatch.

Where does it say she doesn't remember saying it was her heritage?

She did say she wasn't aware that the university was advertising her heritage (would you assume your employer broadcasts yours?), but I don't see how that amounts to what you're implying.
 
CDNBear
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

(would you assume your employer broadcasts yours?)

I wouldn't assume it, but I have been referred to as "Token" by more than one employer.
 
gerryh
+3
#6
Yer a token a lot of things.
 
CDNBear
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryh View Post

Yer a token a lot of things.

Meh, smoking Kinicinic in a pipe isn't really considered tokin'.
 
Locutus
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

Where does it say she doesn't remember saying it was her heritage?

She did say she wasn't aware that the university was advertising her heritage (would you assume your employer broadcasts yours?), but I don't see how that amounts to what you're implying.


A google search for the current topic at hand brought me this. From a day after the article in this thread.



BOSTON—A genealogist in Massachusetts has uncovered evidence that Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren does have Native American heritage as she claims.

Christopher Child of the New England Historic and Genealogy Society said Monday he found an 1894 document in which Warren's great-great-great grandmother is listed as Cherokee, which would make the Harvard Law School professor 1/32nd American Indian. Child says more research is needed.

Warren is the likely challenger to Republican U.S. Sen. Scott Brown.

Questions have arisen over whether Warren has represented herself as a minority during her academic career. She says she doesn't remember doing so.

Warren says she wasn't aware that Harvard had listed her as a Native American faculty member in the 1990s.


Brown's campaign manager says the situation "raises serious questions" about Warren's credibility.


In Mass, document supports Warren's Cherokee claim - Boston.com
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
#9
Many of us have native blood somewhere in the family tree if the tree has been in N. America for any length of time. I'm almost as pale as she is and yet my grandmother was at least half Cherokee. In any event one does not have to be a Cherokee by blood to be a Cherokee citizen.
 
Locutus
#10
Paleface: University of Pennsylvania Listed Elizabeth Warren as a “Minority” When She Taught There — Inexplicably the University of Texas Listed Her as “White”


(Boston.com) — A second law school, the University of Pennsylvania, has touted Elizabeth Warren as a minority faculty member in an official school publication, according to an online document obtained by the Globe.

The University of Pennsylvania, where Warren taught at the law school from 1987 through 1995, listed her as a minority in a “Minority Equity Report” posted on its website. The report, published in 2005, well after her departure, included her as the winner of a faculty award in 1994. Her name was highlighted in bold, the designation used for minorities in the report.
A spokesman for the law school did not immediately return a phone message today.

The reference offers another piece of evidence that Warren was identified as a Native American as part of her professional career. Warren has said she was unaware that Harvard University, her current employer, had described her as a Native American when it was under fire for a lack of diversity on its law school faculty.

Warren has said she has long believed she has Native American ancestry, based on family lore, but has not documented the connection and is not enrolled in a tribe. One genealogist has found evidence that Warren is 1/32 Cherokee. Faculty and deans from each of the law schools where she has taught have said her ancestry was not a factor in her hiring.
The Warren campaign today pointed to a previous statement from Stephen Burbank, a professor and former dean at Penn law School who helped recruit her to the faculty there.

“Her appointment was based on the excellence of her scholarship and teaching. I do not know whether members of the faculty were even aware of her ancestry, but I am confident that it played no role whatsoever in her appointment,” Burbank said in a statement last week. Burbank donated $250 to Warren’s campaign in December.

Meanwhile, the Globe has also obtained a portion of Warren’s 1973 application to Rutgers, where she attended law school. That document specifically asks: “Are you interested in applying for admission under the Program for Minority Group Students?” Warren answered “no.”

In addition, a newly unearthed University of Texas personnel document shows that Warren listed herself as “white” when she taught at the law school there from 1981 to 1991.

The undated document, obtained by the Globe through a public records request, supports Warren’s statement that she did not present herself as a Native American when hired for the job. But it leaves open the question of why she later listed herself as a minority in a legal directory that is often consulted by hiring deans.

Warren’s employment document at the University of Texas allowed her to check multiple boxes specifying “the racial category or categories with which you most closely identify.” The options included “American Indian or Alaskan Native,” but she chose only white. The form was probably not filled out by Warren until soon after she was hired, within a year, according to Annela M. Lopez, senior administrative associate in the office of the vice president and chief financial officer.
Keep reading. . .




Weasel Zippers » Blog Archive » Paleface: University of Pennsylvania Listed Elizabeth Warren as a






Maybe this broad was 'evolving'.

 
EagleSmack
#11
But wait there's more!

Her Great-Great-Great Grand Dad was part of the East Tennessee Mounted Militia that helped round up the Cherokee's and sent them off on the Trail of Tears!

Oh Elisabeth say it isn't so!
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
+2
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

But wait there's more!

Her Great-Great-Great Grand Dad was part of the East Tennessee Mounted Militia that helped round up the Cherokee's and sent them off on the Trail of Tears!

Oh Elisabeth say it isn't so!

I'll bet that made family dinners awkward!
 
Colpy
Conservative
+1
#13


Obviously, you missed this!!!
 
EagleSmack
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by SLM View Post

I'll bet that made family dinners awkward!

Why.... eventually they just said they were Native Americans instead of "Indian Fighters" when it become convenient to do so.
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

Why.... eventually they just said they were Native Americans instead of "Indian Fighters" when it become convenient to do so.

