San Francisco bans traditional plastic grocery bags


CBC News
#1
San Francisco has become the first city in North America to ban the use of traditional plastic grocery bags, a step that municipal leaders hope will spread across the country.

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TenPenny
#2
Passed Tuesday by the city's board of supervisors, the law prohibits large grocery stores and drugstores from using non-recyclable and non-biodegradable plastic bags made from petroleum products.

Which means that it is utterly meaningless. All of the plastic bags we use here (called T shirt bags) are recycleable, and, in fact, most are MADE from recycled plastic. Unless they're 20 years behind the Maritimes, that's a completely stupid, pointless, and worthless bylaw.

Or, possibly, the person who wrote the article is just clueless, and doesn't know that plastic bags can be recycled.
 
sanctus
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by CBC News View Post

San Francisco has become the first city in North America to ban the use of traditional plastic grocery bags, a step that municipal leaders hope will spread across the country.

More...

I must really be as old as my children think! Why? The use of "traditional plastic grocery bags" in the title of this report. "Traditional?" Oh my! To me, traditional would be the brown paper bags. I remember when grocery stores began using "traditional" plastic bags to replace the brown paper bags.I must have been in my mid to late teens at the time..Yes, I must be old
 
s243a
#4
I presume they are talking about using reusable cloth begs. Hopefully people wash them. As far as plastic begs go I reuse my plastic grocery begs as garbage begs.
 
TenPenny
#5
I use some for garbage, but most get stuffed in the recycle bin.
 
thomaska
#6
The Homeless in San Fran will be leading a revolution now.
 
tracy
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny View Post

Passed Tuesday by the city's board of supervisors, the law prohibits large grocery stores and drugstores from using non-recyclable and non-biodegradable plastic bags made from petroleum products.

Which means that it is utterly meaningless. All of the plastic bags we use here (called T shirt bags) are recycleable, and, in fact, most are MADE from recycled plastic. Unless they're 20 years behind the Maritimes, that's a completely stupid, pointless, and worthless bylaw.

Or, possibly, the person who wrote the article is just clueless, and doesn't know that plastic bags can be recycled.

Apparently less than 1% of plastic bags are actually put in for recycling. Most of them are just thrown in the trash.
 
#juan
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by tracy View Post

Apparently less than 1% of plastic bags are actually put in for recycling. Most of them are just thrown in the trash.

So the problem is not with the bags. It is with the people who don't recycle.
 
tracy
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

So the problem is not with the bags. It is with the people who don't recycle.

Sure, but which do you think is easier to change?
 
hermanntrude
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by tracy View Post

Apparently less than 1% of plastic bags are actually put in for recycling. Most of them are just thrown in the trash.

yes that's true, but it still means that the new law means absolutely nothing. It basically means that nothing needs to change. All bags currently in use (or very nearly all) are allowable by that law, so the bags will continue to be used and continue to not be recycled.
 
hermanntrude
#11
it's not that hard to make a biodegradeable plastic bag. I suspect though that it'd cost a fraction more and so will never ever ever happen.

wherever there's a problem, look where the money is.
 
TenPenny
#12
We use plastic bags for our compost - they're compostable bags. Essentially, the plastic is mixed with corn starch and other biodegradeables. Nice idea. But you can't buy the bags too far ahead of time. They don't last, for some reason. Ha.
 
eh1eh
#13
Just heard a spot on CBC radio about bags made from maple sap. I guess it is the same premis as the bio-bags used for the green bin composting but the energy used to make them from maple sap is much less than using corn as a base material. According to CBC it is just a matter of scaling up production as the science is in place.
If I can find a link I will post.
 
Walter
#14
Bet they wish they still had those bags.
The Feces-Strewn Streets of San Francisco
 
Hoid
+1
#15  Top Rated Post
I specifically remember the first time I ever saw a plastic grocery bag. It was 1972 and I saw it blowing down the road and I remember thinking at the time that it was such a stupid idea that it would be banned almost right away. 40 plus years later and they are just starting to phase them out .
 
Murphy
#16
You were not born in 1972. Your parents might have been alive then.
 
Curious Cdn
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Murphy View Post

You were not born in 1972. Your parents might have been alive then.

Paper bags aren't perfect but they're not all that bad either if made from a sufficiently heavy grade of paper. Our pulp and paper industry needs the work, now that newspapers have become obsolete, paper bags are recyclable and biodegradable.

Win, win, win...

A re-engineering of paper bags might be in order but we DO have the technology.
 
Hoid
#18
Those plastic bags are specifically excluded from recycling here. You have to throw them in the land fill.
 
Murphy
#19
Correct use of punctuation, Flossy. If you continue to improve, you will make more friends.

Try not to 'short form' words, like they do on Twitter.

Yay, friends!
 
Murphy
#20
---
I think the original plastic ones were not biodegradable. I will see if I can find something to that effect.

Edit: The only thing I could find was that they can be placed in the recycle bins of most regions.
Last edited by Murphy; Feb 21st, 2018 at 10:49 PM..
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Those plastic bags are specifically excluded from recycling here. You have to throw them in the land fill.

Sounds like you live in a sh-itty place. Need to fix your recycling program.
 
OpposingDigit
#22
I think that this recycling trip is almost a complete fraud.

90 percent of garbage (no matter what bin you separate it into) goes to the same landfill. The city recycling plants are miniscule compared to the amount of refuse being generated. They are there for show and tell only. The costs of employing all the workers required to actually sift through the garbage is too prohibitive.

Recycling is great for private companies because they check for any excuse to issue a ticket and huge fines for improper disposal. They low-bid to get the contract and then subsidize with tickets and fines.

The same thing can be said about all the anti-smoking laws.

I believe that the rise of lung cancer was a direct result of Nuclear Testing during the 1940's and 1950's and not so much because of smoking. I am not suggesting that smoking does not contribute to cancer, but rather it was an excuse used to immunize the American government from lawsuits pertaining to their nuclear weapons program.

In the 1950's, the Eastman Kodak Company had threatened a federal lawsuit over the nuclear fallout resulting from a total of 235 above-ground bomb tests that was fogging Kodak's bulk film shipments.

Film was not packed in bubble wrap then, but in corn stalks that were being contaminated by nuclear fallout. (Just think of the Health effects that this had on the parents and offspring.)

As a result of the threatened lawsuit, the U.S. government chose to warn the photographic film industry about the radioactive fallout patterns in advance, but not the general public.

Cancer rates increased because of milk consumption and especially with infants.

In addition; there are huge benefits from disallowing smoking in office towers. There is a huge decrease in maintenance costs because of fewer air filters needed to be changed and fewer paint applications being applied within the structures. And most importantly, fewer air exchanges required meant less oil/gas needed for heating structures and buildings.
Last edited by OpposingDigit; Feb 22nd, 2018 at 03:06 AM..
 
Blackleaf
#23
All shopping bags here in Britain are plastic. Shopping bags made of anything else just seems weird. It always makes me laugh when I see those flimsy paper ones characters carry in American films, which must easily burst.

 

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