Little Tori's murderers Charged.


JLM
+2
#91
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

Tori Stafford's convicted murderer Michael Rafferty blames Terri-Lynne McClintic in appeal
Allison Jones,THE CANADIAN PRESS
First posted: Sunday, October 23, 2016 10:16 AM EDT | Updated: Sunday, October 23, 2016 10:43 AM EDT
TORONTO — The man convicted of killing eight-year-old Victoria Stafford seven years ago will ask Ontario’s top court for a new trial Monday, trying to pin the blame on his accomplice.
Michael Rafferty was sentenced to life in prison in 2012 with no chance of parole for 25 years for kidnapping, sexual assault causing bodily harm and first-degree murder in the death of the Woodstock, Ont., girl.
His former girlfriend, Terri-Lynne McClintic, pleaded guilty in 2010 to first-degree murder, initially telling police Rafferty killed the girl, but testifying at his trial that she delivered the fatal blows.
Rafferty’s lawyer, Paul Calarco, argues in documents filed with the Court of Appeal for Ontario that the judge made several errors, including failing to warn the jury against relying on the testimony of McClintic, “a person of unsavoury character, with a serious history of violence and lying.”
Tori Stafford's convicted murderer Michael Rafferty blames Terri-Lynne McClintic


Totally f**king sickening. A little extra cash for the mouth piece I guess. Both these creatures are death sentence material, if only the law would allow.
 
petros
+1
#92
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I've advocated the proper punishment for those monsters for years, but not many people want it anymore - would rather pay to feed, clothe and house them.

Let them suffer in their own stench for 23hrs a day never speaking to another human other than guards? Death sounds like an easy out.
 
JLM
+1
#93
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Let them suffer in their own stench for 23hrs a day never speaking to another human other than guards? Death sounds like an easy out.


True!
 
lone wolf
+2
#94
The SOB should get some extra shyte heaped upon him for disturbing Tori's restful peace. Let karma hang the girlfriend and do your time like a man
 
spaminator
+1
#95
'I felt that I was there'; Tori Stafford juror traumatized by 'not being able to save her'
By Jane Sims , The London Free Press
First posted: Monday, November 07, 2016 08:52 AM EST | Updated: Tuesday, November 08, 2016 02:00 AM EST
The jury’s trip to the place where Woodstock school girl Tori Stafford was murdered was considered by the Crown to be a necessity.
It was seen as crucial at Michael Rafferty’s trial, along with a lot of the toughest evidence to hear and see, to bring the jury to that quiet, peaceful place near Mount Forest and to corroborate the evidence of star witness and Rafferty’s co-murderer Terri-Lynne McClintic.
It was a beautiful sunny day in 2012, recalled Kevin Gowdey, the now-retired former Elgin County Crown attorney and director of Crown operations in Ontario’s west region, when the jury arrived on a bus and quietly walked through where the eight-year-old was bludgeoned to death.
“We knew it would be difficult for them and traumatic, but it’s a moment I won’t forget — the picture of us standing there in silence as the jury arrived on the scene, following the instructions they’d been given,” said Gowdey, who was part of the prosecution team.
One juror brought some purple flowers — the colour was Tori’s favourite — that were briefly placed on the spot where the little girl’s body was found three months after she disappeared in 2009, bringing the tragedy home “in a real and powerful way.”
“It really was surreal,” Gowdey said. “I signed up for a job that involved being subjected to horrors and other people’s traumas, but the jurors didn’t.”
For months after, a 57-year-old woman, one of the Rafferty case jurors, played the scene in a looping video in her mind. Only, she could add all of the horrible details of the girl’s death that were placed before her for almost three months in a London courtroom.
“What would play in my head (was) I was standing at the edge by the fence, watching all this happening and not being able to save her,” the London woman said.
The juror, whose identity is protected by court order, is heading to Ontario’s highest court on Tuesday, in a landmark case, hoping to overturn a divisional court ruling that denied her victim’s compensation for her post-traumatic stress disorder developed after hearing and seeing the grisly details of the case.
That included photos of the crime scene, detailed forensic evidence and the chilling testimony of a confessed murderer, McClintic.
The woman has stepped forward to describe the vicarious trauma experienced by some jurors who must listen to the most gruesome and violent evidence in the worst cases. And she says she’s not alone.
“When you’re going through this, because it’s day after day and for so long, I felt that I was there, almost like a brainwash,” she said in a recent interview.
She described short-term memory loss, bouts of anger, over-vigilance concerning her children’s safety and blowing her retirement savings and her children’s education funds with shopping sprees in vain attempts to find comfort.
“I switched up my living room furniture four times,” she said.
But there’s no intensive help for jurors — only what they find and pay for themselves — who, simply by doing their civic duty, find themselves debilitated and victimized by a criminal act.
Tuesday’s Ontario Court of Appeal hearing focuses on the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board’s refusal to aid the woman, arguing she doesn’t meet its definition of a crime victim.
The divisional court upheld that decision.
The woman’s lawyers, London’s Barbara Legate and Dan Macdonald, will make an unprecedented pitch to redefine who’s considered a *victim under the Compensation for Victims of Crime Act.
While there may be some in-house help for others in the justice system, other than some counselling through the police, jurors are often simply thanked for their help and sent on their way with no real response to their trauma.
Gowdey was instrumental in finding help for the juror and has taken on the mental health of jurors as a critical issue for the *justice system.
He learned about the woman’s plight after she and another juror decided to go to Woodstock months after the verdict and do their own “Tori Walk,” along the path the little girl took before her abduction, “to clear our minds.”
They ended up near the Woodstock police station where they met with Chief Bill Renton. The woman said she wanted to congratulate him on the investigation and tell him she wanted to be there when they demolished Rafferty’s car.
After their conversation, Gowdey was contacted and he helped arrange for the woman to get help through the trauma program at London Health Sciences Centre.
He didn’t stop there. While Ontario Attorney General Yasir Naqvi said last month he’s looking to improve support for traumatized jurors, a committee within his own ministry has been quietly tackling the issue for some time.
In January, the province will provide jurors with a hotline they can call to get help whenever they need it, reports said Monday.
Gowdey helped to get it started. He and the juror met with ministry representatives two years ago. The woman told her story and “people were deeply affected by it.”
That led to discussions about trauma experienced by jurors and others working in the courts. But, Gowdey said, post-traumatic stress disorder treatment is so specialized and intensive, it requires the right program to give the best help.
The plan hadn’t reached the structure and funding stage by the time Gowdey retired in September. He said he’s volunteered to continue with the committee because he feels so strongly about the issue.
“There’s much more awareness about people’s mental health issues,” he said. “Yet, we’re still nowhere in terms of helping these poor jurors.”
Psychologist Peter Jaffe, academic director of the Centre for Research & Education on Violence against Women and Children at Althouse College at Western University, agreed that vicarious trauma in the justice system needs to be addressed — not just for jurors, but all participants in the court system.
Jurors, in particular, are vulnerable. Jaffe said it should “become normal protocol across Ontario that we prepare juries beforehand and that we provide services for them after if they are exposed to traumatic material.
“It’s not about every juror suing the province of Ontario — it’s about the province of Ontario having policy and funding in place to ensure we do prevention and early intervention,” he said.
“We shouldn’t have waited to this point.”
Jaffe has done work with American judges, “and it’s across all (U.S.) states that I’ve worked with that judges raise this issue and ensure that jurors are referred for counselling.”
Not every juror will react to evidence the same way, he said. He’s seen various reactions during the many times he’s had to testify in serious cases.
“You can see in their eyes that some are really focused and paying attention and others are really inside their own private space, feeling traumatized by what they are hearing.”
Gowdey pointed out the potential Rafferty jurors were warned in advance by the judge during the selection process that the evidence was going to be difficult to hear.
“That was said to each potential juror, but nobody can prepare you for standing on that hillside on a sunny day thinking about what Rafferty and McClintic did to this poor little girl,” he said.
“Nobody could prepare you for that.”
jsims@postmedia.com
twitter.com/JaneatLFPress
'I felt that I was there'; Tori Stafford juror traumatized by 'not being able to
 
