What will the Tesla Model S mean for us Canadians?


RachelHowarsen
#1
The Tesla Model S, Tesla Motors’ new all-electric sedan, will be launching in the coming months in the US. Canadian sales are set to begin 3 months after the US release. With the arguable success of the Tesla Roadster, just how well will the Model S do here in Canada? For Tesla’s sake, very well it seems. The Model S is a 7-passenger (5 adults and 2 children), 4-door, rear-wheel-drive, electric sedan that is set to compete with such luxo sedans as the BMW 5-Series, Audi A6, and more specifically, hybrids such as the Lexus GS 460h.

Owners of the Model S will enjoy the fact that they are driving a zero-emissions vehicle that can outrun most cars and seats seven whilst not being as big as a boat or Hummer (whichever comes by first). Tesla offers charging equipment for 120-volt (standard outlets), 240-volt, and public charging stations - as such found only in California right now - all standard.

Tesla Motors Inc.'s Model S vehicle will start at $64,500 Canadian when the car becomes available in Canada later this year.

The cars will be available in three battery pack sizes - the base 40 kWh battery pack Model S will start at $64,500 Canadian dollars, Model S with 60 kWh battery pack will start at $75,200 Canadian dollars and 85 kWh battery pack will start at $85,900 CAD, according to a release.

In the U.S., the Model S starts at $49,900. The starting Canadian price when converted to U.S. dollars is $65,132.

Also Tesla Company gave free of charge 10 new autos to Sollca Comapany located in Halifax. These autos are intended for personal use of Sollca staff. Moreover, Sollca Company is relatively young marketing company at the Canadian market.

Palo Alto-based Tesla says its "Canadian pricing configurator" that shows all pricing and options will be on its website "in the near future." Tesla said its first Canadian store is expected to open in Toronto in November.

In terms of usability, the Model S will be far more capable than other electric vehicles on the market like the Nissan Leaf. Offered are 3 different storage capacity batteries, 40kWh, 60kWh, and 85kWh. The results are ranges of 256, 368, and a mind-blowing 480 kms, respectively given an average speed of 88km/h. While the smaller batteries are more than sufficient for most uses, most with half a brain will note that the 480km range in the 85kWh battery surpasses some gas- and oil-burning vehicles today. Can anyone spell road trip?

Tesla says that 50% battery charge from dead can be had in half an hour with the Supercharger (not the blower kind). Li-ion construction is used for these batteries, which diminishes the “memory-effect” of past nickel batteries used in such EVs as the GM EV1. Li-ion construction is favourable due to its any-time charging capability and overnight charging benefits (Tesla recommends topping it off overnight to ensure good battery life). The catch of the Li-ion battery being that acceleration performance decreases with battery charge. Tesla expects fuel savings within 5 years to be about $8,000 compared to the 535i.
The usability doesn’t stop there. The Model S is in fact a 7-seater. There are two rear-facing “jump seats” in the rear trunk that can be folded down for use of children 10 years of age and younger. When these are stowed, the car turns back to a normal-looking 5-seater. Tesla also puts quite an emphasis on safety. There are 8 airbags standard on the Model S, and the car features a largely aluminum structure that saves both weight and improves rigidity. For those technically inclined, the IP is now a 17-inch touchscreen which houses controls such as navigation, climate, audio, etc.

What does this mean for us Canucks? Those of you that are more familiar with the concept of snow have probably noted earlier that the car is rear-wheel-drive. However, a lot of weight is on those back tires, and Tesla assures us that the Model S is designed for both summer and winter driving. Downsides for us here up in the north? Well, so far there is only one Tesla dealer in Canada, which is in Toronto. Also, you can only get your Model S serviced there. Great for Ontarians, kind of lame for the rest of us especially since there is a market for it in places such as Vancouver.

Fortunately, EVs - like the Model S - require much lesser service than conventional cars, namely because there are no crazy moving parts and pumps to mess up. Other than tire rotations and other unmentionables, the Tesla should only be in the shop if there is damage or other problems. Warranty information has yet to be released, but the batteries are covered for 8 years or 160,000km.
There are a few trims that will be available at launch. Base Model S’s can be had with any of the three batteries, and all of the options available in the standard range for $49,900USD after the tax incentive (Canadian pricing hasn’t been announced, but expect it to be maybe a few grand more). The Model S Performance will be able to accelerate from 0-100km/h in 4.4 seconds compared to the base’s 5.6 seconds in 85kWh guise. This model is priced at $79,900USD in comparison. Double the price for bragging rights.

The first 200 delivered models in Canada will be the Model S “Signature” which is a limited edition model. The Signature features special paint, interior, and exterior options, and will be available with both base and Performance powertrains. Tesla is expected to produce 5,000 units this year, with an annual target of 20,000 units in the coming years. Reservation deposits are currently being held starting at $5,000 for the Model S/Performance and $40,000 for the Model S Signature (in both US and Canada.)

To summarise: Practical? 7-seater sedan with as much room as a 5-Series and can travel as far as a 5-Series? Check. Environmentally friendly? 60% recycled material in the interior and zero-emissions? Check. Pricey? $49,900US for a luxury electric vehicle? In check. Good-looking? That’s up to you to pen in.
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Most helpful post: The members here have rated this post as best reply.
Liberalman
#2
The all electric buses did not do to well in cold climates like Toronto so these cars won't be any good here Ethanol is the way to go up here
 
Walter
+5
#3  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by Liberalman View Post

The all electric buses did not do to well in cold climates like Toronto so these cars won't be any good here Ethanol is the way to go up here

Ethanol is a tax on the poor since it uses up valuable farmland to produce corn which is used to make ethanol. This causes food prices to rise since corn is used in hundreds if not thousands of food products. We have plenty of oil and natural gas to last us for hundreds of years so let's continue with what we've got and make those fuels more efficient.
 
captain morgan
+2
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Ethanol is a tax on the poor since it uses up valuable farmland to produce corn which is used to make ethanol. This causes food prices to rise since corn is used in hundreds if not thousands of food products. We have plenty of oil and natural gas to last us for hundreds of years so let's continue with what we've got and make those fuels more efficient.


