Winds fan ferocious fires in Australia's most populous state


Serryah
+1
#61
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Science is now saying humanity started in Europe.


No it's not... do you pay attention at all?
 
Serryah
#62
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

I certainly can.

By the way, what great achievements have your people come up with, other than totem poles, wigwams and mouth slapping? Anything actually worthwhile?



Would you acknowledge it even if TB listed any?
 
Girth
+2
#63
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

There are chiefs and there are Indians .

If T-Bones was not American, I would swear he was Wab Kinew, posting under an alias.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#64
24 Australians arrested for deliberately setting fires this season

Quote:

Two dozen Australians in the state of New South Wales have been arrested since early November for intentionally setting fires as record-large blazes continue to burn across the country.
There have been 24 people charged with deliberately setting fires among 183 facing legal action in the state, according to the New South Wales Police Force.
In addition to those facing the most serious charges of starting fires intentionally, authorities said another 53 people are facing legal action for not complying with the state's fire ban and 47 people have faced legal action for discarding a lit cigarette or match on land.
Starting a bushfire intentionally and being reckless in causing its spread can result in up to 21 years in prison, authorities said. ………...More

 
taxslave
+2
#65
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

24 Australians arrested for deliberately setting fires this season

One of the fire fighter sites quotes 180+ throughout the country. Not all were deliberate as it seems to include tossing a lit cigarette out the window and kids playing with fire. Haven't seen a good breakdown between definite arson, acts of stupidity and accidental.
 
AnnaEmber
+2
#66
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

We ARE apes, you gormless goit.

The apes are orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees and humans.


Similarly, wolves and foxes are canines and lions and tigers are felines.

Still can'
t get it through your thick head, H. Sapiens is not H. Africanus, H. Australopithecus, H. Neanderthalensis, H. Erectus, etc. Sapiens have been around since about 200K years ago and were only inhabiting Europe since about 45K years ago. But have occupied Australia for about 65K years.
Go back to school, kid.
 
AnnaEmber
+1
#67
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post


Native American women, at least in my experience, love tall White men, with Northern European features. I think it may be because they associate us with money and power, but they love having sex with us.

hahaha Oh, is that what we like? Tell me more of our likes since you apparently claim to be an expert on us..
 
taxslave
+3
#68
It would appear you have been liking the wrong bodies all this time. If only you knew sooner.
 
AnnaEmber
+2
#69
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

I certainly can.

By the way, what great achievements have your people come up with, other than totem poles, wigwams and mouth slapping? Anything actually worthwhile?

The oldest form of democracy in North Am, for one thing. Canoes, kayaks, bolas, rubber, cable suspension bridges, analgesics and anesthetics, abacus, etc.
 
AnnaEmber
+2
#70
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

It would appear you have been liking the wrong bodies all this time. If only you knew sooner.

If I'd only have known earlier ......
 
pgs
+2
#71
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaEmber View Post

If I'd only have known earlier ......

Apparently you did .
 
Blackleaf
+1
#72
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaEmber View Post

Still can'
t get it through your thick head, H. Sapiens is not H. Africanus, H. Australopithecus, H. Neanderthalensis, H. Erectus, etc. Sapiens have been around since about 200K years ago and were only inhabiting Europe since about 45K years ago. But have occupied Australia for about 65K years.
Go back to school, kid.

New fossils suggest human ancestors evolved in Europe, not Africa
https://www.google.com/amp/s/bigthin...urope.amp.html
 
Blackleaf
+1
#73
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaEmber View Post

The oldest form of democracy in North Am, for one thing. Canoes, kayaks, bolas, rubber, cable suspension bridges, analgesics and anesthetics, abacus, etc.

The oldest known canoe dates from between 8200BC and 7600BC... in the Netherlands

Rubber is natural.

The first suspension bridges were built in Tibet.

Anaesthetics were used in Mesopotamia thousands of years ago.

The abacus was invented circa 2500BC by the Sumerians.

