A Sign of the Times?


Ron in Regina
#1
I'm just curious, but is this something new, or just new to where I am?







Is this a good idea? Would you plug in a Buck, and then stop into this
PetroCanada Service Station to pick up a jug of milk or a loaf of bread
or a pack of cigarettes or a lotto ticket, etc...?

Or...would you drive elsewhere to save your dollar, and then make your
incidental purchases wherever you get to fill you tire without a fee
charged for that air?

Do you think this Service Station will increase or decrease profit due to
this new Fee for air?
 
Cliffy
#2
I wouldn't pay for sex, why would I pay for air. I really hope this doesn't catch on.
 
Socrates the Greek
#3
Good day Ron, what a bad marketing idea, the next thing this station may do is have doors that lock after you enter and you will be asked to pay a buck for the use of the door function, is that demented or what? For sure not a place I will stop and do business with and now that you have brought it to my attention I am looking for this stupid units and I will boycott any service station and the oil company they represent.
 
DurkaDurka
#4
I have seen this going on for years in the Toronto area. It is not longer a value added service unfortunately.
 
darkbeaver
#5
We have these in the Irving fuel dumps good thing to because none of the twats working there no anything about serviceing vehicles. Hortons is attached to the place so on a busy day you can watch the completely helpless customers trying to figure out how to do thier tire pressure while you have coffee and mareawanna.
 
SirJosephPorter
#6
Really, who puts air in their tires these days? In all these years, I remember putting air in my tires maybe once or twice (once when I had a small puncture but was too lazy to change the tire until I got home).

These days the inner liner in the tires is so good that you don’t need to put air in them. I think this move will be a wash. I don’t see them taking in anything substantial. They will be lucky if they recover the expense of installing the coin machine.
 
DurkaDurka
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

Really, who puts air in their tires these days? In all these years, I remember putting air in my tires maybe once or twice (once when I had a small puncture but was too lazy to change the tire until I got home).

These days the inner liner in the tires is so good that you donít need to put air in them. I think this move will be a wash. I donít see them taking in anything substantial. They will be lucky if they recover the expense of installing the coin machine.

Flats do happen, Sir Joe. I see it all the time. Not every driver has run-flat tires or knows how to care for a car for that matter.

A buck for 1 minute worth of air could add up to a pretty decent profit after a while.
 
Ron in Regina
#8
Yesterday was the first time I'd ever seen such a thing. I stopped
at the compressor to top up a rear tire, on the way to going into
the Service Station for a couple of Packs of Cigarettes and a pack
of Hamburger Buns.

I didn't even notice the coin slot function until I was out of the car.
I got back in my car and drove elsewhere, and made my other
purchases where I actually put air in my tire. I stopped at that
Service Station because of the Air Compressor, and left that
same Service Station because of the new coin slot feature on
that same Air Compressor.

Not only did this PetroCanada NOT get my dollar for the air, but
they missed out on about $27 in other purchases in that one stop
by one person alone. I don't see this as a good idea either....

This is very new to where I live, but it seems not new to Toronto. Is
this idea wide spread elsewhere? What other weird signs of the
times with respect to superfluous fee's have you seen?
 
DurkaDurka
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

This is very new to where I live, but it seems not new to Toronto. Is
this idea wide spread elsewhere? What other weird signs of the
times with respect to superfluous fee's have you seen?

I suspect most independent stores haven't gone this route (if there is such a thing anymore), it's probably a new corporate policy from Petro Canada and the like.
 
darkbeaver
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

Really, who puts air in their tires these days? In all these years, I remember putting air in my tires maybe once or twice (once when I had a small puncture but was too lazy to change the tire until I got home).

These days the inner liner in the tires is so good that you donít need to put air in them. I think this move will be a wash. I donít see them taking in anything substantial. They will be lucky if they recover the expense of installing the coin machine.

Correct tire pressure is very important both with respect to vehicle stability and fuel efficiency. Illmaintained tire pressure can also result in premature wear of road components. Ambient air temperature does effect your pressure.The deal for the air units is sweet for the service station personell who no longer are responsible for coiling the hose or costly interruptions or any liability encured through damage by the twats. It's maintained by the providers.
 
