Elon Musk acted like a jerk, and Tesla stock paid the price


MHz
#121
Meth lab level filtration will cure that 'little problem', . . . perhaps. Splitting water with electricity creates Browns Gas, hho so when it ignites the explosion rate creates a 'crack' like lightening rather than a 'boom' like gunpowder. You could store it but why would you want to, it is like cooking supper a week before it is mealtime. A lot can happen to spoil the meal in a week.
12V @50amps and some 316 SS plates in a water bath that has lots of baking soda dissolved so it flows more current (safer for home use than battery acid)

Last edited by MHz; Jul 28th, 2019 at 10:28 AM..
 
Gilgamesh
#122
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

He didnt take his lithium

Tesla Inc. Chief Executive Elon Musk held a long, odd earnings conference call Wednesday in which he insulted analysts, the media, federal regulators and people who died behind the wheel of his cars, and then told anyone concerned about volatility not to invest in his company.

Unsurprisingly, volatility ensued, as Tesla TSLA, -7.45% shares dropped quickly during an increasingly bizarre call with the very analysts and media whom Musk attacked.

Tesla on Wednesday disclosed the largest quarterly loss in the history of a company known far and wide for losing vast sums of money, with a net loss of almost $785 million. The numbers still managed to beat expectations that have been repeatedly lowered for more than a year, which led Musk to take a victory lap on Twitter after losing more than three quarters of a billion dollars in three months.

It only got weirder from there. In his conference-call introduction, Musk confused per-week and per-day production figures, described a “super complicated” robot Tesla designed and built before realizing it could not perform its unnecessary function, then mentioned offhandedly that he planned to restructure the company this month — a disclosure he never revisited to provide more information.

When the question-and-answer session started, Musk turned vitriolic, and not even his fellow executives were safe. After Chief Financial Officer Deepak Ahuja referred to Tesla as “best in class” for batteries while responding to an analyst query, he was interrupted by Musk.

“The best. It is not a class,” Musk interjected.

“Yes, we’re the best. Sorry,” Ahuja replied.

“The best in a class of one,” Musk made sure to point out.

Don’t miss: Elon Musk says robot software will make Tesla worth as much as Apple

Soon, Musk turned his ire toward the financial analysts who were asking the questions. When Bernstein analyst Toni Sacconaghi attempted to ask about capital-expenditure spending and the money needed, Musk cut him off by yelling “Next!” When RBC Capital Markets analyst Joseph Spak then asked how many people with Model 3 reservations were actually taking delivery of their cars, Musk declined to answer any more “boring,” “dry” questions.

“You’re killing me,” he said.

Instead, Musk turned to Galileo Russell, a YouTuber whom Musk allowed to ask a question after an online campaign to appear on the earnings call. Instead of a single question, however, Musk allowed Russell to ask roughly a dozen questions, few with much relation to the quarter in question or near-term Tesla performance. Russell instead focused on long-term goals, leading to an entertaining interview that Musk used to air his ire.

Opinion: Tesla is a large public company, and Elon Musk must start acting like it

Russell’s first question, about Tesla’s plan for an autonomous ride-sharing network, led to a rant about the media in which Musk intimated that federal regulators are only doing their job because of misleading press coverage of drivers who have died behind the wheel of a Tesla while using its inappropriately named “Autopilot” driver-assistance technology. Musk went so far as to suggest that reporters will cause more deaths by covering the deaths of people who are using this new technology that Musk and others believe will soon be widespread.

“If the press is hounding the regulators, and the public is living under the misapprehension that autonomy is less safe because of misleading press, then this is where I find the challenge predicting it to be very difficult,” Musk said. “And, yeah, it’s really incredibly irresponsible of any journalists with integrity to write an article that would lead people to believe that autonomy is less safe. Because people might actually turn it off, and then die.”

When asked again about Autopilot later in the call, he again attacked the media, which Tesla admittedly relies on for free marketing, and then said the blame lies with his customers — the very people who determine Tesla’s success.

