Trudeau and the Pipelines


Mowich
+5
#61
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

This is why, they won't arrest the protestors but remove their blockade, and YOU will be arrested.

https://www.thepostmillennial.com/va...line-blockade/


Two videos in the article caught my attention - both are well worth watching. The first is a video of a CBC segment taken from a broadcast last night. CBC journalist Paul Tasker explains in no uncertain terms and with firm data to back up his words, the fact that the majority of FN bands are in favor of both the Coastal Gaslink line and the TM twinning enumerating the various reasons they do so and mentioning the many consultations leading up to the approvals. He also makes a point about the fallacy of lumping all Indigenous peoples into one homogeneous group. They are not. FNs opinions on Indigenous issues vary just as much as do those of other Canadians. Never thought I would applaud the CBC for anything but I give them kudos for this and to Paul Tasker who had the courage to tell it like it is.

The other video shows a young man trying to get to an appointment where there are a dozen or more people waiting for his arrival. The protestors have blocked both bridges and he has no way of getting across.

At one point he says "Are you trying to garner support? Cause this is not the way to do it." He isn't shouting. He isn't yelling. He does sound frustrated and with good reason but not once does he raise his voice. He sounds reasonable in the face of unreasonableness.

Only one woman out of a group of about twenty from what I could see in the video bothered to address his questions. Unfortunately, instead of an articulate answer all the young man got was activists sloganeering.

He replies. "I'm not arguing with your outlook, I might even agree with your outlook. But the point is I need to get across the bridge. How am I supposed to do that?

He too, I applaud.
 
Most helpful post: The members here have rated this post as best reply.
petros
+3
#62
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The beginning of the end...
Andrew Scheer and the Conservative Party are going after the federal government, tabling a non-confidence motion in response to how Ottawa has dealt with ongoing protests and blockades across the country, and how the prime minister seems to be in no rush to solve the issue.
More to come.

Apparently they didnt table it....yet.
 
taxslave
+3
#63
Conservatives are caught between a rock and a hard place. With a leadership race in progress they can't trigger an election at least until fall.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#64
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

Dude is going by the name “Poundmaker” & not his surname is Poundmaker. I see where the confusion would be.....

Just by the 2 of them using names associated with North Battleford in Edmonton is a sure sign of being transplants.
 
petros
+5
#65
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Conservatives are caught between a rock and a hard place. With a leadership race in progress they can't trigger an election at least until fall.

It wont be long....

 
captain morgan
+4
#66
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Small business owners demand an end to rail blockades, warn of consequences

The Courts and Cops responded to the Unifor blockade very rapidly including significant fines



Kinda makes you wonder why this same dynamic isn't happening here


Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

This could get violent. The idiot protesters are now deep in oil country, and even more interesting, on the city limits of Edmonton. I can see this getting violent within a few days, if the Police and Government do not do their jobs.


I kinda hope it does... The 'Protestors' will get their collective asses handed to them and come to the realization that there are very real consequences to their actions.


Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Conservatives are caught between a rock and a hard place. With a leadership race in progress they can't trigger an election at least until fall.


Maybe a second chance for Scheer?


Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

It wont be long....


I'm guessing that tater tot has been down that road more than once
 
Twin_Moose
+3
#67
And then the front runner backs down if this is the future of the Con. party no thanks having no spine

Peter MacKay Deletes Blockades Tweet That Spurred Accusations He Backs Vigilantism

Quote:

A front-runner for the federal Conservative party leadership has deleted a tweet that praised citizens opposed to rail blockades for taking matters into their own hands.
Peter MacKay, a former federal justice minister and attorney general, took to Twitter Wednesday to laud counter-protesters who tried to remove parts of a blockade erected on a Canadian National rail line in Edmonton.
“Glad to see a couple Albertans with a pickup truck can do more for our economy in an afternoon than Justin Trudeau could do in four years,” MacKay wrote in the deleted tweet, responding to a post from Global News reporter Fletcher Kent...…...More

Easy target for the paid for Liberal media if he back peddles
 
Mowich
+3
#68
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

And then the front runner backs down if this is the future of the Con. party no thanks having no spine

Peter MacKay Deletes Blockades Tweet That Spurred Accusations He Backs Vigilantism



Easy target for the paid for Liberal media if he back peddles

Precisely why I do not want to see him as leader of our party.
 
