How Times Have Changed!


sanctus
#1
The Good Wife's Guide

From Housekeeping Monthly, 13 May, 1955.

  • Have dinner ready. Plan ahead, even the night before, to have a delicious meal ready on time for his return. This is a way of letting him know that you have be thinking about him and are concerned about his needs. Most men are hungry when they get home and the prospect of a good meal is part of the warm welcome needed.
  • Prepare yourself. Take 15 minutes to rest so you'll be refreshed when he arrives. Touch up your make-up, put a ribbon in your hair and be fresh-looking. He has just been with a lot of work-weary people.
  • Be a little gay and a little more interesting for him. His boring day may need a lift and one of your duties is to provide it.
  • Clear away the clutter. Make one last trip through the main part of the house just before your husband arrives. Run a dustcloth over the tables.
  • During the cooler months of the year you should prepare and light a fire for him to unwind by. Your husband will feel he has reached a haven of rest and order, and it will give you a lift too. After all, catering to his comfort will provide you with immense personal satisfaction.
  • Minimize all noise. At the time of his arrival, eliminate all noise of the washer, dryer or vacuum. Encourage the children to be quiet.
  • Be happy to see him.
  • Greet him with a warm smile and show sincerity in your desire to please him.
  • Listen to him. You may have a dozen important things to tell him, but the moment of his arrival is not the time. Let him talk first - remember, his topics of conversation are more important than yours.
  • Don't greet him with complaints and problems.
  • Don't complain if he's late for dinner or even if he stays out all night. Count this as minor compared to what he might have gone through at work.
  • Make him comfortable. Have him lean back in a comfortable chair or lie him down in the bedroom. Have a cool or warm drink ready for him.
  • Arrange his pillow and offer to take off his shoes. Speak in a low, soothing and pleasant voice.
  • Don't ask him questions about his actions or question his judgment or integrity. Remember, he is the master of the house and as such will always exercise his will with fairness and truthfulness. You have no right to question him.
  • A good wife always knows her place.
 
eh1eh
#2
I can't even imagine treating another that way. Maybe this would have fit just as well in the jokes forum.
 
sanctus
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by eh1eh View Post

I can't even imagine treating another that way. Maybe this would have fit just as well in the jokes forum.


Look at the year it was written! It is a piece of history. This is how the world was, not so long ago.
 
AmberEyes
#4
When you look at something like that, it really makes you appreciate how hard it was for the women living in those times, and how they fought so hard to change the way they were treated.
 
karrie
#5
And here I will risk being VERY unpopular.

Society has said that women should no longer be housewives, or be expected to take care of their hasband in this way. And so, when women DO decide to stay home and be housemakers, there are no expectations for them anymore. I know plenty of women who still expect their husband to work a full day AND make supper, because it is not socially acceptable for him to expect it of her, even if she's been home all day. While some of this is just laughable, I'll edit it to what I think is a reasonable list of expectations for a woman who chooses to stay home rather than work.





Plan nutritious meals (yes, plan! make a list, go shopping!)
Take care of yourself. This includes dressing in something other than sweatpants once in a while, brushing your hair and teeth at least once a day, and if at all possible, showering.
Keep in mind that his day might have sucked too, and try to accomodate for that.
Clean the damn house.
Try your best to create a peaceful environment for your family.
Above all else, if you can't fulfill your 'job requirements', figure out why and seek change.


 
AmberEyes
#6
I think it can be said of any "occupation" we have, do your best and make it pleasant for all. If a woman or man decides to stay home and be a housewife/husband then why not make it pleasant for all involved? If I had a man and he decided he wanted to stay home and take care of the kids and everything, I'd except him to do just that and not sit on his ass all day.
 
Sparrow
#7
I agree, however if both parents work outside the home they should share the jobs at home.
 
karrie
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Sparrow View Post

I agree, however if both parents work outside the home they should share the jobs at home.

Right now, my husband and I make a lot of sacrifices (relativel speaking in light of other married couples we know) so that I can stay home with my kids. We don't have a fifthwheel, no quad, we've never left the country on vacation, and we eat in a reastaurant only about once a month typically. When I started talking about going to work, my husband was excited to think of all we could do with the extra money. He was crestfallen when I pointed out that some of it would already be spent. I refuse to work all day, just to have the family scramble in the evenings to catch up housework, laundry, etc. If I'm going to work, we're getting a weekly housekeeper. That's all there is to it. I totally agree that it should be an even split of responsibility if both couples work, but, I also think that a housecleaner coming in once a week is the best idea all around. lol.
 
talloola
#9
My husband and I raised four daughters, we were married in l958. We both agreed that I would stay
in the home, and he would go out and work. I loved being at home, I worked very hard, I was never
considered lower than my husband, we have always been equal, and I was in charge of everything
financial, it just seemed to work better that way, as there is always one partner more capable of
some things than the other.
My kids never came home to an empty house, and I felt that was so important. We would have a
little more money if I had have worked, but there is so many expenses when both parents are gone
everyday, the extra money isn't enough to make much difference.
If the wife stays home, it doesn't mean the husband is supporting her, it means that they are sharing
whatever money comes into the house, as in reality, they are both working, one at home, one out in
the workplace. The indroductory article is ridiculous and exaggerated, it was not like that
at all, in general, maybe a few oddball families.
 
marygaspe
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

And here I will risk being VERY unpopular.

Society has said that women should no longer be housewives, or be expected to take care of their hasband in this way. And so, when women DO decide to stay home and be housemakers, there are no expectations for them anymore. I know plenty of women who still expect their husband to work a full day AND make supper, because it is not socially acceptable for him to expect it of her, even if she's been home all day. While some of this is just laughable, I'll edit it to what I think is a reasonable list of expectations for a woman who chooses to stay home rather than work.


Not unpopular at all. I took the same unpopular route back in the 1970's when our son was born. My husband made fairly good money, but we did give up allot to have me stay home. My kids had me in the house, a clean house, when they came home from school. The family had a hot, prepared dinner. We rarely ate out, mind you, and when we did we would let the kids choose so we ended up at McDonald's allot

I was chastised by allot of my girlfriends at the time.We had all grown up in the hurly-burly 1960's and feminism was our creed, until reality set in. For me, that reality was that I was not a feminist, I was more a humanist. I believe in the best of both sexes. We used to argue about having a choice, we got that choice and those of us who took the traditional choice were mocked. Odd.
 

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