EagleSmack
#11
That is common down here in the states. They USED to have money collectors to use bathrooms but a law was passed to stop that. Gas stations get you coming and going.
 
lone wolf
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

Really, who puts air in their tires these days? In all these years, I remember putting air in my tires maybe once or twice (once when I had a small puncture but was too lazy to change the tire until I got home).

These days the inner liner in the tires is so good that you donít need to put air in them. I think this move will be a wash. I donít see them taking in anything substantial. They will be lucky if they recover the expense of installing the coin machine.

And I share a road with you????
 
DurkaDurka
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

That is common down here in the states. They USED to have money collectors to use bathrooms but a law was passed to stop that. Gas stations get you coming and going.

I would hope they would wipe my arse too if I had to pay for the privilege of using their washrooms.
 
EagleSmack
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

And I share a road with you????



Better you than me.

Who puts air in their tires anymore?... That is a classic.
 
lone wolf
#15
Does anyone remember when self serve gas stations were supposed to be cheaper than the ones with the pump jockeys?
 
DurkaDurka
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

Does anyone remember when self serve gas stations were supposed to be cheaper than the ones with the pump jockeys?

Are there even full serve stations around anymore? I can't recall seeing one in years.
 
EagleSmack
#17
I am really surprised that this caught some people off guard. Every gas station I know of has a pay air pump.
 
lone wolf
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by DurkaDurka View Post

Are there even full serve stations around anymore? I can't recall seeing one in years.

There are a few up here ... but they don't check the oil or wash the windshield unless you ask.
 
lone wolf
#19


The old Pff -- ding! Is history....
 
SirJosephPorter
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

Correct tire pressure is very important both with respect to vehicle stability and fuel efficiency. Illmaintained tire pressure can also result in premature wear of road components. Ambient air temperature does effect your pressure.The deal for the air units is sweet for the service station personell who no longer are responsible for coiling the hose or costly interruptions or any liability encured through damage by the twats. It's maintained by the providers.

I will take your word for it. But I never fill air in my tires (and I suspect many people are like me). I bought the present car three years ago; I never filled air in the tires.

Just last week I had my routine maintenance, I was told that all the tires are in great shape. No uneven wear, etc. plenty of tread still left (I assume they rotate the tires during regular maintenance). In old days, when inner tube was not very efficient and air used to leak out, it was important to top up. I don’t think that has been necessary for years now. I would fill up air only for extraordinary circumstances, such as getting a puncture (or I replaced the tire with the mini and mini does not have enough air pressure).

These days inner liners are very good, have very low permeability, and usually it is not important to top up the air. I am not even sure what is the status where I live, whether they charge for air or not. To me, this is a non issue.
 
SirJosephPorter
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by DurkaDurka View Post

Are there even full serve stations around anymore? I can't recall seeing one in years.

There are many stations which have full service and self service isles. Some of the smaller stations are all full service. We have one near us, it is a small hardware store (but they do have the Home Hardware logo). He also operates gas station, and it is all full service.
 
JLM
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

I will take your word for it. But I never fill air in my tires (and I suspect many people are like me). I bought the present car three years ago; I never filled air in the tires.

Just last week I had my routine maintenance, I was told that all the tires are in great shape. No uneven wear, etc. plenty of tread still left (I assume they rotate the tires during regular maintenance). In old days, when inner tube was not very efficient and air used to leak out, it was important to top up. I donít think that has been necessary for years now. I would fill up air only for extraordinary circumstances, such as getting a puncture (or I replaced the tire with the mini and mini does not have enough air pressure).

These days inner liners are very good, have very low permeability, and usually it is not important to top up the air. I am not even sure what is the status where I live, whether they charge for air or not. To me, this is a non issue.

Regardless S.J. it's just good practice to check your tire pressure once a month, tires do occasionally lose pressure for some reason we can't always determine. And unless you instruct them to do so DO NOT assume your tires have been rotated during a routine service- they don't do it for free, and if a charge isn't shown it hasn't been done. Actually about every third service is plenty for tire rotation, otherwise you spend more on rotations than the cost of the tires.
 
darkbeaver
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

I will take your word for it. But I never fill air in my tires (and I suspect many people are like me). I bought the present car three years ago; I never filled air in the tires.