“When there is a serious accident, almost always — in fact, maybe always — the case is that it is an experienced user, and the issue is more one of complacency. Like, they get too used to it,” Musk said. “That tends to be more of an issue. It is not a lack of understanding of what Autopilot can do. It’s actually thinking they know more about Autopilot than they do, like quite a significant understanding of it.”


What's going to happen inside your car once you don't have to drive

By the time Baird analyst Ben Kallo took the phone more than an hour into the call, the apprehension was thick. Kallo took more time with an introduction to his question, which gave reasoning for why Musk should answer it and not be angry at him, than actually asking the question.

Musk did not really answer his question, instead complaining about leaks to the media and his own investors.

“I think that if people are concerned about volatility, they should definitely not buy our stock,” Musk said. “I’m not here to convince you to buy our stock. Do not buy it if volatility is scary.”

Opinion: Tesla’s woes are easy to fix—if Elon Musk’s ego allows it

Related: Why I’ll keep shorting Tesla’s stock, and not just because of that earnings call

If volatility is scary, Tesla’s after-hours performance could double as another sequel to “Nightmare on Elm Street.” Shares originally gained after the numbers hit, but soon fell to a decline of about 1%. After Musk was rude to two analysts in a row, ignoring questions that investors actually cared about, that decline suddenly steepened to a loss of about 5%. If that drop holds into Thursday’s trading session, it would add to Tesla’s 3.3% decline so far this year, which is greater than a 1.4% decline for the S&P 500 index SPX, -0.22% in 2018.

SHARE
212

Home
Industries
Automobiles
MarketWatch First Take
Opinion: Elon Musk acted like a jerk, and Tesla stock paid the price
By Jeremy C. Owens
Published: May 3, 2018 12:31 p.m. ET

SHARE
212

Opinion: Tesla CEO’s performance on earnings call was bizarre and contentious, but it’s investors who are paying

Bloomberg News/Landov
”If people are concerned about volatility, they should definitely not buy our stock,” Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk said Wednesday.
Tesla Inc. Chief Executive Elon Musk held a long, odd earnings conference call Wednesday in which he insulted analysts, the media, federal regulators and people who died behind the wheel of his cars, and then told anyone concerned about volatility not to invest in his company.

Unsurprisingly, volatility ensued, as Tesla TSLA, -6.76% shares dropped quickly during an increasingly bizarre call with the very analysts and media whom Musk attacked.


Tesla on Wednesday disclosed the largest quarterly loss in the history of a company known far and wide for losing vast sums of money, with a net loss of almost $785 million. The numbers still managed to beat expectations that have been repeatedly lowered for more than a year, which led Musk to take a victory lap on Twitter after losing more than three quarters of a billion dollars in three months.


It only got weirder from there. In his conference-call introduction, Musk confused per-week and per-day production figures, described a “super complicated” robot Tesla designed and built before realizing it could not perform its unnecessary function, then mentioned offhandedly that he planned to restructure the company this month — a disclosure he never revisited to provide more information.

When the question-and-answer session started, Musk turned vitriolic, and not even his fellow executives were safe. After Chief Financial Officer Deepak Ahuja referred to Tesla as “best in class” for batteries while responding to an analyst query, he was interrupted by Musk.

“The best. It is not a class,” Musk interjected.

“Yes, we’re the best. Sorry,” Ahuja replied.

“The best in a class of one,” Musk made sure to point out.

Don’t miss: Elon Musk says robot software will make Tesla worth as much as Apple

Soon, Musk turned his ire toward the financial analysts who were asking the questions. When Bernstein analyst Toni Sacconaghi attempted to ask about capital-expenditure spending and the money needed, Musk cut him off by yelling “Next!” When RBC Capital Markets analyst Joseph Spak then asked how many people with Model 3 reservations were actually taking delivery of their cars, Musk declined to answer any more “boring,” “dry” questions.

“You’re killing me,” he said.


Advertisement
Instead, Musk turned to Galileo Russell, a YouTuber whom Musk allowed to ask a question after an online campaign to appear on the earnings call. Instead of a single question, however, Musk allowed Russell to ask roughly a dozen questions, few with much relation to the quarter in question or near-term Tesla performance. Russell instead focused on long-term goals, leading to an entertaining interview that Musk used to air his ire.