JLM
+1
#96
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

'I felt that I was there'; Tori Stafford juror traumatized by 'not being able to save her'
By Jane Sims , The London Free Press
First posted: Monday, November 07, 2016 08:52 AM EST | Updated: Tuesday, November 08, 2016 02:00 AM EST
jsims@postmedia.com
twitter.com/JaneatLFPress
'I felt that I was there'; Tori Stafford juror traumatized by 'not being able to


There's some real A$$holes in this world, I'm afraid!
 
petros
+1
#97
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

There's some real A$$holes in this world, I'm afraid!

Yup and now there are jurors with PTSD dealing with things that are hard to get past.

The damage just escalates and escalates.
 
JLM
#98
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Yup and now there are jurors with PTSD dealing with things that are hard to get past.

The damage just escalates and escalates.


Do you think possibly the lawyers have a role in that?
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+2
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Do you think possibly the lawyers have a role in that?

If there is evil, you can be sure a lawyer is there.
 
Mowich
#100
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Do you think possibly the lawyers have a role in that?

Uh........that would be a no, JLM. Kind of makes one wonder how jurors ever got through the Bernardo/Holmolka trial or any of the others that involved children.
 
spaminator
+1
#101
Tori Stafford murder trial juror with PTSD receives settlement
By Jane Sims , The London Free Press
First posted: Tuesday, November 08, 2016 09:03 AM EST
The traumatized juror from Michael Rafferty's murder trial is going to get the help she wants.
Late Monday, the 57-year old London woman was advised the province's attorney-general would be paying for some of her therapy, part of his promise this week to give help to jurors in violent cases.
The decision cancelled the woman's scheduled appeal at the Ontario Court of Appeal, scheduled for Monday morning.
She had planned to fight a decision by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board which had denied her financial help, deciding she didn't fit their definition of a victim of crime.
The case she helped decide was the brutal murder of Woodstock schoolgirl Victoria (Tori) Stafford, 9, in 2009.
For almost three months, the jury heard evidence about how the girl was abducted and brutally murdered, with her body left in a rural area near Mount Forest.
The juror's identity is protected by court order.
Following the case, she reached out to the Crown's office, sparking discussions within the ministry three years ago to develop support for jurors.
Only after she and a Toronto juror from another murder trial came forward this month did the government publicly acknowledge the issue.
Dan Macdonald, the juror' London lawyer on the appeal, said in an email that the attorney-general "has agreed to provide her with some financial assistance toward the expenses she has borne in obtaining treatment following the trial."
"She applauds the steps taken by the attorney-general to ensure that future jurors receive assistance when they need it," he said.
jsims@postmedia.com
Twitter.com/JaneatLFPress
Tori Stafford murder trial juror with PTSD receives settlement | Ontario | News
 