Jinentonix
+4
#69
Quote:

He also makes a point about the fallacy of lumping all Indigenous peoples into one homogeneous group.

Tsk tsk. Damn racists.
The typical racist leftard: "Not only do Natives think as a single bloc, I presume to speak for that bloc."


Ya know, you'd think if these so-called "activists" really cared about the Native people, they'd be all fired up about the reserves that don't have access to clean drinking water. But nope, clearly the enviro-racists only care about pushing their own agenda and are only too happy to simply use the Natives in Eastern Canada who are anti-pipeline to do it.



What you're seeing from the ALT-left here and in the rest of the Western World is a systematic attack on all of the values the Western World was built on. Things like family, community, rule of law, to name just a few. Is it perfect? Nope, no system is. But this garbage where a tiny minority can hold a country hostage while damaging its economy and reputation when it comes to trade and all the govt does is tell us they are "dialoguing" with them as we speak is utter nonsense. How the hell is THAT an improvement on anything?


Maybe the govt needs to start teaching people about how far certain rights can legally go. Like the right to protest.
 
Mowich
+2
#70
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Tsk tsk. Damn racists.
The typical racist leftard: "Not only do Natives think as a single bloc, I presume to speak for that bloc."


Ya know, you'd think if these so-called "activists" really cared about the Native people, they'd be all fired up about the reserves that don't have access to clean drinking water. But nope, clearly the enviro-racists only care about pushing their own agenda and are only too happy to simply use the Natives in Eastern Canada who are anti-pipeline to do it.

What you're seeing from the ALT-left here and in the rest of the Western World is a systematic attack on all of the values the Western World was built on. Things like family, community, rule of law, to name just a few. Is it perfect? Nope, no system is. But this garbage where a tiny minority can hold a country hostage while damaging its economy and reputation when it comes to trade and all the govt does is tell us they are "dialoguing" with them as we speak is utter nonsense. How the hell is THAT an improvement on anything?


Maybe the govt needs to start teaching people about how far certain rights can legally go. Like the right to protest.


 
Twin_Moose
+4
#71
Trudeau calls blockades an 'unacceptable situation' ahead of cabinet meeting

Quote:

…………….Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller said he and Bennett are ready to meet with the chiefs "on a moment's notice."
"Everyone wants to take the air out of this balloon in the most controlled way. Most people are coming at us with a pin, but that's not the solution," Miller said, citing Conservative demands to have police enforce a court injunction allowing law enforcement to dismantle the blockades.
"We ask for a little more patience because there is a real opportunity here to show the world we can resolve these issues in a peaceful way," Miller said.
Speaking in the Commons Thursday, Bennett said Ottawa is committed to working with the Wet'suwet'en to affirm their Indigenous rights and title to the land and "clarify the path forward."
As it stands, the federal government does not recognize Wet'suwet'en claims to the area where the natural gas pipeline will be built. She said she wants to discuss these long-term issues but also the "urgent" matter of the blockades in a face-to-face meeting.
"We are at a critical time in Canada. We need to deal effectively with the uncertainty," Bennett said. "I am hoping to be able to return to B.C. as soon as possible to continue that work."
Bennett called on the hereditary chiefs to ask their Mohawk allies to dismantle the rail blockade in southern Ontario.
"We hope that the Wet'suwet'en will be able to express to those in solidarity with them that it is now time to stand down and let us get back to work," Bennett said...……….More

Looks like they are going to forcefully beg and plead to remove the blockades, yeah, yeah that's the ticket you show them who's boss /smh
 
Mowich
+4
#72
Indigenous pipeline supporters speaking up

Houston resident and Wet’suwet’en member Marion Tiljoe Shepherd addresses about 200 supporters of the Coastal GasLink pipeline who gathered in Houston Wednesday afternoon to hear from Indigenous leaders in favour of the project.