Opinion: Tesla is a large public company, and Elon Musk must start acting like it

Russell’s first question, about Tesla’s plan for an autonomous ride-sharing network, led to a rant about the media in which Musk intimated that federal regulators are only doing their job because of misleading press coverage of drivers who have died behind the wheel of a Tesla while using its inappropriately named “Autopilot” driver-assistance technology. Musk went so far as to suggest that reporters will cause more deaths by covering the deaths of people who are using this new technology that Musk and others believe will soon be widespread.

“If the press is hounding the regulators, and the public is living under the misapprehension that autonomy is less safe because of misleading press, then this is where I find the challenge predicting it to be very difficult,” Musk said. “And, yeah, it’s really incredibly irresponsible of any journalists with integrity to write an article that would lead people to believe that autonomy is less safe. Because people might actually turn it off, and then die.”


Advertisement
When asked again about Autopilot later in the call, he again attacked the media, which Tesla admittedly relies on for free marketing, and then said the blame lies with his customers — the very people who determine Tesla’s success.

“When there is a serious accident, almost always — in fact, maybe always — the case is that it is an experienced user, and the issue is more one of complacency. Like, they get too used to it,” Musk said. “That tends to be more of an issue. It is not a lack of understanding of what Autopilot can do. It’s actually thinking they know more about Autopilot than they do, like quite a significant understanding of it.”


What's going to happen inside your car once you don't have to drive

By the time Baird analyst Ben Kallo took the phone more than an hour into the call, the apprehension was thick. Kallo took more time with an introduction to his question, which gave reasoning for why Musk should answer it and not be angry at him, than actually asking the question.

Musk did not really answer his question, instead complaining about leaks to the media and his own investors.


Advertisement
“I think that if people are concerned about volatility, they should definitely not buy our stock,” Musk said. “I’m not here to convince you to buy our stock. Do not buy it if volatility is scary.”

Opinion: Tesla’s woes are easy to fix—if Elon Musk’s ego allows it

Related: Why I’ll keep shorting Tesla’s stock, and not just because of that earnings call

If volatility is scary, Tesla’s after-hours performance could double as another sequel to “Nightmare on Elm Street.” Shares originally gained after the numbers hit, but soon fell to a decline of about 1%. After Musk was rude to two analysts in a row, ignoring questions that investors actually cared about, that decline suddenly steepened to a loss of about 5%. If that drop holds into Thursday’s trading session, it would add to Tesla’s 3.3% decline so far this year, which is greater than a 1.4% decline for the S&P 500 index SPX, -0.24% in 2018.

Time
Tesla Inc.
Jul 17
Sep 17
Nov 17
Jan 18
Mar 18
May 18
US:TSLA$250$300$350$400$200
A CEO should have to answer to someone when he or she insults the company’s investors, large banks’ analysts and media members in a series of screeds that seems to have an effect on the stock price. That would be the board of directors, but Tesla barely has one: Musk is chairman and has stocked the board with supporters, including his own brother.

Tesla has obvious problems. Executives like chip expert Jim Keller are fleeing, factory workers are attempting to organize as reports suggest an unsafe workplace, and Musk continues to add more pet projects to a company that can’t seem to get up to speed on the project he added years ago, the Model 3. Musk’s increasingly bizarre and combative behavior is not helping.

Tesla has the chance to be a world-changing and profitable company that pushes us to a more sustainable and cleaner future, mostly because of Elon Musk. It also has the chance to be an unmitigated disaster that collapses under the weight of outlandish ambitions and debt, mostly because of Elon Musk. Performances like Tuesday’s conference call only push the needle toward the latter result.

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/el...ice-2018-05-02

And now Musk has proven correct. As he predicted, Tesla stock has recoveted and is now booming to new heights as production soars everywhere; a huge new Chinese factory comes on line etc..

Sux 2BU
 
captain morgan
+2
#123
$0 EPS, $0 dividend and $0 P/E ratio.