spaminator
+2
#102
MANDEL: Easy time for Tori Stafford’s killer a disgrace
Michele Mandel
Published:
September 25, 2018
Updated:
September 25, 2018 10:58 PM EDT
Accused Terri-Lynne McClintic is led in handcuffs from the Oxford courthouse after her first appearance. (Susan Bradnam/Postmedia File)
What an outrage this is.
For luring and killing little Victoria (Tori) Stafford, Terri-Lynne McClintic deserves to live out the rest of her days in the darkest, dankest prison available.
Instead, the 27-year-old child killer is serving her life sentence in the lap of virtual luxury – McClintic has been moved to a minimum security aboriginal healing lodge in Saskatchewan where she enjoys her own kitchenette and living room.
How dare she get any break at all.
Too heartless? Perhaps it’s because I spent too many agonizing weeks in that London courtroom in 2012 listening to the horror that befell eight-year-old Tori at the hands of a psychotic duo united in evil – lovesick McClintic and her beau Michael Rafferty. She was Bonnie to his Clyde; Karla Homolka to his Paul Bernardo.
And like Karla, this killer is now getting a sweetheart deal.
The 18-year-old McClintic was a dumpy junkie with a Grade 8 education who was going nowhere fast in a dead-end place they call Oxy county. She fell hard for a “good man” who just happened to have a child abduction fantasy that he wanted her to turn into reality. So she did.
Victoria “Tori” Stafford, 8, from Woodstock (Supplied photo)
It was April 8, 2009. Tori was an adorable tomboy dubbed the “spunky little princess” by her family. She loved Hannah Montana and the colour purple and that cold spring day she was supposed to go home and watch a movie with her girlfriends.
She’d never make it. As Rafferty waited hungrily in a car 300 metres away, McClintic lured the child from Oliver Stephens Public School in Woodstock with promises of showing her a puppy.
When McClintic delivered her prey, the monster was angry that she wasn’t young enough.
Forced into the Honda Civic, Tori was driven to a remote farmer’s field where Rafferty brutally raped her over and over again as McClintic turned her back.
“T! T! Make him stop,” Tori had begged her. “Make him stop!”
But that coward did nothing to save the helpless little girl.
There were so many times where McClintic was left alone in the car with the kidnapped child and could have told her to run for her life. She never did.
When Rafferty was finally done with Tori, she was kicked, stomped on and struck repeatedly with a hammer until her moaning finally ended.
McClintic tearfully confessed to police a month later. She painted herself as his helpless puppet and that Rafferty had wielded the hammer that killed Tori. When she testified at his murder trial three years later, she suddenly insisted that she was the one who bludgeoned her to death.
Was she trying to help the man she once loved? Or was she even more evil than we had imagined?
Under cross-examination, we learned McClintic had a history of rage and murder fantasies that pre-dated her linking up with Rafferty.
She was no meek and innocent pawn. She had once microwaved a dog and while doing time for robbery and assault about a year before Tori’s slaying, she vowed to spill blood once she was released.
“I just wanna bounce, get out, go on a f–kin’ killin’ spree,” she wrote in a jailhouse letter she signed “Murderouz Bitchez.”
In another letter, she fantasized about snatching the first person she saw, mutilating them and smashing their skull in “That way they stay conscious of the pain I’m inflictin on em.”
Terri-Lynne McClintic and Michael Rafferty. (Police handout)
No, McClintic was hardly some innocent female under the spell of her boyfriend.
The only thing she’s ever done right is pleading guilty in 2010 to first-degree murder. Who could imagine that just eight years later, the woman who delivered Tori to her rapist and killer would be afforded the luxury of a spiritual lodge where she can explore “teachings, ceremonies and workshops with elders” and develop a personal plan to help with her rehabilitation?
It’s beyond enraging. It’s disgusting. What in the world is Corrections Canada thinking?
The sad fact is that life never really means life in this country and McClintic will likely be released by her mid-40s, with decades still to enjoy. And yes, if this child predator is to get out, better that she should be treated and rehabilitated before her release.
But that doesn’t mean we should be sending her to a resort.
mmandel@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...-is-a-disgrace
 
petros
+2
#103
The Rez the Healing Lodge in on is pissed at Corrections Canada. The Elders used to have say in who can come to the facility, now they don't.

This is crazy in any society or culture but I wouldn't put it past the Bizarro Libs to do this kind of shit to gain points.

FNs are a rapidly growing and yound demographic
 
petros
+4
#104  Top Rated Post
The Rez the lodge is on doesn't want her there. The Elders used to have a say. This is appalling behaviour nobody wants reflecting on their culture of society.

Leave it to the Liberals. I wouldn't put this as a "it's societies fault" or "generational residential school disorder" reconciliation move.
 
Mowich
+2
#105
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The Rez the lodge is on doesn't want her there. The Elders used to have a say. This is appalling behaviour nobody wants reflecting on their culture of society.

Leave it to the Liberals. I wouldn't put this as a "it's societies fault" or "generational residential school disorder" reconciliation move.

After the hue and cry from opposition parties in the HOC today, it appears that Goodale is finally calling for a review. With any luck the result will find this piece of human garbage back behind bars where she so justly deserves to be for the rest of her life.

I'm not surprised the healing lodge is upset over this, pete. Who in their right mind would put her in a place where she will have access to children?
 
Ron in Regina
#106
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The Rez the lodge is on doesn't want her there. The Elders used to have a say. This is appalling behaviour nobody wants reflecting on their culture of society.

Leave it to the Liberals. I wouldn't put this as a "it's societies fault" or "generational residential school disorder" reconciliation move.


Which Rez? Just curious.....
 
petros
+1
#107
The women federal lidge is out by Maple Creek out in the middle of the desert.
 
Ron in Regina
+1
#108
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The women federal lidge is out by Maple Creek out in the middle of the desert.


I've been on 60-some Reserves in SK but
that's one of the few that's not a Fly-In that
I haven't been on.
 
JLM
#109
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

MANDEL: Easy time for Tori Stafford’s killer a disgrace
Michele Mandel
Published:
September 25, 2018
Updated:
September 25, 2018 10:58 PM EDT
Accused Terri-Lynne McClintic is led in handcuffs from the Oxford courthouse after her first appearance. (Susan Bradnam/Postmedia File)
What an outrage this is.
For luring and killing little Victoria (Tori) Stafford, Terri-Lynne McClintic deserves to live out the rest of her days in the darkest, dankest prison available.