Sure, because that's practically the same thing right?
 
Locutus
#16
Good ol' Rex.



The shame of Fauxcohontas



When is a politician toast — done-on-both-sides, pass-the-butter-and-jam toast? Well, one hint might be when you show up on blogs and in newspapers photoshopped as the Lone Ranger’s great Indian sidekick Tonto. Another might be when thousands of people spend hours making up sarcastic names for you, such as “Fauxcohontas,” or more brutally, “Dances with Lies.”

This is the unfortunate lot of Harvard Law professor Elizabeth Warren, a Massachusetts Democrat running for a senate seat in Ted Kennedy’s old district. During the course of the campaign it was revealed that Ms. Warren had listed her minority status in law school faculty directories, and that no less than the Harvard Crimson in 1998 declared in print that: “Harvard Law School currently has only one tenured minority woman, Gottlieb Professor of Law Elizabeth Warren, who is Native American.”
There is no need, thankfully, to go into all the back and forth this has excited. The key points are that Ms. Warren, on the campaign trail and after some initial confusion, vehemently denied “using” her minority heritage to get hired at any university, let alone Harvard. But she still wanted to make very clear her intense pride in her “native heritage.”

She knew she was native American, or part native American, because it was “family lore” that her great-great-great grandmother — “like all Indians” — had “high cheek bones.” She laughably claims she only listed herself as “minority” in those law directories in the hopes of grabbing a “lunch” with “others like her.”

“Like her”? Her family’s lore, if accepted as fact, makes her at most 1/32nd native. How useful can it possibly be to be 1/32nd of anything while searching for a dining companion of similar status? When dealing with fractions so small, breaking bread with a total stranger still almost guarantees at least one thing in common. How wonderful for her to enjoy such an abundance of choice when seeking comfortably familiar lunch-time acquaintances.

This bizarre comedy highlights the ugly absurdity that arises when people, or institutions, become so absorbed with the question of race that it eclipses their common sense. But what’s perhaps most telling is how all involved — the candidate herself, the faculties and administrations of various law schools, everyone — step back in pure shock, nay, horror, from the very notion that Elizabeth Warren may have been hired for any other reason than her professional qualifications. Race? Nothing to do with it. Minority hire? Never!

Everybody acting like affirmative action hires are something to be ashamed of and denied, something rudely pushed aside as unthinkable, is baffling. In every other context, affirmative action and its attendant policies and protocols are looked upon as the secular world’s highest forms of public virtue. Companies and institutions boast about their so-called equity policies and minority placements. Does not every university, in every hire, on every bulletin board, and in every online notice — spell out every so proudly that applications from minorities and special groups will be given “special” attention, or are specifically urged to hire. Does this not right historical wrongs? Is this not part of enriching the educational experience?

And yet, any suggestion that a particular individual may have benefitted from these wonders of our modern age is treated as a slap in the face to said individual. How can a policy be a triumph in enactment but an insult in execution?

I think it’s because, at the highest levels of the educational system, even those who ostensibly support the policy know it’s hollow and false, or at least that it has outgrown what tenuous utility or point it might once have had. Even the systems that use affirmative action, the employers who trot it out so ostentatiously, and the politicians who continue to maintain it, know also that it constitutes a form of inequity in itself.

Perhaps, finally, people are waking up to the idea of how pernicious it is to see individuals — in all their scattered, singular, unrepeatable, distinct and uniquely shaped lives — only through the lens of some static racial or historical construct. We steal from the glory of individuals as individuals when we broker their careers or their lives through this blunt and reductive category of group identity.
Whatever becomes of Warren’s election bid, this episode has, I think, fatally wounded the hitherto unquestioned status of affirmative action. It has revealed it as open to corruption, and something that even successful people deny if it involves them. The story of Fauxcohontas may have some value beyond pure laughter after all.




shamelessly copied from:


Elizabeth Warren: The shame of Fauxcohontas | Full Comment | National Post
 
CDNBear
#17
Oh phew!

There it is!
 
EagleSmack
#18
“Harvard University may not be the only school that thought Massachusetts Democratic Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren was a Native American. In 1994, one year before she joined the faculty at Harvard, Warren won the prestigious Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching from the University of Pennsylvania, where she was teaching at the time. Eleven years later, the Minority Equity Committee of the University of Pennsylvania published a report that listed every winner of the award since 1991 and highlighted the names of minority recipients — including Elizabeth Warren’s.”

She's been claiming minority status and taking awards from minorities for quite some time now.

Quote: Originally Posted by Locutus View Post


“Like her”? Her family’s lore, if accepted as fact, makes her at most 1/32nd native. How useful can it possibly be to be 1/32nd of anything while searching for a dining companion of similar status? When dealing with fractions so small, breaking bread with a total stranger still almost guarantees at least one thing in common. How wonderful for her to enjoy such an abundance of choice when seeking comfortably familiar lunch-time acquaintances.

One thing you must know. The research claiming her to have 1/32 Cherokee blood was a computer file that said her G-G-G-Great grandmother was a Cherokee. A COMPUTER file! The actual documents were found and the word Cherokee was not listed anywhere and her G-G-G- Grandmother was listed as white in all primary documents.

Her staff is saying the computer files are proof enough.
 

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