Humboldt Broncos bus crash


B00Mer
-1
#241
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

"No wait, lets say one of those killed because of this guys greed to make an extra $50 to $100 before quitting was your mother, your sister, your son or daughter.. hope thier life was worth the $100 bucks."
There is a classic example of where emotions, supersede reason and that sentiment has no business is a court room. A human life really can't be equated to any amount of money.


Your right, because you’re worthless..
 
JLM
+1 / -1
#242
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Your right, because you’re worthless..


And you're WRONG because you have no respect for other's opinions. You seem to think that locking people up forever solves problems, but it doesn't - the victims are still dead and will remain dead, at huge expense to the taxpayer and huge waste of a resource.
 
justlooking
#243
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

He was guilty of dozens of traffic violations before the drove through the stop sign, JLM - dozens. .


Link for information ?
 
justlooking
+1
#244
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

And you're WRONG because you have no respect for other's opinions. You seem to think that locking people up forever solves problems, but it doesn't - the victims are still dead and will remain dead, at huge expense to the taxpayer and huge waste of a resource.


Reading about a nice long sentence might make the next new 'canadian' truck driver think twice about doing it.
 
JLM
+1 / -1
#245
Quote: Originally Posted by justlooking View Post

Reading about a nice long sentence might make the next new 'canadian' truck driver think twice about doing it.


Maybe for a week! After that they just think it's something that will never happen to them! When they were hanging murderers it didn't reduce the number of murderers! (Don't get the idea that SOME murderers shouldn't be hanged) : )
 
JLM
-1
#246
Quote: Originally Posted by justlooking View Post

Link for information ?

It should be kept in mind too, that "violations" are much different from "crimes".
 
Mowich
+3
#247
Quote: Originally Posted by justlooking View Post

Link for information ?

Government report into Humboldt crash lists 70 violations

MELFORT, Sask. -- A Saskatchewan government report says the driver of a semi-truck should not have been on the road the day he flew through a stop sign and caused a crash involving the Humboldt Broncos hockey team bus.

The report filed during the sentencing hearing for Jaskirat Singh Sidhu notes 70 violations of federal and provincial trucking regulations and inspection rules.

It includes the 11 days prior to the April 6, 2018, crash at a rural intersection that killed 16 people and injured 13 others.

"If Jaskirat Singh Sidhu had been stopped and inspected on April 6, 2018, prior to the incident he would have been placed under a 72-hour out-of-service declaration ... preventing him from operating a commercial vehicle," says the report.

The document is signed by two senior Saskatchewan government officials and is included in the RCMP's forensic collision reconstruction report.

It expresses concerns about the distances Singh was driving as well as the amount of time he took off to rest.

The report notes that if Singh had accurately documented his time at work on April 1 it "would have resulted in the driver being in violation of the maximum on-duty time of 14 hours for the day."

More: https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/govern...ions-1.4274115
 
Mowich
+1
#248
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The stop signs are a good clue that you need to stop then look both ways.


And the stop sign at that intersection was 4ms in diameter - much larger than normal stop signs and clearly visible.
 
Mowich
+1
#249
Humboldt Broncos case: Crown recommends 10-year prison sentence for semi driver

https://globalnews.ca/news/4910631/s...=notification/
 
petros
+2
#250
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Humboldt Broncos case: Crown recommends 10-year prison sentence for semi driver
https://globalnews.ca/news/4910631/s...=notification/

That is a fair sentence. 2nd degree murder gets less.
 
Hoof Hearted
+3
#251
The guilty driver should accept this sentence. 10 years...he'll probably be out in 6 under our lenient Canadian laws.
 
Mowich
+1
#252
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

That is a fair sentence. 2nd degree murder gets less.


I agree, pete. Listening to CTV news just now, I learned that Mr Sidhu has met personally with some of the families and some of the victims.
 
taxslave
#253
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoof Hearted View Post

The guilty driver should accept this sentence. 10 years...he'll probably be out in 6 under our lenient Canadian laws.

More like 3
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#254
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

More like 3

Maybe, you guys can get together, draw and quarter him and bury the four parts at the corners of the country.
 
JLM
+1 / -1
#255
I suppose any sentence that is handed down will pale in comparison to the guilt he will have to endure for the rest of his life. Another dimension is the added responsibility expected of those who operate heavy equipment, which has to be taken into account.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#256
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

"No wait, lets say one of those killed because of this guys greed to make an extra $50 to $100 before quitting was your mother, your sister, your son or daughter.. hope thier life was worth the $100 bucks."
There is a classic example of where emotions, supersede reason and that sentiment has no business is a court room. A human life really can't be equated to any amount of money.

That is correct, though of course courts do assign a monetary value to human lives. Not because they want to, but because that's really the only tool they have.