The event, which hosted five speakers, was organized by The North Matters, a natural resource industry lobby group that started in Kitimat.

Spokesperson Steve Simons said national attention has focused largely on opposition to the pipeline, while the voices of many Wet’suwet’en members who support the project have been drowned out by negative news coverage. Wednesday’s gathering was billed as an event to bring the community together by allowing Indigenous members the chance to share their perspectives in a safe environment, free from intimidation and fear of harm.

Tiljoe Shepherd told the crowd mistakes were made on all sides, contributing to what’s now a national crisis, but the division within her community is what’s most difficult to endure.

“We’re ostracized just because we want to work,” she said. “We’re from an industrial town and we’ve always worked for industry.


There’s two sides to every story.”

Wet’suwet’en pipeline supporters speak up

“The protesters get one side of the story, and they stand up with their fists in the air”: Skin

As protests across the country continue to plague construction of Coastal GasLink’s (CGL) pipeline through Wet’suwet’en territory, about 200 supporters of the project gathered in Houston Wednesday afternoon to hear from Indigenous leaders eager to see the pipeline completed.

The event, which hosted five speakers, was organized by The North Matters, a natural resource industry lobby group.

“The protesters get one side of the story, and they want to stand up with their fists in the air,” Robert Skin, an elected councillor for the Skin Tyee Nation, which is part of the Wet’suwet’en Nation. “Come and listen to us. Get both sides of the story before you go out and stop traffic and stop the rail line. All you’re doing is alienating people who are trying to put a roof over their children’s heads and food on their table.”

Skin praised CGL for its consultation with elders and leaders, saying the company went on numerous interpretive walks through the nation’s traditional territory to map out the best possible route for the pipeline.

Nationwide protests and blockades of rail lines followed a move by RCMP to enforce a court injunction earlier this month against the hereditary chiefs and their supporters, who had been obstructing an access road to the CGL’s work site.

Four of the five Hereditary chiefs flew to Ontario Wednesday to thank Mohawk supporters blocking key rail lines.

Spokesperson for The North Matters, Steve Simons, said his group organized the event at Houston’s Pleasant Valley Plaza Theatre because national attention has focused largely on opposition to the pipeline, while the voices of many Wet’suwet’en members who support the project have been drowned out by negative news coverage, fracturing communities down racial lines across the Northwest.

Wednesday’s gathering was billed as an event to bring the community together by allowing Indigenous members in support of the project the chance to share their perspectives in a safe environment, free from intimidation and fear of harm.

Skin commended CGL for its ecological and cultural sensitivity and said his nation’s benefit agreement with the company is key to the prosperity of future generations. Some of the money has already been used for professional training among members. More has been earmarked to help alleviate a housing crisis and allow more members to move back to their community, Skin said.

“Instead of saying ‘no’ to everybody all the time, now we can say ‘yes, we have the money for housing. Yes, we have the money for education’.”

The North Matters organized the session over the long weekend, to which Simons said he was pleased at the number of people who came out, particularly because it took place in the afternoon.

“There’s been a lot of bullying going on. And intimidation. Intimidation into silence,” Simons said of what Wet’suwet’en supporters of the pipeline have faced through social media and other means.

“What we wanted was a place where people could speak without fear of a backlash.”

A Victoria resident and mostly now retired but who does offer courses and speaks on natural resource issues, Simons said he concentrates on trying to deescalate hard line ‘yes’ and ‘no’ positions on resource development. He volunteered his time for the North Matters event.

“What I try to do is reach out for solutions for common values,” said Simons.

Speaker Marion Tiljoe Shepherd echoed those calls for solutions.

She owns her own trucking company in Houston and is a member of the Wet’suwet’en Gilseyhu (Big Frog) clan. Her mother is a shareholder of a trap line near the pipeline route where police have twice raided protest camps.