Other than that, though, your post is spot on.
 
petros
+3
#74
Abacus is Chinese, rubber is South American, canoe is a style of boat found all over, anesthetics in various forms are found globally, the first cable suspension bridge was made in 1930 by French engineers.
 
AnnaEmber
#75
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Apparently you did .

(shrugs) Looks like you are rarely correct.
 
AnnaEmber
#76
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

New fossils suggest human ancestors evolved in Europe, not Africa
https://www.google.com/amp/s/bigthin...urope.amp.html

Ok, I give up, you are an H. erectus. The rest of us are either H. spaines or a mix of H. sapiens and H. neanderthalensis. Have it your way.
 
AnnaEmber
+1
#77
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The oldest known canoe dates from between 8200BC and 7600BC... in the Netherlands

Rubber is natural.

The first suspension bridges were built in Tibet.

Anaesthetics were used in Mesopotamia thousands of years ago.

The abacus was invented circa 2500BC by the Sumerians.

Other than that, though, your post is spot on.

So you say. I guess it has b=never occurred to you that things can be invented by more than one person in separate places. But then I am not surprised, you seem to be quite limited in thought.
 
spaminator
#78
BUSHFIRE NUDES: Instagram deactivates model's account after she sold fundraising naked snaps
Eddie Chau
Published:
January 7, 2020
Updated:
January 7, 2020 6:00 AM EST
Kaylen Ward. (Instagram)
Instagram has deactivated the account of an American model after she raised more than $700,000 for victims of the Australian bushfires by selling naked snapshots of herself.
On Jan. 3, 20-year-old model/influencer Kaylen Ward — who is known online as The Naked Philanthropist — stated on social media that she will send nude photos of herself to every person who donated at least $10 to any fundraiser that helped the ongoing relief for the bushfires down under.
Among the organizations listed included: Australian Red Cross, Salvation Army, Australian Lions Foundation and WWF Australia to name a few.
According to the Daily Mail, Ward wanted to pitch in after seeing the devastation the fires have caused in Australia. She thought her skin-baring pictures would be the best — and likely fastest — way to raise funds.
The Daily Mail reported Ward received hundreds of messages on Instagram and Twitter from people with receipts to show their donations. Ward’s post went viral which led to Instagram deactivating her account.
She subsequently started a second account but that was also later shut down.
Ward vented her frustration via Twitter.
My IG got deactivated, my family disowned me, and the guy I like won’t talk to me all because of that tweet. But **** it, save the koalas.
— THE NAKED PHILANTHROPIST (@lilearthangelk) January 5, 2020
“My IG got deactivated, my family disowned me, and the guy I like won’t talk to all because of that tweet but f— it, save the koalas,” she wrote.
Despite her banishment from Instagram, Ward raised $700,000 for her causes.
An estimated $700K has been raised for the Australian Bush Fires in response to my tweet….
is this real life?
— THE NAKED PHILANTHROPIST (@lilearthangelk) January 6, 2020
“An estimated $700K has been raised for the Australian Bush Fires in response to my tweet…. is this real life?” she tweeted.

http://twitter.com/lilearthangelk/st...84066755317761
http://dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...activated.html
http://torontosun.com/news/world/bus...ng-naked-snaps
 
Blackleaf
#79
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaEmber View Post

So you say. I guess it has b=never occurred to you that things can be invented by more than one person in separate places. But then I am not surprised, you seem to be quite limited in thought.

Ever heard of Dunlop? He was a Brit.
 
taxslave
+1
#80
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Ever heard of Dunlop? He was a Brit.

Is that the guy whose wife dun went and lopped it off of him?
 
Blackleaf
#81
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Is that the guy whose wife dun went and lopped it off of him?

Headquartered in Birmingham:


 
Blackleaf
+1
#82
Stop getting all Biblical about the bushfires

Angry summers are nothing new in Australia.

Nick Cater
Columnist
Spiked

10th January 2020



Since Hollywood is supposed to inject drama into our lives, we can hardly complain about the hyper-dramatised version of world affairs presented from the stage of this week’s Golden Globes.

Australia’s bushfires were perfectly timed to feed the industry’s voracious appetite for suspense, emotion and existential threats from unnatural forces.