Regardless of what anyone else thinks, there should be a provision for capital punishment for certain cases, like multiple murders where there is absolutely no chance of innocence. Ones that come to mind are Clifford Olson, Robert Pickton, Karla Homolka, Paul Bernardo, The two bastards that snuffed out little Tori and Dellen Milland, a triple murderer including his own father. What is the point in keeping these bastards alive at huge public expense to the taxpayer? Some argue that death is too kind for these bastards. Well, that could be modified a little - there's no reason why the death process has to be limited to a few seconds...………..I'm sure it could be made quite uncomfortable over a period of say a month. These bastards are enjoying a far more luxurious life than many of our own people like the ones on Northern reserves in run down shacks and no potable drinking water. That Russell Williams ex army, is another case. The total cost of keeping these bastards must be in excess of a $million a year.
 
petros
#110
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

I've been on 60-some Reserves in SK but
that's one of the few that's not a Fly-In that
I haven't been on.

A gal I know did 3 years there on manslaughter.

It's no picnic, it's honour system a hierarchy and no where to run if you tried. Obey the house rules or get beat by your roommates who know they could be in the Pen instead of the group houses. If one f-cks up, they all face consequences.
 
spaminator
+1
#111
MANDEL: Tori Stafford's dad welcomes outrage over transfer of girl's killer
Michele Mandel
Published:
September 26, 2018
Updated:
September 26, 2018 6:26 PM EDT
Rodney Stafford, the father of murdered eight-year-old Victoria 'Tori' Stafford enters Osgoode Hall in Toronto on Monday, October 24, 2016. (Tyler Anderson/Postmedia Network)
No one has offered him spiritual healing.
Instead, the father of slain Victoria Stafford must live every day knowing the horrific details of his daughter’s abduction, rape and murder nine years ago.
So learning that one of the eight-year-old’s killers was transferred nine months ago to an Aboriginal healing lodge was beyond outrageous.
“I was floored,” says Tori’s father, Rodney Stafford, 43.
And then he was furious.
“Anybody who’s willing to take a child’s life deserves to serve their whole sentence in maximum security, not hang out with family. She’s living it up better than a third of Canadians right now.”
Terri-Lynne McClintic, 27, pleaded guilty to first-degree murder in 2010 and was serving her life sentence at the Grand Valley Institution for Women in Kitchener.
In December, she was quietly moved to Okimaw Ohci Healing Lodge in Saskatchewan where she has a bedroom, living room, kitchenette and access to teachings, ceremonies and workshops with elders.
Victoria “Tori” Stafford, 8, from Woodstock (Supplied photo)
She has also applied for temporary absence passes to attend drug and alcohol counselling, but then withdrew her request.
Because Correctional Service of Canada didn’t have his new address, Stafford only learned of her transfer recently.
“What were they thinking? Why was it approved?” he demands from his Woodstock home.
“It’s just not right. There’s got to be somebody in there to send her back to where she belongs.”
Since the story broke in the London Free Press, the swell of national outrage has left Stafford hopeful the ridiculous transfer may be reversed.
Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale has asked correction officials to undertake a complete review.
During a stormy Question Period session, Opposition MPs pressed for more.
“Canadians aren’t looking for a review, they’re looking for action,” Conservative leader Andrew Scheer told the prime minister.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford called and also vowed to do what he can to help.
“It’s making me feel proud of Victoria,” her father says.
“She’s making changes.”
On April 8, 2009, Tori was going to walk home alone from school for the first time.
McClintic was waiting instead.
She lured the little girl to a waiting Honda Civic with promises of showing her a dog. Inside was McClintic’s boyfriend, Michael Rafferty, who had asked her to help him live out his child rape fantasy.
McClintic, 18 at the time, knew the child would not be allowed to live. She ignored Tori’s screams and pleas for help and even bought the garbage bags and hammer used to beat her to death and dispose of her body.
Does this sound like someone who deserves a spa-setting to do her life sentence?
“She’s a heinous killer who did nothing to stop what happened,” Stafford insists.
“She had multiple opportunities to let her go. She deserves to be serving her entire sentence in maximum security, not having luxuries a lot of us don’t have ourselves.”
Terri-Lynne McClintic is taken out of Woodstock court in handcuffs on May 20, 2009. (Postmedia file)
Perhaps, surprising for a grieving father robbed of his daughter, he’s not asking that McClintic be imprisoned forever. If after 25 years she can demonstrate that she’s no longer the monster she was, he wouldn’t protest her release.
“Do the time,” Stafford says. “Prove to everybody that taking my child changed your life to the point that you want to do something to better it. If she did her time in the prison and made the changes, maybe she could have a life and a family.”
But after just nine years behind bars — including a violent attack on a fellow inmate in 2012 — McClintic is far from that point yet.
With an outpouring of support, Stafford is planning a rally on Parliament Hill for Nov. 2 and a petition is in the works. He’s determined to make the world a safer place for all children, including his son who is now Tori’s age when she was raped and killed.
“It’s been quite an emotional ride. There are certain traits in him that remind me of Victoria,” he says.
She would be 18 now. Maybe off to college. Perhaps working at her first job. Instead, her father is left only with memories.
“I have no choice but to think of her every day. A song, an image, things constantly take you back. I channel that into making changes for the better,” her father explains. “She was my little girl and I want justice for her.”
mmandel@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...f-girls-killer
 