Just last week I had my routine maintenance, I was told that all the tires are in great shape. No uneven wear, etc. plenty of tread still left (I assume they rotate the tires during regular maintenance). In old days, when inner tube was not very efficient and air used to leak out, it was important to top up. I donít think that has been necessary for years now. I would fill up air only for extraordinary circumstances, such as getting a puncture (or I replaced the tire with the mini and mini does not have enough air pressure).

These days inner liners are very good, have very low permeability, and usually it is not important to top up the air. I am not even sure what is the status where I live, whether they charge for air or not. To me, this is a non issue.

So you are one of those people who sencelessly neglect routine vehicle inspections as per the handbook. How many highway fatalities will it take to get you to live up to your safe driving responsibilities, the department of transportation will decide what's an issue with respect to vehicular safety and not some Joe Who socially retarded driving rebel. I'v heard some pretty rediculous stories from safety shirkers before but you Sir are positively antisocial.
 
L Gilbert
#24
Is the air that bad in cities that you have stops along the way to breathe?
 
SirJosephPorter
#25
So you are one of those people who sencelessly neglect routine vehicle inspections as per the handbook.

Now where did you get that, darkbeaver? I always carry out the routine inspections and maintenance as recommended. And the dealership makes it easy for me. When my car is due for inspection, they give me a call and I book an appointment (and I assume they do what needs to be done). Regular, required inspection and maintenance is a prerequisite for the warrantee to remain valid. If you don’t do the maintenance they recommend and something goes wrong with the car, the dealership can refuse to honour the warrantee.

I am not talking of routine inspection and maintenance; I am talking of topping up the air from time to time. I don’t see any need for it. If I see the tire running low (with just the naked eye), I will top up, but that has never happened. These days they have excellent, efficient inner liners and topping up is usually not necessary.
 
lone wolf
#26
You're unsafe....

With radial tires, you can't tell by looking. At 10 psi, the tire looks just as round as at 34 psi. Please hang a bright yellow warning sign on your vehicle so we can be a lane away when the blow-out happens.
 
gerryh
#27
Ron, many stations are either going this way or not having air available period. I suspect it has more to do with the cost of running a compressor to supply the air. Electrical cost, maintenance on the compressor, maintenance and replacement of the hoses and air chuck.
 
L Gilbert
#28
Inner liners? Um, Joey, we haven't used tubes/liners for decades. Even semis aren't using them. Tractors, backhoes, etc. still use them, but not highway vehicles.
 
gerryh
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post


I am not talking of routine inspection and maintenance; I am talking of topping up the air from time to time. I donít see any need for it. If I see the tire running low (with just the naked eye), I will top up, but that has never happened. These days they have excellent, efficient inner liners and topping up is usually not necessary.

Oh this is rich...rofl..... ol sjp can tell if a radial tire is 5 pounds low just by looking at it.
 
darkbeaver
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

So you are one of those people who sencelessly neglect routine vehicle inspections as per the handbook.

Now where did you get that, darkbeaver? I always carry out the routine inspections and maintenance as recommended. And the dealership makes it easy for me. When my car is due for inspection, they give me a call and I book an appointment (and I assume they do what needs to be done). Regular, required inspection and maintenance is a prerequisite for the warrantee to remain valid. If you don’t do the maintenance they recommend and something goes wrong with the car, the dealership can refuse to honour the warrantee.

I am not talking of routine inspection and maintenance; I am talking of topping up the air from time to time. I don’t see any need for it. If I see the tire running low (with just the naked eye), I will top up, but that has never happened. These days they have excellent, efficient inner liners and topping up is usually not necessary.

So you're admitting in a public forum that you do not inspect your vehicle as per the department of transportations vehicle guidelines. What you're saying is that you have no idea weather your lights are indeed working before you enter school and hospital zones and we only suppose that your wipers are functional. This routine is not some communist whim Sir Joe , it is painstakingly assembled regulation gleaned from countless motor vehicle misadventures many resulting in fatalities. Take a few seconds to establish your responsibility credentials before you use a public motor course please, do it for the blind kids who may not see your improperly illuminated Hyundie.
 

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