Cate Blanchett paid tribute to volunteer firefighters ‘battling the climate disaster’ in her home country. ‘When one country faces a climate disaster, we all face a climate disaster, so we’re in it together’, she said.

Events in the Middle East were seamlessly woven into the narrative. ‘We see a country on the brink of war, the United States of America… and the continent of Australia on fire’, said Patricia Arquette. ‘While I love my kids so much, I beg of us all to give them a better world.’

The elevation of this year’s bushfire tragedy as Hollywood’s cause du jour is not without material benefit. Phoebe Waller-Bridge announced she would auction her Globes tuxedo to raise funds for bushfire relief. Millions of dollars have been pledged in charitable assistance from the stars themselves, tens of millions from corporate philanthropists, and untold millions through social-media channels they have promoted.

Yet Hollywood’s romantic presentation of the bushfires as a parable of human folly is about as faithful to reality as Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio’s performance on the bow of the Titanic.

Rather, it is a product of the cultural pessimism that has driven Hollywood since the arrival of the anthropogenic disaster movie in the 1970s.

The sharp change in the prevailing wind is evident in the contrast between Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and Earthquake (1974). Butch Cassidy (Paul Newman) is a loveable outlaw in a frontier state, blessed with unlimited opportunities for redemption. Stewart Graff (Charlton Heston) in Earthquake is a shame-faced engineer crawling through the wreckage of Los Angeles, encountering nature’s revenge against a species that has been too clever by half. ‘For the first time in my life, I’m ashamed of my profession’, he confesses.

Were Bushfire to become a movie, it would tell the story of nature’s revenge on Australia, once regarded as an idyll occupied by noble savages living innocent lives in harmony with Mother Earth.

The arrival of modernity aboard the First Fleet in 1788 triggered a perceived outbreak of human rapaciousness that continues to this day, based on the assumption that humankind could plunder nature’s bounty with impunity.

Since Australians are commonly believed to have the second-largest carbon footprint on the planet, a claim that is both inaccurate and misleading, nature’s fury is understandable under the circumstances.

There are not enough waterbombers in the world to rescue the smug and greedy Aussies from this one. Repentance is the only path to salvation.

If the best way to reduce the bushfire threat is to end global consumption of fossil fuels, Australians will be at the mercy of many more angry summers to come. There would be little they could do to help themselves. Even if Australia cut all its emissions, they amount to a share of the global total of little more than one per cent.

Besides, the portrayal of bushfires in Australia as a byproduct of modernity hardly stands scrutiny. The native eucalyptus trees, rich in inflammable oil and shedding large volumes of dry bark, have achieved an evolutionary advantage through their ability to facilitate and survive fires.

Aboriginal people used fire as a hunting weapon. Early settlers to Australia were warned to be wary of bushfires, ‘one of the most remarkable circumstances peculiar to the Country’, as the Sydney Times reported in 1837.

‘Seldom a night passes, but the horizon is illuminated by the tremendous fires which rage in every direction of the compass, and blaze in a greater or less degree according to the nature and thickness of the bush, and the degree of wind blowing’, the newspaper reported, in an account that could be recycled to describe conditions in much of south-eastern Australia this summer.


Aboriginal people used fire as a hunting weapon

‘If any remedial measure can be suggested by any Reader of ours’, the article optimistically concludes, ‘we shall be thankful for the favour of hearing from him’.

Angry summers once united Australians in a battle that pitted human ingenuity and courage against a common enemy. The burden fell principally on communities rather than governments, with more than 180,000 volunteer firefighters serving in little platoons across the country.

Operations were coordinated in each of the six states and two territories, rather than from Canberra, a division of responsibility both constitutionally and logistically sound.

Today this pragmatic, bottom-up approach to fighting bushfires, evolving over more than 200 years of European settlement, is contested. The challenge is intellectual, stemming from the conviction that the complexity of bushfires can be reduced to a single grand theory that will inform the application of a grand solution. Proponents argue that the federal prime minister should take charge of this crisis, for the solution is national and international, not local.