Liberalman
-1
#112
It was the federal Conservative party in 2014 that put herin a medium security prison and she was transfered to a medium security prison in Manitoba that is a aborigonal healing lodge. We have to remember that her husband was the one who killed the Stafford girl and he is in a maximum security prison. When you are at the voting booth next year you will have to make the decision to vote for the federal Conservative who really don't believe in the rule of law and the Charter of Rights and freedoms unless you are of white privelidge
 
pgs
+1
#113
Quote: Originally Posted by Liberalman View Post

It was the federal Conservative party in 2014 that put herin a medium security prison and she was transfered to a medium security prison in Manitoba that is a aborigonal healing lodge. We have to remember that her husband was the one who killed the Stafford girl and he is in a maximum security prison. When you are at the voting booth next year you will have to make the decision to vote for the federal Conservative who really don't believe in the rule of law and the Charter of Rights and freedoms unless you are of white privelidge

Is there any responsibility in that Charter of Rights and Freedom ?
 
petros
+2
#114
Terri-Lynne McClintic received a life sentence in prison for her role in the brutal rape, and murder of a poor young girl, Tori Stafford.

She's a convicted child murderer and rapist and she's even admitted to putting a dog in a microwave.

But thanks to the Trudeau Liberals McClintic has been released from her maximum security prison early and is being sent to an aboriginal healing lodge in Saskatchewan instead.

That's despicable.



Thankfully, it turns out that even the aboriginal leaders in the community are repulsed by her even being on their land.

Obviously, this cannot stand.

Canada's Minister of Public Safety, Ralph Goodale has stood silent, calling her actions “past bad practices.”

Are you kidding me?

I'm fed up with Goodale’s two-tiered justice system. A child murder is a child murder.

It might please you to know that the people of Saskatchewan, where the healing lodge that McClintic is being transferred to is located, has a 75% support rate for the death penalty. I hope she feels welcome there.

If you are as disgusted as I am, stand with me, sign my petition at:

www.LifeMeansLife.ca.

This failure is on Goodale’s shoulders. It is a betrayal of every mother and father, in the past and in the future of children who have and will be innocent victims of monsters like this.

Remember Grant, never stop fighting for what’s right.

Keean Bexte
Rebel Reporter
Calgary, Alberta
 
Mowich
#115
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Terri-Lynne McClintic received a life sentence in prison for her role in the brutal rape, and murder of a poor young girl, Tori Stafford.

She's a convicted child murderer and rapist and she's even admitted to putting a dog in a microwave.

But thanks to the Trudeau Liberals McClintic has been released from her maximum security prison early and is being sent to an aboriginal healing lodge in Saskatchewan instead.

That's despicable.



Thankfully, it turns out that even the aboriginal leaders in the community are repulsed by her even being on their land.

Obviously, this cannot stand.

Canada's Minister of Public Safety, Ralph Goodale has stood silent, calling her actions “past bad practices.”

Are you kidding me?

I'm fed up with Goodale’s two-tiered justice system. A child murder is a child murder.

It might please you to know that the people of Saskatchewan, where the healing lodge that McClintic is being transferred to is located, has a 75% support rate for the death penalty. I hope she feels welcome there.

If you are as disgusted as I am, stand with me, sign my petition at:

www.LifeMeansLife.ca.

This failure is on Goodale’s shoulders. It is a betrayal of every mother and father, in the past and in the future of children who have and will be innocent victims of monsters like this.

Remember Grant, never stop fighting for what’s right.

Keean Bexte
Rebel Reporter
Calgary, Alberta


She didn't just 'put a dog in a microwave', pete. She nuked it.
 