The price of this stock is a fantasy at best. The company is desperately seeking more cash, still haven't filled all the orders that were organized via pre-payment and have foolishly made available on a deposit only basis, the 1/2 ton truck that exists only as a prototype.



That said, this won't be the first company to have an aggressive (stock) promotions program that ends up in the where-are-they-now file in a few years
 
Hoid
#124
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

$0 EPS, $0 dividend and $0 P/E ratio.

If EPS = 0 then the P/E ratio is also 0
you don't need to put it in as an "and"
 
captain morgan
+1
#125
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

If EPS = 0 then the P/E ratio is also 0
you don't need to put it in as an "and"


You would be correct on both accounts, but any analyst of substance will consider EPS and P/E ratio.


... Tesla offers neither
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#126
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

The price of this stock is a fantasy at best.

To be fair, that's what casinos sell.
 
taxslave
+1
#127
And what is the stock market but a giant casino?
 
captain morgan
+2
#128
As per the casino reference, Tesla would be the equivalent of buying a ticket for the power ball lottery as opposed to sitting at a black jack table.
 
Gilgamesh
#129
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

He didnt take his lithium

Tesla Inc. Chief Executive Elon Musk held a long, odd earnings conference call Wednesday in which he insulted analysts, the media, federal regulators and people who died behind the wheel of his cars, and then told anyone concerned about volatility not to invest in his company.

Unsurprisingly, volatility ensued, as Tesla TSLA, -7.45% shares dropped quickly during an increasingly bizarre call with the very analysts and media whom Musk attacked.

Tesla on Wednesday disclosed the largest quarterly loss in the history of a company known far and wide for losing vast sums of money, with a net loss of almost $785 million. The numbers still managed to beat expectations that have been repeatedly lowered for more than a year, which led Musk to take a victory lap on Twitter after losing more than three quarters of a billion dollars in three months.

It only got weirder from there. In his conference-call introduction, Musk confused per-week and per-day production figures, described a “super complicated” robot Tesla designed and built before realizing it could not perform its unnecessary function, then mentioned offhandedly that he planned to restructure the company this month — a disclosure he never revisited to provide more information.

When the question-and-answer session started, Musk turned vitriolic, and not even his fellow executives were safe. After Chief Financial Officer Deepak Ahuja referred to Tesla as “best in class” for batteries while responding to an analyst query, he was interrupted by Musk.

“The best. It is not a class,” Musk interjected.

“Yes, we’re the best. Sorry,” Ahuja replied.

“The best in a class of one,” Musk made sure to point out.

Don’t miss: Elon Musk says robot software will make Tesla worth as much as Apple

Soon, Musk turned his ire toward the financial analysts who were asking the questions. When Bernstein analyst Toni Sacconaghi attempted to ask about capital-expenditure spending and the money needed, Musk cut him off by yelling “Next!” When RBC Capital Markets analyst Joseph Spak then asked how many people with Model 3 reservations were actually taking delivery of their cars, Musk declined to answer any more “boring,” “dry” questions.

“You’re killing me,” he said.

Instead, Musk turned to Galileo Russell, a YouTuber whom Musk allowed to ask a question after an online campaign to appear on the earnings call. Instead of a single question, however, Musk allowed Russell to ask roughly a dozen questions, few with much relation to the quarter in question or near-term Tesla performance. Russell instead focused on long-term goals, leading to an entertaining interview that Musk used to air his ire.

Opinion: Tesla is a large public company, and Elon Musk must start acting like it

Russell’s first question, about Tesla’s plan for an autonomous ride-sharing network, led to a rant about the media in which Musk intimated that federal regulators are only doing their job because of misleading press coverage of drivers who have died behind the wheel of a Tesla while using its inappropriately named “Autopilot” driver-assistance technology. Musk went so far as to suggest that reporters will cause more deaths by covering the deaths of people who are using this new technology that Musk and others believe will soon be widespread.

“If the press is hounding the regulators, and the public is living under the misapprehension that autonomy is less safe because of misleading press, then this is where I find the challenge predicting it to be very difficult,” Musk said. “And, yeah, it’s really incredibly irresponsible of any journalists with integrity to write an article that would lead people to believe that autonomy is less safe. Because people might actually turn it off, and then die.”