Inevitably, bushfire-management policy has been engulfed by the phenomenon we might call the politicisation of almost everything. It has descended into an unseemly, sniping public argument over academic theory where pragmatism was once the order of the day.

Black and white judgements have been made where nuance was once demanded. Both sides attempt to arm themselves with silver bullets. Each side argues its case on terms incomprehensible to its opponents. Positions harden, false motives are attributed, moral virtue is claimed and the country is at loggerheads.

An early casualty of this fractious debate was the prime minister, Scott Morrison, denting the authority he has enjoyed since winning an election against the bookie’s odds last May.

The trap was set early by the climate-explains-everything movement. Australia was dragging its heels on climate-change action, it declared, and Morrison was heedlessly, and probably malevolently, steering the nation towards disaster.

That narrative was palpably false. Australia is one of a handful of nations to exceed its Kyoto emissions-reduction targets, and will probably beat its Paris targets as well.

The carbon footprint of the average Australian has shrunk by a third since 2005 and the carbon intensity of the economy has fallen by a quarter, a record far better than comparable developed nations like Canada.

Yet the case against Morrison was pursued to the point of exhaustion on both social and traditional media, which, blinded by confirmation bias, insist on portraying him as the dolt they would like him to be, unconcerned by either climate science or bushfire relief.

Never mind he has mobilised Australia’s reserve defence forces to assist with evacuation and the delivery of supplies to isolated fire-affected settlements. One journalist reproached him on Twitter for arriving to meet firefighters without water or snacks to share from his pocket.

As a committed Christian, he is criticised for offering not just thoughts but also prayers by those who find religion distasteful.

Damned if he does tour ravaged communities, damned if he doesn’t, Morrison’s real crime is to be a prime minister from the tradition of Australia’s pragmatic centre-right in an era when feelings prevail.

Nick Cater is executive director of the Menzies Research Centre and a columnist for the Australian.

https://www.spiked-online.com/2020/0...the-bushfires/
 
spaminator
#83
'World's hottest grandmother' selling sexy snaps to fundraise for Australian wildfire relief
Eddie Chau
Published:
January 10, 2020
Updated:
January 10, 2020 5:38 PM EST
'World's Hottest Grandma' Gina Stewart is raising funds for Australian wildfire relief. (Instagram)
The woman dubbed the “world’s hottest grandmother” is doing her part to raise funds to help battle the ongoing firefighting efforts in her native Australia by taking advantage of what she knows best.
Her sexy self.
This past Wednesday, 49-year-old Gina Stewart stated on Instagram that she’ll be sending out free subscriptions to her OnlyFans account – a social media site where people subscribe to raunchy content – to anyone who donates at least $10 to a number of fundraisers for the Australian bushfire relief.
View this post on Instagram
❤️ Free Content! ❤️ Let’s make a difference and support the Bushfire charities in Australia .I’m sending out a free subscription to my Premium Onlyfans account to every person who donates at least $10 to any one of these fundraisers for the wildfires in Australia. For a List of charities included in this post . Every donation gets the free link to join my premium content from me to your DM. You must send me confirmation , screenshot that you donated to my Direct messages , thank you for your support in advance , Please Repost and share , much love Gina 💕 Also go to my Twitter for information , charities lists, swipe up link in my stories. #AustraliaOnFire #australiafires #bushfiresaustralia
A post shared by Gina Stewart (@worldshottestgrandma) on Jan 8, 2020 at 5:31am PST
Organizations in Stewart’s list included: Australian Red Cross Blood Service, the Salvation Army and WWF Australia to name a few.
“Every donation gets the free link to join my premium content from me to your DM (direct messages),” Stewart wrote on Instagram.
Story continues below
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Stewart told the U.K. Sun: “It’s the least I can do.”
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“My brother is an actor down in Sydney, he’s been working every day as a volunteer firefighter,” she said. “His house has been really close to the firefront – so he’s literally fighting for his community.”
What a difference a day can make in fundraising. In a Thursday Instagram post, Stewart said “thousands of dollars” has been raised so far from her fans.
“So much love and gratitude to all of you who are helping with your amazing kindness and generous donations,” the mother of four and grandmother of one said. “We are making a difference and that’s what it’s all about, mostly to the wildlife charities in the form of thousands of dollars that is pouring in all night and all day as direct donations.
“So thank you all kindly from the bottom of my heart, it’s an overwhelming response.”
Stewart gained fame after competing in Maxim’s Finest Australia contest in 2018 and posting photos that left nothing to the imagination on social media.
Other Instagram models have utilized their sexuality to fundraise for firefighting efforts.
Last week, 20-year-old model Kaylen Ward, a.k.a. The Naked Philanthropist, said she will send explicit photos of herself to anyone who donated to a fundraiser. Her nude fundraising efforts led to her Instagram account being suspended while raising more than $700,000 in the process.