"It’s been really hard for us,” she said to the audience. “I love my family, and my mom misses her family… but because we live here in Houston, we’re ostracized just because we want to work. We’re from an industrial town and we’ve always worked for industry. There’s two sides to every story.”

While a staunch supporter of the industry, Tiljoe Shepherd told the crowd mistakes were made on all sides, including CGL’s ineffective consultation with hereditary chiefs, and the chiefs failure to consult with their members. But she also lays a lot of blame on the protesters who mobilized around the hereditary chiefs without access to other points of view.

“Who do you think you are?” she said of the protesters. “I didn’t ask you for help. I can speak for myself.

“My choice is my choice. My husband and I have a job. We want to work for CGL; we want to work for the industry, and we have every right to.”

www.interior-news.com/news/indigenous-pipeline-supporters-speaking-up/
 
Mowich
+3
#73
Chris Selley: Hypocritical Liberals are out to sea on rail blockade

The stupefying weightlessness of Justin Trudeau’s government has never been more evident than in recent days, as it tries to arrange an end to the Mohawk blockade of CN’s main line near Belleville, Ont. At times it seems as if it might just float away, like an improperly tethered bouncy castle in a thunderstorm.

This week has been particularly windy.

Trudeau stood in the House of Commons earlier this week and appealed for calm debate on how best to resolve the blockade, which is in support of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs and in shared opposition to the Coastal GasLink pipeline project that runs through their territory thousands of kilometres to the west.

“The place for these debates is here in this House,” Trudeau said. “We need to ensure we … listen to each other.” They must avoid, he said, “a desire to listen only to ourselves and to people who agree with us.”

Outgoing Conservative leader Andrew Scheer responded with a reasonable and impassioned defence of the people affected by the blockade, and of the rank-and-file Wet’suwet’en members and their elected band councils who support the pipeline.

His views will be shared by millions of Canadians, probably the majority. Trudeau deemed them “disqualifying,” and refused to invite Scheer to a meeting of party leaders to discuss the crisis.

That was the day’s — year’s? Century’s? — champion hypocrisy, but there were others. Days after telling reporters “we are not the kind of country where politicians … tell the police what to do in operational matters,” Trudeau advised police not to enforce the court order demanding an end to the blockade.

“(To) those who … think that using force is helpful — it is not,” he intoned. “In the past, we have seen just how quickly these situations can change,” he added, invoking the spectres of Oka and Ipperwash.

Strangely, neither Trudeau nor his ministers objected to the RCMP’s “use of force” in clearing the Wet’suwet’en protest camps, which went off with a minimum of drama.

Indeed, the Oka Crisis — which Transport Minister Marc Garneau has cited explicitly — is a ludicrously inflammatory analogy. That conflict pitted hundreds of Mohawk Warriors and their supporters against hundreds of Sûreté du Québec SWAT forces and Canadian troops. There were firefights. Counter-protesters taunted the Mohawks as “savages,” and burned a warrior in effigy. “The Indians should be all sent to Labrador,” the local Tory MP averred.

Near Belleville we have a few peaceful people camped out next to the tracks, who are demonstrably willing to talk. Canadians, in the main, are being remarkably patient. So long as the court order is enforced reasonably and proportionately — which Oka was decidedly not — it is not a disaster waiting to happen.

So the government is clear: We don’t tell the cops what to do, but we might strongly suggest they do nothing. On Tuesday evening, CBC’s Vassy Kapelos suggested an intriguing third option: Asking the cops to undo something they have already done. Wet’suwet’en hereditary chief Woos told Kapelos there would be no negotiations until the RCMP vacate the area along the Coastal GasLink pipeline route in B.C where the force has been effectively clearing out the original blockades. So, Kapelos asked Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller, would the government ask the RCMP to vamoose?

The correct answer was “no.” Never mind police independence, the RCMP aren’t even acting on Wet’suwet’en territory as federal agents — rather as British Columbia’s provincial police. Astonishingly, Miller didn’t rule it out. On Wednesday, Public Safety Minister Bill Blair confirmed he has had “a number of discussions” with B.C. Solicitor-General Mike Farnworth about “a number of different measures that could address some of the concerns.”