When asked again about Autopilot later in the call, he again attacked the media, which Tesla admittedly relies on for free marketing, and then said the blame lies with his customers — the very people who determine Tesla’s success.

“When there is a serious accident, almost always — in fact, maybe always — the case is that it is an experienced user, and the issue is more one of complacency. Like, they get too used to it,” Musk said. “That tends to be more of an issue. It is not a lack of understanding of what Autopilot can do. It’s actually thinking they know more about Autopilot than they do, like quite a significant understanding of it.”


What's going to happen inside your car once you don't have to drive

By the time Baird analyst Ben Kallo took the phone more than an hour into the call, the apprehension was thick. Kallo took more time with an introduction to his question, which gave reasoning for why Musk should answer it and not be angry at him, than actually asking the question.

Musk did not really answer his question, instead complaining about leaks to the media and his own investors.

“I think that if people are concerned about volatility, they should definitely not buy our stock,” Musk said. “I’m not here to convince you to buy our stock. Do not buy it if volatility is scary.”

Opinion: Tesla’s woes are easy to fix—if Elon Musk’s ego allows it

Related: Why I’ll keep shorting Tesla’s stock, and not just because of that earnings call

If volatility is scary, Tesla’s after-hours performance could double as another sequel to “Nightmare on Elm Street.” Shares originally gained after the numbers hit, but soon fell to a decline of about 1%. After Musk was rude to two analysts in a row, ignoring questions that investors actually cared about, that decline suddenly steepened to a loss of about 5%. If that drop holds into Thursday’s trading session, it would add to Tesla’s 3.3% decline so far this year, which is greater than a 1.4% decline for the S&P 500 index SPX, -0.22% in 2018.

SHARE
212

Home
Industries
Automobiles
MarketWatch First Take
Opinion: Elon Musk acted like a jerk, and Tesla stock paid the price
By Jeremy C. Owens
Published: May 3, 2018 12:31 p.m. ET

SHARE
212

Opinion: Tesla CEO’s performance on earnings call was bizarre and contentious, but it’s investors who are paying

Bloomberg News/Landov
”If people are concerned about volatility, they should definitely not buy our stock,” Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk said Wednesday.
Tesla Inc. Chief Executive Elon Musk held a long, odd earnings conference call Wednesday in which he insulted analysts, the media, federal regulators and people who died behind the wheel of his cars, and then told anyone concerned about volatility not to invest in his company.

Unsurprisingly, volatility ensued, as Tesla TSLA, -6.76% shares dropped quickly during an increasingly bizarre call with the very analysts and media whom Musk attacked.


Tesla on Wednesday disclosed the largest quarterly loss in the history of a company known far and wide for losing vast sums of money, with a net loss of almost $785 million. The numbers still managed to beat expectations that have been repeatedly lowered for more than a year, which led Musk to take a victory lap on Twitter after losing more than three quarters of a billion dollars in three months.


It only got weirder from there. In his conference-call introduction, Musk confused per-week and per-day production figures, described a “super complicated” robot Tesla designed and built before realizing it could not perform its unnecessary function, then mentioned offhandedly that he planned to restructure the company this month — a disclosure he never revisited to provide more information.

When the question-and-answer session started, Musk turned vitriolic, and not even his fellow executives were safe. After Chief Financial Officer Deepak Ahuja referred to Tesla as “best in class” for batteries while responding to an analyst query, he was interrupted by Musk.

“The best. It is not a class,” Musk interjected.

“Yes, we’re the best. Sorry,” Ahuja replied.

“The best in a class of one,” Musk made sure to point out.

Don’t miss: Elon Musk says robot software will make Tesla worth as much as Apple

Soon, Musk turned his ire toward the financial analysts who were asking the questions. When Bernstein analyst Toni Sacconaghi attempted to ask about capital-expenditure spending and the money needed, Musk cut him off by yelling “Next!” When RBC Capital Markets analyst Joseph Spak then asked how many people with Model 3 reservations were actually taking delivery of their cars, Musk declined to answer any more “boring,” “dry” questions.