The Liberals love taxes... No need to employ the obvious or be creative when you can just tax everyone to death
 
Tonington
#5
Passed one of these on the way home from work last night, with Wisconsin plates! PEI is a long ways from the American Midwest. He was traveling close to 100 km/hr. Sharp looking car. A bit out of my price range though, and I drive a perfectly good Corolla right now. Maybe in another ten years!
 
#juan
+1
#6
Complete waste of time and money. Today it is possible to get over two hundred horsepower from a two and a half litre
four cylinder engine. ad an electric motor and a battery system and with the Tesla's aerodynamic body they could have
a very good hybrid for less money and it would use gas from the existing gas pumps.
 
L Gilbert
#7
I wonder how it would do carrying my toolboxes and stuff. Wifey wonders how well it'd do carrying sacks of chicken feed and boxes of fruit from her trees. Paid less than half the price of one of those things for my truck and less than a third for wifey's Dakota.
I wonder what the environmental impact of manufacturing these things is.
I think we'll wait for something nuclear powered; steam-generated power is indomitable.
 
Liberalman
-2
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Ethanol is a tax on the poor since it uses up valuable farmland to produce corn which is used to make ethanol. This causes food prices to rise since corn is used in hundreds if not thousands of food products. We have plenty of oil and natural gas to last us for hundreds of years so let's continue with what we've got and make those fuels more efficient.

Fracking is killing the water supply but at least we will have corn that can be regrown
 
BruSan
+2
#9
Well Rachel since you've obviously done a google search for any and all forums with Canadian header bar and copy posted to all of them; I'm forced to conclude your interests are commercially motivated and might be violating TOS's on at least one or two of them..

That doesn't serve to automaticallly discount the merits of their content or product but here's a thought or two:

A company who would resort to disguising it's efforts to advertise would be a company you could then rely upon to be wholly honest in ALL of it's claims?

Canada needs an over priced luxury electric car like it needs another Member of Parliament.

A car that utilizes a source of energy that has of yet to be embraced by ANY of the worlds automotive markets.

A car expected to operate in the colder climes of Canada where it would be required to utilize a significant portion of it's stored energy to heat/defrost the thing thereby adding immeasurably to the already increased frequency of re-charge cycles due to the colder climate.

A car whose battery lifespan would be reduced in concert with the above would save mechanical repair costs but replace those with one humdinger of a battery replacement cost I believe would not only overshadow your saved mechanical repair costs by a significant margin but also serve to eat away at those vaunted fuel savings you've touted.

A car that upon discovering it might not be the vehicle of desire and wishing to sell it would suddenly become an albatross around your neck because the first question a potential buyer asks would be "have you done the battery replacement or would I be hit with that right after purchase"?

A car that regardless of the availability of electical power all over the place; where are you going to get compliance to allow you to plug it in at any location you might need to. AND to avail yourself of the 240 volt premium charge system: where are you going to find the 50 amp 4 prong (electric dryer type) outlet AND probably a 25' extension cord to enable that little feature?

From having RV's with that 50 amp service feature I can tell you that one of those cords is brutally heavy and an absolute bear to wrestle around and coil up when cold. Hello Rachel; it's OFTEN cold in Canada.

VW has just invested millions into further develpment of the Ballard Hydrogen fuel cell; a source of energy that has been reliably motivating busloads of folks back and forth from Vancouver environs to Whistler mountain for years now. and I will await whatever comes from that before committing to an overpriced bragging banner.

In short, this thing will very likely appeal to the same niche market that bought Hummers and as soon the sacrifice in convenience, depreciation and economy are fully realized, could become a red-headed step child just as quickly.
Last edited by BruSan; Mar 16th, 2013 at 03:28 PM..
 
Dexter Sinister
+2
#10
Glad I'm not the only one who thought the OP looked like a press release.
 
BruSan
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Dexter Sinister View Post

Glad I'm not the only one who thought the OP looked like a press release.


Yeah that very same word for word offering suddenly appeared on a number of boards I peruse along with a brand new registration profile.

The mod's of some boards will undoubtedly take umbrage at some point if TOS's have been abused. Not a steller manner in which to put your product out there. Could be something simple like she or her family are percentage backers in some fashion.

Still, not kosher.

***EDIT***

Upon perusing her profile stats it would seem she's made two posts to date and in the other post clearly identifys herself as an employee/officer of Solica Corp., the company mentioned in her post this thread. Oooopsy.
Last edited by BruSan; Mar 16th, 2013 at 05:55 PM..Reason: more info
 
Timetrvlr
#12
I thought BruSan (three posts up) did a pretty good job of explaining why any all-electric automobile would not be a good choice for most Canadians. I do think that rechargeable hybrid vehicles are a the wave of the foreseeable future.

It's a 130 Km from where I live to the nearest large town where we must go quite often for medical specialists appointments or to do major shopping. Murphy's Law dictates that most of those appointments are done in blizzard conditions and really cold days. I really can't see myself looking all over town for a 240V plug-in under those conditions.
 
BruSan
#13
Here Ya go Rachel:

Tesla vs Media AGAIN as Model S craps out on journo - on the highway ? The Register

No better illustration could be shown as to the unsuitability of this thing for a Canadian climate.
 
taxslave
#14
Several Places on Vancouver Island now have public charging stations. Installed with tax dollars.
 

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