spaminator
#116
Chief investigator into Tori Stafford murder denounces killer's transfer
Heather Rivers
Published:
October 2, 2018
Updated:
October 2, 2018 7:57 AM EDT
Woodstock police Chief Bill Renton, who led the probe into Tori Stafford's disappearance and death; Terri-Lynne McClintic, who was convicted in the child's murder.
The lead investigator into the slaying of Woodstock school girl Victoria (Tori) Stafford is denouncing the surprise transfer of one of her killers from an Ontario maximum security prison to an Indigenous healing lodge in Saskatchewan eight years into her life sentence.
Terri-Lynne McClintic’s move to such a “privileged program” is “unacceptable,” Woodstock police Chief Bill Renton, who oversaw the massive OPP manhunt for Stafford’s two killers before joining the Woodstock force, told The London Free Press on Monday as he released a critical statement about the transfer.
“I echo the concerns of the nation,” he said in the statement. “I believe the correctional system needs to be predicated on rehabilitation for those who have committed crimes and proven themselves worthy.”
Rare for police chiefs to speak so candidly about the justice system after a case has been closed, Renton’s comments come a week after The Free Press broke the story of McClintic’s quiet transfer to the healing lodge, where inmates live in single and family residential units and may even have their children stay with them.
Stafford’s enraged father, Rodney Stafford, blasted the transfer but the fallout last week went even higher, with federal Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale ordering the nation’s prison commissioner to review the move.
In the House of Commons the Opposition Conservatives demanded answers, as did the ruling Progressive Conservatives in the Ontario legislature.
Eight-year-old Tori was raped, beaten and murdered on April 8, 2009 after being abducted in Woodstock while walking home from school. She’d been lured by McClintic with the promise of seeing a puppy, into the car of her boyfriend Michael Rafferty. Her body, abandoned in garbage bags, was found three months after she went missing in a rural area near Mount Forest.
On May 20, 2009 police charged Michael Rafferty and McClintic with first-degree murder.
McClintic pleaded guilty in 2010 and was sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 25 years.
Rafferty was convicted of first-degree murder by a jury following a 2011 trial where McClintic testified.
Renton expressed community offence at McClintic’s transfer.
“I feel compelled to speak for our community and for our officers. Hopefully, we show the family we care. Everybody should care,” said Renton, who was the OPP case manager for the three-year joint investigation with Woodstock police.
“Watching these events, I had hoped that the situation would have been properly rectified. We do take exception to it.”
Renton worked with more than 900 OPP officers who contributed to the search for Stafford’s killers in 2009, at the time the largest-ever provincial police dragnet, before going on to become Woodstock’s chief.
On his Facebook page, Rodney Stafford has begged Prime Minister Justin Trudeau “to do the right thing” and reverse the transfer of his daughter’s killer. Stafford vows to hold a rally on Parliament Hill to protest McClintic’s move to the Saskatchewan healing lodge.
Renton said recent events have rekindled many difficult memories from the Stafford tragedy. He called her “a beautiful, young innocent girl” who was taken unjustly and in a “heinous manner.” He described the pain caused to her family and all who knew her as “profound.”
He also said the “horrific” act of violence touched the lives of all the officers involved, as well Crown attorneys, professional agencies, the judiciary, court staff and the jurors.
“We lived this for three years. Officers are very invested in this,” he said. “If you look at the nature of the crime, how can you not be affected?”
“I want to show support to the community, the coppers and the family.”
HRivers@postmedia.com
Twitter.com/HeatheratLFP
Statement from Woodstock police Chief Bill Renton
Recent events have re-kindled many difficult memories from the Tori Stafford tragedy. As the Chief of the Woodstock Police Service, and the Major Case Manager of the investigation, I feel compelled to speak for our community and for our officers. Watching these events I had hoped that the situation would have been properly rectified. I have the greatest respect for the men and women of the Correctional Services.
The human turmoil and pain caused by the actions of McClintic and Rafferty is unprecedented. A beautiful young, innocent girl was taken so unjustly. The pain of her parents, brother, grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, friends, classmates, teachers, volunteers, the local community, the province and the nation is profound. This horrific murder also touched the lives of the over 900 police offers who were involved in the case in some capacity as well as the crown attorneys, professional agencies, the judiciary, court staff and the jurors. The effects of this crime were immense as they strove to ensure that the interests of justice were served.
As law enforcement professionals, our primary obligation is to the law and to discharge our duties in a manner which supports the criminal justice system. However, we are also the friends and neighbours of the residents of our community. Tori became our community’s daughter. The nature and extent of the crime against her touched everyone involved. We share in the hopes, fears and frustrations of our fellow residents at times like this.
As police officers we constantly strive to support the victims of crime and their families. This support does not end at the conclusion of the trial. I believe that I speak for all of our members when I state that the memory of young Tori and her family have our unconditional love and support.” We question McClintic’s move to the healing centre at such an early stage of her just and proper guilty verdict of first degree murder and sentence of Life Imprisonment with no parole eligibility for 25 years. We also realize the family lives that life sentence every day that beautiful young Tori does not return home. They can hold dear the memories of their beautiful daughter, but they also hold in their hearts and minds the reminder of the heinous manner that Tori spent her last moments on this earth which haunt them continually. Such a reminder that haunts far too many, far too often.
I am a true advocate of our Charter, the Criminal Justice System and Correctional Services. I believe our Correctional System needs to be predicated on rehabilitation for those that have committed crimes and proven themselves worthy, however, I echo the concerns of a nation, that 6 years into a 25 year parole eligibility is unacceptable entrance into such a privileged program.
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...llers-transfer
 
Mowich
+1
#117
Here is just a partial list of the brutal murderers that Canada has set free

The Canadian justice system has freed serial killers, child murderers, mass shooters, cop killers, cannibals and even terrorists — all against the desperate pleas of victim's families.

Canadian public opinion has been galvanized this week by the news that Terri-Lynne McClintic, one of the murderers of eight-year-old Tori Stafford, has been transferred to a low-security “healing lodge” after only eight years in federal prison.

Canadians would be right to suspect that this is something that happens relatively often. A Canadian given a “life sentence” for first-degree murder can expect to get out of jail in only 22.4 years, according to 2002 numbers from Corrections Service Canada. The Canadian justice system has freed serial killers, child murderers, mass shooters, cop killers, cannibals and even terrorists. Just as in the case of the transfer of McClintic, these releases have almost always occurred despite the fervent appeals of victims’ families. Below, a not-at-all comprehensive list of notorious Canadian killers who were released early, got parole or escaped from minimum security or prison leaves.

Craig Munro
Munro was robbing a Toronto restaurant in 1980 when he shot Const. Michael Sweet, an officer attempting to intervene. Over a 90-minute standoff, Munro held off any attempt to secure medical care for the seriously wounded officer. As Sweet bled to death and pleaded for his life, Munro mocked him, saying he would never see his three daughters again. The episode would cause another officer at the scene, Sgt. Eddie Adamson, to take his own life in 2005. In 2010, despite being deemed a “moderate” risk to reoffend, Munro was granted unescorted passes from a B.C. minimum security prison. Those were revoked in 2012 when he tested positive for cocaine and was found to be consorting with prostitutes, although he is able to re-apply for parole every two years.

Shawn Merrick
Career criminal Merrick shot and killed Coquitlam’s Shelley Devoe, 44, in 2006 because he suspected her of stealing $800. Sent to jail for the murder in 2009, he was soon transferred to a minimum security institution from which he easily escaped in 2015. He robbed six banks in the Lower Mainland before being caught six weeks later.

Patrick Kelly
A former RCMP drug squad officer, Kelly murdered his wife Jeanette in 1984 by throwing her off the balcony of their 17th-floor Toronto apartment. Kelly has never admitted to the murder, claiming that his wife simply tripped and fell. Nevertheless, he has repeatedly been granted day and full parole since 2004. Every time, Kelly has quickly violated parole terms by pursuing multiple romantic relationships with women unaware of his criminal past.