“You’re killing me,” he said.


Advertisement
Instead, Musk turned to Galileo Russell, a YouTuber whom Musk allowed to ask a question after an online campaign to appear on the earnings call. Instead of a single question, however, Musk allowed Russell to ask roughly a dozen questions, few with much relation to the quarter in question or near-term Tesla performance. Russell instead focused on long-term goals, leading to an entertaining interview that Musk used to air his ire.

Opinion: Tesla is a large public company, and Elon Musk must start acting like it

Russell’s first question, about Tesla’s plan for an autonomous ride-sharing network, led to a rant about the media in which Musk intimated that federal regulators are only doing their job because of misleading press coverage of drivers who have died behind the wheel of a Tesla while using its inappropriately named “Autopilot” driver-assistance technology. Musk went so far as to suggest that reporters will cause more deaths by covering the deaths of people who are using this new technology that Musk and others believe will soon be widespread.

“If the press is hounding the regulators, and the public is living under the misapprehension that autonomy is less safe because of misleading press, then this is where I find the challenge predicting it to be very difficult,” Musk said. “And, yeah, it’s really incredibly irresponsible of any journalists with integrity to write an article that would lead people to believe that autonomy is less safe. Because people might actually turn it off, and then die.”


Advertisement
When asked again about Autopilot later in the call, he again attacked the media, which Tesla admittedly relies on for free marketing, and then said the blame lies with his customers — the very people who determine Tesla’s success.

“When there is a serious accident, almost always — in fact, maybe always — the case is that it is an experienced user, and the issue is more one of complacency. Like, they get too used to it,” Musk said. “That tends to be more of an issue. It is not a lack of understanding of what Autopilot can do. It’s actually thinking they know more about Autopilot than they do, like quite a significant understanding of it.”


What's going to happen inside your car once you don't have to drive

By the time Baird analyst Ben Kallo took the phone more than an hour into the call, the apprehension was thick. Kallo took more time with an introduction to his question, which gave reasoning for why Musk should answer it and not be angry at him, than actually asking the question.

Musk did not really answer his question, instead complaining about leaks to the media and his own investors.


Advertisement
“I think that if people are concerned about volatility, they should definitely not buy our stock,” Musk said. “I’m not here to convince you to buy our stock. Do not buy it if volatility is scary.”

Opinion: Tesla’s woes are easy to fix—if Elon Musk’s ego allows it

Related: Why I’ll keep shorting Tesla’s stock, and not just because of that earnings call

If volatility is scary, Tesla’s after-hours performance could double as another sequel to “Nightmare on Elm Street.” Shares originally gained after the numbers hit, but soon fell to a decline of about 1%. After Musk was rude to two analysts in a row, ignoring questions that investors actually cared about, that decline suddenly steepened to a loss of about 5%. If that drop holds into Thursday’s trading session, it would add to Tesla’s 3.3% decline so far this year, which is greater than a 1.4% decline for the S&P 500 index SPX, -0.24% in 2018.

Time
Tesla Inc.
Jul 17
Sep 17
Nov 17
Jan 18
Mar 18
May 18
US:TSLA$250$300$350$400$200
A CEO should have to answer to someone when he or she insults the company’s investors, large banks’ analysts and media members in a series of screeds that seems to have an effect on the stock price. That would be the board of directors, but Tesla barely has one: Musk is chairman and has stocked the board with supporters, including his own brother.

Tesla has obvious problems. Executives like chip expert Jim Keller are fleeing, factory workers are attempting to organize as reports suggest an unsafe workplace, and Musk continues to add more pet projects to a company that can’t seem to get up to speed on the project he added years ago, the Model 3. Musk’s increasingly bizarre and combative behavior is not helping.

Tesla has the chance to be a world-changing and profitable company that pushes us to a more sustainable and cleaner future, mostly because of Elon Musk. It also has the chance to be an unmitigated disaster that collapses under the weight of outlandish ambitions and debt, mostly because of Elon Musk. Performances like Tuesday’s conference call only push the needle toward the latter result.