The situation is ludicrous: Because Ontario’s independent provincial police won’t enforce a court injunction, the federal public safety minister seems to be in discussions with B.C.’s solicitor general about whether B.C.’s independent provincial police might back off enforcing a different injunction.

And the worst part of this absurdist theatre festival is how difficult it is to imagine a better alternative. Conservatives continue to call on Trudeau to somehow fix the problem, but the way Canada is set up, it’s really not a federal issue. The RCMP might have some jurisdiction over the railway as federally regulated infrastructure, said University of Toronto law professor Kent Roach, but that hasn’t happened in past cases. It wouldn’t even be up to Trudeau to send in troops: under the Emergencies Act, Roach said, a provincial solicitor-general has to request it.

These are structural issues that any PM will face. Indeed, the biggest difference between the Liberals’ approach to this blockade and the Conservatives’ approach to the 2013 Idle No More protests, which included a 13-day blockade of a CN line in southwestern Ontario, has been one of rhetoric and engagement. The Conservatives talked tougher, but Aboriginal Affairs rebuffed CN’s request to intervene. (Those protesters eventually obeyed a court injunction and left.) The Liberals needlessly tie themselves in knots and insult our intelligence — they know no other way — but they clearly believe it’s their job to broker some kind of resolution.

It’s tough to say which approach is likelier to work. At this point odds seem to favour “neither.” If you have a better, workable idea to get the trains moving, for God’s sake get on the horn to Ottawa.

nationalpost.com/opinion/chris-selley-hypocritical-liberals-are-out-to-sea-on-rail-blockade
 
Girth
+2
#74
Wet'suwet'en not behind rail blockades, protests: B.C. MLA

Aidan Wallace

February 19, 2020

Things may not be as they seem.

That was the message from B.C. Opposition MLA Ellis Ross — an elected chief councillor of the Haisla Nation — on Wednesday as political and economic pressure to end rail blockades increased.

“It’s not (the Wet’suwet’en) behind the shutdown,” Ross told The Toronto Sun.

As to who really speaks for the Wet’suwet’en, “It’s hard to say,” the Liberal MLA explained. “I don’t think they’ve been given any process to determine who speaks for them … Every band has their own leadership structure.”

According to Ross, there are many organizations taking donations and setting up GoFundMe campaigns that are manipulating the pipeline protest to further agendas that “have no interest in the betterment of Aboriginals.”

“Look at their fundraisers in the United States, their agenda is to stop fossil fuel use,” said Ross, who added that some organizations are playing on a “white guilt complex.”

But the term reconciliation is now being used by third-party organizations to “pit First Nations against First Nations,” Ross said.

Ross insisted those who argue the government forced the pipeline without proper consent on First Nations are wrong.

“It has been 15 years of consultations,” Ross said, explaining there are real economic benefits the pipeline would provide members of the Haisla Nation.


“All First Nations are dependant on Ottawa funding to provide things like water and keeping roads clear,” Ross said, adding that “the Indian Act in today’s context is irrelevant.”

Generating revenue through means other than the Indian Act and acquiring land with strategic value, has provided “the first glimpse of self-determination” for the Haisla Nation.

For his band, Ross said the pipeline would mean “revenue for the lifetime of the project” and employment.

“I found out a long time ago the government can’t help you, there’s not enough money in the world,” Ross said. He added that for bands which require help, there’s no harm in Ottawa providing it.

source: https://torontosun.com/news/national...otests-b-c-mla

Finding a solution to the current problem isn’t straightforward, but Ross said it might start with Canadians listening to “the people on the ground from day one, the Aboriginal leaders that want to make sure they get out of poverty.”
 
Girth
+5
#75
Bell: Trudeau bumbling, this clown show ain't done yet

Rick Bell
Published:
February 20, 2020



Counter protesters tear down a blockade along the CN rail line in Edmonton Wednesday Feb. 19, 2020. A separate group of protesters had set up the blockade in solidarity with Wet'suwet'en Hereditary Chiefs. Photo by David Bloom

This is what happens, prime minister.