Andy Bruce
Bruce was given a life sentence in 1970 for shooting dead a young woman in front of her seven-year-old daughter, reportedly over an ounce of heroin. Even before that Bruce had a lengthy rap sheet that included two sex attacks on strangers. In 1975, Bruce was one of the ringleaders of a hostage-taking and escape attempt at New Westminster’s B.C. Penitentiary that killed 32-year-old social worker Mary Steinhauser, reportedly as she was being used by Bruce as a human shield. Despite all of this, Bruce was granted full parole in 2010. He was arrested in 2016 after he was found masturbating at a bus stop and threatening passersby with a can of pepper spray.

Denis Lortie
Long before there was the 2014 Parliament Hill attacks, there was Denis Lortie. Using weapons stolen from a Canadian Armed Forces base, Lortie charged shooting into the Quebec National Assembly in 1984, wounding 13 and killing three government employees: George Boyer, Camille Lepage and Roger Lefrançois. The death toll could have easily been much higher if the attack had started while the assembly was in session. Lortie pleaded guilty to three counts of second-degree murder in 1987, but got day parole in 1995 and full parole in 1996, only 12 years after the murders.

Canada’s youngest mass murderer
Known only by her initials in court documents, J.R. was only 12 years old when she had her 23-year-old boyfriend Jeremy Steinke break into her Medicine Hat home to murder her parents. Her eight-year-old brother was also killed to prevent him becoming a witness. J.R. was completely freed after 8.5 years in prison, with one judge saying that her murdered parents “would be rather proud” of her rehabilitation.

Michael Yarema
On the night of Boxing Day 1988, Yarema, then 22, was among a group of men who pulled 21-year-old Terry Spindler out of a Kingston bar, bundled him off to a house, and proceeded to beat and torture him to death — ending the night by urinating on Spindler’s body. The men believed that Spindler had been the perpetrator of a violent robbery against a local drug dealer’s mother. In fact, the robbery had been committed by Spindler’s twin brother. Convicted of first degree murder, Yarema was out of prison before his 40th birthday, with the parole board saying he had shown “remarkable change” in his personality. The parents of Spindler did not attend Yarema’s parole board hearings, telling local media through a friend that they didn’t wish to participate in a process that they saw as being slanted against the victim.

Jeremy Molitor
A star in the Canadian amateur boxing community, Molitor won gold for Canada in the welterweight division of the 1998 Commonwealth Games. In 2002, he stabbed his 21-year-old girlfriend Jessica Nethery 58 times before abandoning her body in a parked car. Convicted of second degree murder, he was out on day parole by 2015 and has a new girlfriend. “He can murder someone brutally and less than 14 years later be told he can try living his life back in civilization. It’s really angering and frustrating,” the victim’s sister, Stephanie Nethery, told the Sarnia Observer in 2015.

Derik Lord
In 1990, a 17-year-old Lord joined a plot by schoolmate Darren Huenemann to collect part of a $4 million inheritance by brutally murdering two of Huenemann’s relatives. Using kitchen knives and crowbars, Lord participated in the murder of Doris Leatherbarrow, 69, and Sharon Huenemann, 47 in their Tsawwassen home. Despite never admitting guilt and being denied day parole, Lord was still granted escorted absences earlier this year in order to visit family in Chilliwack. “We don’t feel we’re being protected when a convicted double murderer who can’t admit their guilt is walking around,” Kim Hill, a relative of the two slain, told Postmedia in June. Another of the killers, David Muir, has been on full parole since 2003.

Vince Li
Although he now calls himself Will Baker, Li was in the depths of untreated schizophrenia in 2008 when on a Greyhound bus in Manitoba he stabbed seatmate Tim McLean to death and began mutilating and eating the corpse. One of the first RCMP officers on the scene would later take his own life in part because of the trauma. Baker was found not criminally responsible for the murder, and in 2017 was granted an absolute discharge from psychiatric care, effectively removing any ability for the justice system to monitor his movements and actions. Carol de Delley, McLean’s mother, vigorously opposed the release, saying there was no way to ensure that Baker wouldn’t forsake his medication and kill again. “I don’t believe for one second that Will Baker poses no threat,” she said in a statement.

Karla Homolka
Homolka is easily the most notorious Canadian murderer who has walked free. Along with then-husband Paul Bernardo, she participated in the 1991 abduction, rape and murder of two Ontario schoolgirls, Kristen French and Leslie Mahaffy. Homolka received a lesser sentence of manslaughter as a result of a deal she struck with prosecutors and was out of prison by 2005. In 2012 she was found to be living a new life as a mother of three in the Caribbean and in 2017 she was found to be volunteering at a Montreal elementary school.

Bill Nichols
At the tail end of a string of violent crimes in 1976, Bill Nichols murdered Calgary Police officer Keith Harrison, a father of two teenaged boys. Nichols was initially set to face the death penalty, but following federal abolition of capital punishment he instead became the first Canadian to be convicted of first-degree murder and was handed a sentence without parole eligibility for 25 years. Nevertheless, under the faint hope clause he was given day parole by 1993 and was on full parole by 1996. “Our justice system provides unbelievable support and assistance to the offenders, and couldn’t give a rat’s ass about the victims,” one of Harrison’s friends wrote in a 2001 letter to Postmedia.

Steven Kummerfield
In 1995, the 20-year-old Kummerfield and a friend got extremely drunk, cruised the streets of Regina looking for a prostitute, and then took her to a remote area where they beat her to death. According to a later autopsy, Pamela Jean George, 28 and a mother of two, was still clinging to life when they left her face-down in a field near the Regina airport. “We drove around, got drunk and killed this chick,” Kummerfield, a university basketball star and the grandson of a Saskatchewan cabinet minister, would tell a friend the next day according to court testimony. Convicted of manslaughter, Kummerfield was granted full parole only five years after the crime. A parole board decision wrote that Kummerfield showed little remorse for his crime, but that regardless, he wasn’t “an undue risk on full parole.”