http://thesun.co.uk/news/10696412/wo...ustralia-fires
http://torontosun.com/news/world/wor...ildfire-relief
 
Blackleaf
#84
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

No it's not... do you pay attention at all?

It is.
 
Serryah
+1
#85
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

It is.


You're especially Blissful today, Blackie. Thank Gods others in the UK are smarter.
 
Girth
#86
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaEmber View Post

hahaha Oh, is that what we like? Tell me more of our likes since you apparently claim to be an expert on us..

Not saying all Native women do, but based on my experiences the level of interracial breeding between Whites and Natives is high. In Winnipeg, native girls obviously liked native men, but White men were not too far behind. I rarely ever saw Natives hook up with Asians, and rarely with Africans.

Most Native girls I met told me African men expected sex, and were disrespectful to them. I have as always respectful to Native Women. I really enjoyed their tanned skin, and level of openness they displayed. Most were fairly strong and independent, which is quite the contrast to the Filipina woman I dated.
Last edited by Girth; Jan 12th, 2020 at 02:09 AM..
 
B00Mer
+5
#87  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

Not saying all Native women do, but based on my experiences the level of interracial breeding between Whites and Natives is high. In Winnipeg, native girls obviously liked native men, but White men were not too far behind. I rarely ever saw Natives hook up with Asians, and rarely with Africans.
Most Native girls I met told me African men expected sex, and were disrespectful to them. I have as always respectful to Native Women. I really enjoyed their tanned skin, and level of openness they displayed. Most were fairly strong and independent, which is quite the contrast to the Filipina woman I dated.

You're just a regular United Nations between the sheets.
 
Girth
#88
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

You're just a regular United Nations between the sheets.

Women are like ice cream. Having vanilla over and over became boring. I like to try multiple flavours. I had an East Indian girl twice. We came home from the pub in Edmonton, and she took me to her bedroom, played Bollywood music, and "played" with me for the entire night. If you have never been with an East Indian women, I highly recommend you try it once.

I wish I had seen her more, but I was working 24/10 shifts north of Fort McMurray at the time.

Regardless of background, Women are pretty much the same. Progressives and SJWs will try to impress them with their politically correct, non-binary spiel. However, after a couple of drinks, they toss them aside and desire a rugged looking Alpha Male, who is not a pussy.
Last edited by Girth; Jan 12th, 2020 at 03:07 AM..
 
Blackleaf
#89
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

You're especially Blissful today, Blackie.

Well I've only just got up, even though it's nearly 4pm.

It's a bit weird seeing it start to get dark out there when I've only just got up.
 
AnnaEmber
+1
#90
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

Women are like ice cream. Having vanilla over and over became boring. I like to try multiple flavours. I had an East Indian girl twice. We came home from the pub in Edmonton, and she took me to her bedroom, played Bollywood music, and "played" with me for the entire night. If you have never been with an East Indian women, I highly recommend you try it once.

I wish I had seen her more, but I was working 24/10 shifts north of Fort McMurray at the time.

Regardless of background, Women are pretty much the same. Progressives and SJWs will try to impress them with their politically correct, non-binary spiel. However, after a couple of drinks, they toss them aside and desire a rugged looking Alpha Male, who is not a pussy.

Or at least the loose, unprincipled women you prefer.