This is what happens when working folks are fed up and the law they’re told to respect isn’t respected and the government they’re told represents them isn’t representing them.

Guys like Guy Simpson show up, an oilfield worker from Leduc, a city just south of Edmonton.

An illegal blockade of wooden pallets and signs goes up on the west edge of Edmonton, right on the Canadian National rail line.

The railway goes to court to try to derail the copycats, at least on paper. Doug Schweitzer, Alberta’s top lawman, says we won’t be hostages to lawbreakers.

But Simpson sees the blockade on social media.

Reports say a handful of people like Simpson show up. One barrel is removed. Then everything goes. The blockade is gone. The trains can run.

“One blockade at a time. I’ll clean it up,” says Simpson.

But there are too many Justin Trudeaus and not enough Guy Simpsons and the illegal blockades are treated with kid gloves.

Canada, where is your courage?

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney gives what’s going on a name. Anarchy.

The dictionary says anarchy is a state of disorder due to an absence or non-recognition of authority.

Yep, we’re there.

“Enough is enough,” says the premier.

If only that was true. But we will have to endure more mayhem before the circus packs up and leaves town.

We need a little gallows humour while we’re being hung out to dry.

“At least the prime minister decided not to go to the Caribbean this week so at least he’s in Ottawa. I’ll take that as a small sign of progress,” says Kenney.

It gets a laugh in Calgary.


Alberta Premier Jason Kenney speaks at the Peter Lougheed Centre in northeast Calgary on Wednesday, February 19, 2020. Jim Wells/Postmedia

In Ottawa, Trudeau says his government is doing everything it can. They’re exhausting every effort.

But he doesn’t mention a plan. He doesn’t even hint at a deadline when all this will be over.

Instead, the prime minister talks about wanting to talk but he goes on about various leaders and various Indigenous groups and how the situation is oh-so-complex.

In northern B.C., the overwhelming majority of the Wet’suwet’en people want the Coastal GasLink pipeline as do the local politicians they elect.

Even most of the hereditary chiefs are on board — but not all.

Those opposed want the RCMP out and Trudeau figures that’s a good idea. It’s cool to maybe get the cops to NOT enforce the law but to have them lay down the law just can’t be done.

Is Trudeau or one of his inner circle going to meet with these hereditary chiefs?

The PM’s people are willing to sit down but he says the chiefs are “continuing to reflect.”

Continuing to what?

“We are impressing upon them the urgency with which they really need to engage on paths forward,” says Trudeau.

So much for urgency.

Alas, the leaders are not available right now.

Four of them are said to be going down to Ontario to hang out with their Mohawk comrades, including those at the illegal blockade. So I guess we wait.

Trudeau is nothing if not predictable.

His song and dance does sell to those Canadians who, like him, don’t want to be “overly aggressive” and never, ever want to “raise the temperature.”


My thermometer’s reading is getting ever closer to that blood boiling number.

Conservative MP Mark Strahl from B.C. sounds like he’s getting there.

“Will he continue to embolden the mob that is giving the courts the Trudeau salute?” says Strahl, of the prime minister.

The Trudeau salute. Don’t tempt me. Please don’t tempt me.

It is the kind of day where a Mohawk chief who suggests taking down the barricades as a sign of good faith and compassion and gets locked out of his band office then turns around and walks back what he said.

Apparently, after spending some time back home, he realizes he made a mistake.


Layoffs continue. A thousand at Via Rail and there are other workers getting bad news at other businesses.

The premiers are now calling for a teleconference chinwag with Trudeau Thursday to try to find an end to this tiresome tale.

Love to be a fly on that wall.

How long will this go on? Why don’t they do something?

For now, there are no answers, only more questions.
 