Harold Smeltzer
Calgary girl Kimberley Thompson was snatched off the street by Smeltzer in 1980 while she was on her way to kindergarten. He drowned her in a bathtub and stuffed her body in a garbage can. Only five years old at the time, Kimberley would now be 44 had she lived. In addition to the murder Smeltzer also admitted to 40 other sexual assaults against children. The Parole Board of Canada began granting unescorted passed to Smeltzer in 2008. Despite numerous parole violations, such as possessing pornography or admitting to being attracted to a young girl while on day parole in Regina, those leaves have continued. “It makes me sick actually … sick to my stomach because I’m so afraid that it’s going to happen again to somebody else and nobody – nobody – should have to go through what our family has gone through,” Kim’s mother Evelyn Thompson told Global News in 2017.

Steven LeClair
Thrown out of a Vancouver bar in 1980, LeClair returned with a gun and opened fire on random patrons, killing three. Then, he drove to the Richmond RCMP detachment and murdered the first Mountie he saw, Const. Tom Agar. It was one of the most shocking spasms of violence in Vancouver history, but LeClair already had a lengthy history of violence against family, police and romantic partners. “Someone who is capable of that level of controlled rage will always have a question mark about the possibility of its re-occurrence,” wrote the Parole Board of Canada in 2014. Despite this, he was given unescorted leaves from prison starting that year. Only in 2017 were those passes revoked after a series of troubling incidents, such as being heard making “disparaging comments towards his victims.”

John Martin Crawford
Just before Christmas 1981, a 19-year-old Crawford beat Mary Jane Serloin to death on the streets of Lethbridge, Alta. A subsequent autopsy found bite marks all over Serloin’s body that were consistent with Crawford’s dental profile. Crawford was convicted of manslaughter and was out of prison within 10 years. Soon after his release he began killing again, and in 1995 Crawford was charged in the murders of three missing Indigenous women; Shelley Napope, 16, Eva Taysup, 30, and Calinda Waterhen, 22. The skeletons of all three were found in shallow graves at a Saskatoon-area golf course.

George Lovie
In 1991, Lovie allegedly sexually assaulted a former girlfriend at knifepoint, telling her that if she went to police about the crime, he would kill her family. She did, and six weeks later he responded by brutally murdering her parents, Arnold and Donna Edwards, in front of her. Former Buffalo Sabres goalie Don Edwards is the son of Arnold and Donna and was a target of similar threats from Lovie. The murders made Edwards a public advocate for stricter homicide sentencing, although his efforts met with little success. In 2017, Lovie began receiving unescorted absences into downtown Sudbury. “To think this guy is going to be walking the streets of Sudbury and people don’t know who he is or what he’s all about … I’ll be honest, I’m completely pissed off, it’s one of the reasons I left Canada,” Edwards, who now lives in an undisclosed part of the U.S. for security reasons, told Postmedia in 2017.

Wayne Boden
Boden became known as the “vampire rapist” for leaving bite marks all over the breasts of his victims. Between 1968 and 1971 he raped and murdered four young women in Montreal: Norma Vaillancourt, Shirley Audette, Marielle Archambault and Jean Way. A fifth, 33-year-old Elizabeth Pourteous, was found murdered and bitten in Calgary. Boden received an indefinite sentence for the murders but in 1984 he escaped while on an escorted “humanitarian” day pass, and would later be found stalking the same area of Montreal where he had met most of his victims.

Gerald Thomas Archer
Archer would become known as the London Chambermaid Slayer for murdering women who worked as chambermaids in London, Ont. He is believed to have sexually assaulted, beaten and stabbed three women in their 50s and 60s: Edith Authier, Jane Wooley and Belva Russell. But he would only be convicted for the 1971 murder of Russell and would be paroled only 14 years later in 1985. “He spent the next 10 years as a nomad, drifting from town to town throughout Ontario and staying in many of the low rent dives where he used to go trolling for his victims,” wrote author Michael Arntfield in the book Murder City, an account of London’s history of serial killers.

Penny Boudreau
In 2008 Boudreau drove her 12-year-old daughter Karissa to an isolated area outside Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, ordered her to leave the car and then strangled her to death with a piece of twine. “Mommy, don’t,” were Karissa’s last words, according to later testimony. Boudreau then falsely claimed that Karissa had been abducted and put out a tearful public plea for her return. Although convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to 20 years in prison, in June the Parole Board of Canada began granting Boudreau escorted leaves from prison to attend church.

https://leaderpost.com/news/canada/h...5-41fd924a529b


Myself, I would have used Corrections Canada in the headline as they are the ones responsible for allowing these criminals back into society.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#118
Long ladder, short rope does it for me.
 
Mowich
#119
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Long ladder, short rope does it for me.

I doubt we will ever see capital punishment brought back here in Canada, Tec. Not one of the mainstream political parties would dare bring it forward as poll after poll has shown that Canadians do not support the policy. I personally do not support capital punishment which is not to say that I haven't felt that many of the depraved sickos who've made their way through the criminal justice system didn't richly deserve to have their lives taken from them.
 
JLM
#120
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

I doubt we will ever see capital punishment brought back here in Canada, Tec. Not one of the mainstream political parties would dare bring it forward as poll after poll has shown that Canadians do not support the policy. I personally do not support capital punishment which is not to say that I haven't felt that many of the depraved sickos who've made their way through the criminal justice system didn't richly deserve to have their lives taken from them.


I'm normally against it, but as in most things in life there are exceptions, some of those being multiple murders where there is D.N.A. and for some murders of children.
 

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