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/el...ice-2018-05-02

And now Musk has proven correct, business is booming,stock and sales have risen to new heights as new factories have been built.

S your point is what?
 
captain morgan
+2
#130
The point is that Tesla is dead.. After 15 years in business, they haven't turned one dime in profit and actually owe a ton of cash to those that are still waiting for delivery on these pretend products
 
Hoid
#131
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

The point is that Tesla is dead.. After 15 years in business, they haven't turned one dime in profit and actually owe a ton of cash to those that are still waiting for delivery on these pretend products

lol

Tesla has doubled in value in the last three months

they reported $143 million profit (unexpected) last quarter
 
taxslave
+1
#132
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

lol
Tesla has doubled in value in the last three months
they reported $143 million profit (unexpected) last quarter

So they can stop getting taxpayers money to produce rich mans toys?
 
Hoid
#133
you don't really know much about EV subsidies do you?

a shocker given your normally rock solid grasp of the facts.
 
Hoid
#134
Tesla Needs a Blockbuster Earnings Report on Wednesday to Avoid a Massive Selloff

https://www.ccn.com/tesla-needs-bloc...ssive-selloff/

this article is what is left of tesla bashing in the media.

now the stock is so over-valued that only a large beat can possibly save it - or some such nonsense.
 
Hoid
#135
Tsla runs all the way up to $589 prior closing.
 
Hoid
#136
$620 after hours....
 
petros
+1
#137
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Tesla Needs a Blockbuster Earnings Report on Wednesday to Avoid a Massive Selloff
https://www.ccn.com/tesla-needs-bloc...ssive-selloff/
this article is what is left of tesla bashing in the media.
now the stock is so over-valued that only a large beat can possibly save it - or some such nonsense.

Show the coaster or napkin you scratched out your math on.
 
Hoid
#138
TSLA now at $650 after hours.

I am going to go out on a limb and guess good news of some sort.
 
petros
+2
#139
Hooray for short sellers.
 
taxslave
+1
#140
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

you don't really know much about EV subsidies do you?
a shocker given your normally rock solid grasp of the facts.

Appare Much more than you do. On any subject.
 
taxslave
+1
#141
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

TSLA now at $650 after hours.
I am going to go out on a limb and guess good news of some sort.

It still doesn't put any money in your pocket unless you sell. Then you no longer own shares. Got that yet?
 
taxslave
+3
#142
Anyone besides me notice the startling similarity to Brex?
 
petros
+2
#143
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

It still doesn't put any money in your pocket unless you sell. Then you no longer own shares. Got that yet?

And lose half to taxes.
 
taxslave
+1
#144
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

And lose half to taxes.

If you put the money directly into other stocks the tax hit shouldn't be too bad.
 
petros
+3
#145
Trefis analysis shows Tesla’s (NASDAQ: TSLA) stock could potentially drop to $0 from its current levels of over $500. We outline how Tesla could end up defaulting on its roughly $13 billion in debt, a meaningful portion of which matures over the next 4 years. What’s the trigger? We first consider the case of recession or a soft economy as a trigger to lower revenues, margins and a cash crunch. Then we highlight how there are other possible triggers that could lead to a similar set of events.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/greatsp...la-stock-to-0/
 
petros
+1
#146
Elon will be dumping his buy backs very very soon.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#147
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Elon will be dumping his buy backs very very soon.

My thoughts as well, he should be investigated over it by restricting the stocks he manufactured a rise in stock prices by creating the bid process over limited stocks IMO
 
Hoid
#148
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

It still doesn't put any money in your pocket unless you sell. Then you no longer own shares. Got that yet?

why wouldn't you just use your stock portfolio to finance a line of credit?

that's what everyone else on earth does.
 
taxslave
+1
#149
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

why wouldn't you just use your stock portfolio to finance a line of credit?
that's what everyone else on earth does.

Too risky. Yes I know lots of people do it but when the stock you are using for security drops you can wind up in a serious financial crunch. Homes have been lost by reckless investing.
 
Hoid
#150
nobody mentioned reckless investing.

we were merely discussing your imagined need to actually sell stock in order to realize a gain on it.