Mowich
+4
#76
Aides restrain Trudeau to prevent him resolving Wet’suwet’en blockade with “perfect costume”

By
Ian MacIntyre
thebeaverton.com
1 min


OTTAWA — As Wet’suwet’en railway blockades across Canada continue with no end in sight, PMO aides have reportedly been forced to physically restrain Prime Minister Trudeau to stop him from delving into his costume chest in an attempt to aid negotiations.

Sources report that Trudeau has repeatedly offered to “play dress up” as an olive branch to the Wet’suwet’en protestors. Insiders claim Trudeau has repeatedly insisted, “I have an outfit the hereditary chiefs will love, right here in my tickle trunk!”

Staffers have reportedly hidden Trudeau’s “tickle trunk” somewhere high up in the Peace Tower in order to thwart the costume-loving Prime Minister. “But he just keeps finding it,” added one frustrated aide.

In addition, until the Wet’suwet’en blockades can be negotiated to a close, the Prime Minister has been sequestered in his Parliament Hill office with no access to any clothing more flamboyant than his standard brightly-coloured socks.

Political observers point to Trudeau’s history of negotiating while wearing “themed costumes” as a reason for caution during the Wet’suwet’en pipeline protest. Aides recall talking Trudeau out of donning a yellow safety vest during last year’s protests, “to be part of the fun”. Even more infamous were the PM’s costume choices during an official trip to India, as well as his recently-discovered use of blackface to “fit in” to an overtly racist high school project.

“He keeps insisting that this outfit will solve everything,” explained one beleagured assistant, as they hid a Coachella-style feathered headdress. “We told him if he sticks to suits and ties all year then he gets a treat on Halloween, but no sooner.”

At press time Prime Minister is at large, having reportedly escaped from his office by posing as a moustachioed custodian with a questionable accent.

www.thebeaverton.com/2020/02/aides-restrain-trudeau-to-prevent-him-resolving-wetsuweten-blockade-with-perfect-costume/
 
taxslave
+6
#77
Today my nephew, who works for the Colorado government sent me a news item from Texas. Seems Texans don't take kindly to riffraff and passed a law making protesting pipelines a criminal offence. Now that is the proper way to deal with terrorism.
 
Twin_Moose
+4
#78
PMJT doesn't agree with you Taxslave he believes in buying them off is the winning formula what a maroon

Government asking for an extra $2.1 billion for Indigenous programs

Quote:

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government is asking Parliament to spend an additional $2.1 billion on Indigenous programs and initiatives, above and beyond what MPs already have approved.
While $2 billion of the proposed spending for Indigenous services would be new money, supplementary estimates tabled in Parliament show that more than $53 million in net transfers from various departments would go to a wide range of Indigenous programs and projects.
Among other things, the government is proposing an additional $52.9 million for the RCMP for First Nations Community Policing Services and $1.2 million for Library and Archives Canada to help it preserve Indigenous culture and language recordings...……..On and On

 
Twin_Moose
+3
#79
Premiers tell Trudeau 'patience is wearing thin' with Indigenous-led blockades

Quote:

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau spoke with provincial premiers late Thursday and they expressed frustration with Ottawa's response to the ongoing Indigenous-led rail blockades.
Provincial sources, speaking to CBC News on background, said some premiers told Trudeau that "patience is wearing thin" in their communities. The protests have lasted more than two weeks and forced 1,500 railway workers temporarily out of a job.
Some premiers also expressed concern about the advent of counter-protests, which have popped up at the sites of some Indigenous blockades, notably in Edmonton on Wednesday.
While frustrated, there was no consensus among the provincial leaders as to what Ottawa should do...........More

 
Twin_Moose
+4
#80
Vaughn Palmer: Horgan's pipeline patience running out, refuses to cave to 'minority'

Quote:

VICTORIA — Premier John Horgan displayed signs of frustration and a flash or two of anger Thursday during his weekly media conference with members of the legislative press gallery.
This being budget week, he would normally have fielded questions about taxes, spending and the NDP’s struggle to keep the books in balance.
Instead, pretty much all the questions were about protests, blockades and the continuing standoff over the Coastal GasLink pipeline.

