Humboldt Broncos bus crash


B00Mer
#241
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

"No wait, lets say one of those killed because of this guys greed to make an extra $50 to $100 before quitting was your mother, your sister, your son or daughter.. hope thier life was worth the $100 bucks."
There is a classic example of where emotions, supersede reason and that sentiment has no business is a court room. A human life really can't be equated to any amount of money.


Your right, because you’re worthless..
 
JLM
#242
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Your right, because you’re worthless..


And you're WRONG because you have no respect for other's opinions. You seem to think that locking people up forever solves problems, but it doesn't - the victims are still dead and will remain dead, at huge expense to the taxpayer and huge waste of a resource.
 
justlooking
#243
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

He was guilty of dozens of traffic violations before the drove through the stop sign, JLM - dozens. .


Link for information ?
 
justlooking
+1
#244
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

And you're WRONG because you have no respect for other's opinions. You seem to think that locking people up forever solves problems, but it doesn't - the victims are still dead and will remain dead, at huge expense to the taxpayer and huge waste of a resource.


Reading about a nice long sentence might make the next new 'canadian' truck driver think twice about doing it.
 
JLM
#245
Quote: Originally Posted by justlooking View Post

Reading about a nice long sentence might make the next new 'canadian' truck driver think twice about doing it.


Maybe for a week! After that they just think it's something that will never happen to them! When they were hanging murderers it didn't reduce the number of murderers! (Don't get the idea that SOME murderers shouldn't be hanged) : )
 
JLM
#246
Quote: Originally Posted by justlooking View Post

Link for information ?

It should be kept in mind too, that "violations" are much different from "crimes".
 
Mowich
+2
#247
Quote: Originally Posted by justlooking View Post

Link for information ?

Government report into Humboldt crash lists 70 violations

MELFORT, Sask. -- A Saskatchewan government report says the driver of a semi-truck should not have been on the road the day he flew through a stop sign and caused a crash involving the Humboldt Broncos hockey team bus.

The report filed during the sentencing hearing for Jaskirat Singh Sidhu notes 70 violations of federal and provincial trucking regulations and inspection rules.

It includes the 11 days prior to the April 6, 2018, crash at a rural intersection that killed 16 people and injured 13 others.

"If Jaskirat Singh Sidhu had been stopped and inspected on April 6, 2018, prior to the incident he would have been placed under a 72-hour out-of-service declaration ... preventing him from operating a commercial vehicle," says the report.

The document is signed by two senior Saskatchewan government officials and is included in the RCMP's forensic collision reconstruction report.

It expresses concerns about the distances Singh was driving as well as the amount of time he took off to rest.

The report notes that if Singh had accurately documented his time at work on April 1 it "would have resulted in the driver being in violation of the maximum on-duty time of 14 hours for the day."

More: https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/govern...ions-1.4274115
 
Mowich
+1
#248
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The stop signs are a good clue that you need to stop then look both ways.


And the stop sign at that intersection was 4ms in diameter - much larger than normal stop signs and clearly visible.
 
Mowich
+1
#249
Humboldt Broncos case: Crown recommends 10-year prison sentence for semi driver

https://globalnews.ca/news/4910631/s...=notification/
 
petros
+2
#250
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Humboldt Broncos case: Crown recommends 10-year prison sentence for semi driver
https://globalnews.ca/news/4910631/s...=notification/

That is a fair sentence. 2nd degree murder gets less.
 
Hoof Hearted
+3
#251
The guilty driver should accept this sentence. 10 years...he'll probably be out in 6 under our lenient Canadian laws.
 
Mowich
+1
#252
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

That is a fair sentence. 2nd degree murder gets less.


I agree, pete. Listening to CTV news just now, I learned that Mr Sidhu has met personally with some of the families and some of the victims.
 
taxslave
#253
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoof Hearted View Post

The guilty driver should accept this sentence. 10 years...he'll probably be out in 6 under our lenient Canadian laws.

More like 3
 
Curious Cdn
#254
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

More like 3

Maybe, you guys can get together, draw and quarter him and bury the four parts at the corners of the country.
 
JLM
#255
I suppose any sentence that is handed down will pale in comparison to the guilt he will have to endure for the rest of his life. Another dimension is the added responsibility expected of those who operate heavy equipment, which has to be taken into account.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#256
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

"No wait, lets say one of those killed because of this guys greed to make an extra $50 to $100 before quitting was your mother, your sister, your son or daughter.. hope thier life was worth the $100 bucks."
There is a classic example of where emotions, supersede reason and that sentiment has no business is a court room. A human life really can't be equated to any amount of money.

That is correct, though of course courts do assign a monetary value to human lives. Not because they want to, but because that's really the only tool they have.

Here's a particularly chilling example of how the legal reasoning works. Once a young man fell off a high bridge, and in an attempt to save himself, grabbed a live power line on his way down. The line was not properly insulated, and the young man died of electrocution. His family sued the power company for negligence and wrongful death. The judge, noting that the young man was in the process of falling to his certain death, instructed the jury to calculate the value of his life for the few seconds between the time he was electrocuted and the time he would have died from the fall (or rather, the sudden stop at the end of it).
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#257
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

That is correct, though of course courts do assign a monetary value to human lives. Not because they want to, but because that's really the only tool they have.

Here's a particularly chilling example of how the legal reasoning works. Once a young man fell off a high bridge, and in an attempt to save himself, grabbed a live power line on his way down. The line was not properly insulated, and the young man died of electrocution. His family sued the power company for negligence and wrongful death. The judge, noting that the young man was in the process of falling to his certain death, instructed the jury to calculate the value of his life for the few seconds between the time he was electrocuted and the time he would have died from the fall (or rather, the sudden stop at the end of it).


The fact he has changed his mind and grabbed the power line did not factor in?
 
Curious Cdn
+2
#258
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

That is correct, though of course courts do assign a monetary value to human lives. Not because they want to, but because that's really the only tool they have.
Here's a particularly chilling example of how the legal reasoning works. Once a young man fell off a high bridge, and in an attempt to save himself, grabbed a live power line on his way down. The line was not properly insulated, and the young man died of electrocution. His family sued the power company for negligence and wrongful death. The judge, noting that the young man was in the process of falling to his certain death, instructed the jury to calculate the value of his life for the few seconds between the time he was electrocuted and the time he would have died from the fall (or rather, the sudden stop at the end of it).

Why weren't there proper warning labels on the bridge?

"Don't cross this bridge before disconnecting the electrical supply."

"Do not cross this brige if there is a chance that it may fall down. Check condition of structure before use"

"Do not cross this brige if there are live crocodiles in the vicinity."

I ACCEPT I DO NOT ACCEPT
 
JLM
#259
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

That is correct, though of course courts do assign a monetary value to human lives. Not because they want to, but because that's really the only tool they have.

Here's a particularly chilling example of how the legal reasoning works. Once a young man fell off a high bridge, and in an attempt to save himself, grabbed a live power line on his way down. The line was not properly insulated, and the young man died of electrocution. His family sued the power company for negligence and wrongful death. The judge, noting that the young man was in the process of falling to his certain death, instructed the jury to calculate the value of his life for the few seconds between the time he was electrocuted and the time he would have died from the fall (or rather, the sudden stop at the end of it).


For that segment of his life...………………..maybe 50 cents!
 

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