Horgan spoke to reporters later in the morning, before a scheduled conference call with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the other first ministers.
He hoped that exchange will move things along: “There are moments I believe in our confederation where what we require is unanimity of purpose. … And I believe we’re there today. We’ll see what the PM brings to the table.”
But the B.C. premier didn’t minimize the challenge of establishing “a common understanding” of the complexities in this province, while the national economy hangs in the balance.
“Other premiers needed to be brought up to speed on what the problem is here,” said Horgan, adding in a knowing aside, “I well imagine many BCers feel the same way.
“When they see protests that are unlawful, they would expect that there would be some reason for that, and they don’t understand how elected band councils could have said yes and other hereditary leaders have said no.”
Horgan continued to hold out hope for talks to resolve the standoff between the elected leaders and some hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en who support the project and the handful of hereditary chiefs opposed......More

 
petros
+1
#81
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Precisely why I do not want to see him as leader of our party.

Leslyn Lewis. I'd love to see a black woman as a CPC PM.
 
petros
+3
#82
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Vaughn Palmer: Horgan's pipeline patience running out, refuses to cave to 'minority'

Sorry Horgan but I cant for the life of me have any empathy.
 
B00Mer
+6
#83
 
taxslave
+3
#84
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

PMJT doesn't agree with you Taxslave he believes in buying them off is the winning formula what a maroon
Government asking for an extra $2.1 billion for Indigenous programs

Throwing money at a problem won't necessarily fix it. Especially when most of that money will de devoured by bureaucraps and consultants. Indian Affairs is an industry that insiders on both sides want to keep healthy.
 
taxslave
+3
#85
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Sorry Horgan but I cant for the life of me have any empathy.

Horgans owners told him their membership is not happy with his lack of action. Which is funny because Horgan campaigned against pipelines.
 
pgs
+3
#86
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

PMJT doesn't agree with you Taxslave he believes in buying them off is the winning formula what a maroon

Government asking for an extra $2.1 billion for Indigenous programs

Well Petros said it is always about money .
 
DaSleeper
+4
#87
Poor cliffy is a charter member of the wannabe and gimme tribe
 
captain morgan
+3
#88
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

PMJT doesn't agree with you Taxslave he believes in buying them off is the winning formula what a maroon

Government asking for an extra $2.1 billion for Indigenous programs


Gosh, maybe having this pipeline might inject a crap-ton of cash into a couple dozen FN communities?


tater tot really ought to put together a blue ribbon, Royal Commission to study this possibility


Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Leslyn Lewis. I'd love to see a black woman as a CPC PM.


I'd like to see Guy Simpson from the Rick Bell article be PM
 
Girth
+4
#89
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

Poor cliffy is a charter member of the wannabe and gimme tribe

 
Mowich
+2
#90
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

PMJT doesn't agree with you Taxslave he believes in buying them off is the winning formula what a maroon

Government asking for an extra $2.1 billion for Indigenous programs

They still haven't paid off the Sixties Scoop suit which is another few million. They are still in court over the residential day school students - another few million there if the wanna-bees get their way. Canada has wasted billions of dollars trying to prop up native communities who have no other source of income. Yet when given a chance to stand on their own two feet by signing on with resource companies - the only way for them to actually see a source of revenue - the liberals bring in Bill C-49, Bill C-69, Bill C-48 that would effectively prevent them from doing so. Then when a handful of chiefs - who had every chance over a decade to make their concerns known but chose to sit on their asses until the agreements were signed - rise up in protest and erect illegal blockades who is it that the spineless liberals want to meet with - not the bands who want to improve their living situation - not a frickin' chance they get a meet and greet.


Meanwhile another blockade is going up in Manitoba and the oil-hating so-called hereditary chiefs had no problem driving their gas guzzling cars all the way across Canada to meet with the no-skin-in-the-game mohawks. Never crossed their hypocritical minds to hire a propane -fueled bus..........nah.
Last edited by Mowich; Feb 21st, 2020 at 12:47 PM..