Here's a particularly chilling example of how the legal reasoning works. Once a young man fell off a high bridge, and in an attempt to save himself, grabbed a live power line on his way down. The line was not properly insulated, and the young man died of electrocution. His family sued the power company for negligence and wrongful death. The judge, noting that the young man was in the process of falling to his certain death, instructed the jury to calculate the value of his life for the few seconds between the time he was electrocuted and the time he would have died from the fall (or rather, the sudden stop at the end of it).
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#257
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

That is correct, though of course courts do assign a monetary value to human lives. Not because they want to, but because that's really the only tool they have.

Here's a particularly chilling example of how the legal reasoning works. Once a young man fell off a high bridge, and in an attempt to save himself, grabbed a live power line on his way down. The line was not properly insulated, and the young man died of electrocution. His family sued the power company for negligence and wrongful death. The judge, noting that the young man was in the process of falling to his certain death, instructed the jury to calculate the value of his life for the few seconds between the time he was electrocuted and the time he would have died from the fall (or rather, the sudden stop at the end of it).


The fact he has changed his mind and grabbed the power line did not factor in?
 
Curious Cdn
+2
#258
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

That is correct, though of course courts do assign a monetary value to human lives. Not because they want to, but because that's really the only tool they have.
Here's a particularly chilling example of how the legal reasoning works. Once a young man fell off a high bridge, and in an attempt to save himself, grabbed a live power line on his way down. The line was not properly insulated, and the young man died of electrocution. His family sued the power company for negligence and wrongful death. The judge, noting that the young man was in the process of falling to his certain death, instructed the jury to calculate the value of his life for the few seconds between the time he was electrocuted and the time he would have died from the fall (or rather, the sudden stop at the end of it).

Why weren't there proper warning labels on the bridge?

"Don't cross this bridge before disconnecting the electrical supply."

"Do not cross this brige if there is a chance that it may fall down. Check condition of structure before use"

"Do not cross this brige if there are live crocodiles in the vicinity."

I ACCEPT I DO NOT ACCEPT
 
JLM
-1
#259
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

That is correct, though of course courts do assign a monetary value to human lives. Not because they want to, but because that's really the only tool they have.

Here's a particularly chilling example of how the legal reasoning works. Once a young man fell off a high bridge, and in an attempt to save himself, grabbed a live power line on his way down. The line was not properly insulated, and the young man died of electrocution. His family sued the power company for negligence and wrongful death. The judge, noting that the young man was in the process of falling to his certain death, instructed the jury to calculate the value of his life for the few seconds between the time he was electrocuted and the time he would have died from the fall (or rather, the sudden stop at the end of it).


For that segment of his life...………………..maybe 50 cents!
 
spaminator
#260
’MUCH, MUCH SLOWER': Coroner promises change after Humboldt mix-up
Canadian Press
Published:
February 25, 2019
Updated:
February 25, 2019 5:19 PM EST
A memorial for the 2018 crash where 16 people died and 13 injured when a truck collided with the Humboldt Broncos hockey team bus, is shown at the crash site on Wednesday, January 30, 2019 in Tisdale, Sask. Saskatchewan's coroner's service has released its report into the Humboldt Broncos bus crash and it calls for tougher enforcement of trucking rules and mandatory seatbelts on highway buses.Ryan Remiorz / THE CANADIAN PRESS
REGINA — Saskatchewan’s chief coroner says a public mix-up in identifying two hockey players involved in the deadly Humboldt Broncos bus crash means, in the future, his office will be more careful in releasing names.
“Things will be much, much slower,” Clive Weighill said Monday, as he released his report into the April 2018 crash.
“We will not identify anybody and put anything out until we are 100 per cent positive.”
One of the six recommendations in Weighill’s report further calls on the Saskatchewan Health Authority to review how dead as well as injured patients are identified in such situations.
The mix-up involved 18-year-old players Xavier LaBelle, originally thought to be killed in the crash, and Parker Tobin, who was thought to be in hospital.
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LaBelle’s family had voiced uncertainty in identifying a body they were told was his and dental records had been ordered when he woke up in hospital saying he wasn’t Tobin.
Weighill said the coroner’s office was relying on information provided by hospitals about who the surviving players were and was working through a process of elimination with families to identify the dead.
But the identification process was not fully complete by the time a public memorial was held in Humboldt two days after crash.
“There was a lot of public pressure,” Weighill said. “There was media pressure, there was social media pressure.
“I can say probably from now on everybody that would come in is going to be a Jane Doe or a John Doe until we have a positive (identity) on each specific person.”
A spokesman from the Saskatchewan Health Authority said the agency accepts the coroner’s recommendation.
“We apologize to all those affected and we will endeavour to do our best to ensure this never happens again,” said spokesman Doug Dahl.
Sixteen people killed last April when a transport truck barrelled through a stop sign at a rural crossroads north of Tisdale and into the path of the junior hockey team’s bus. Thirteen others on the bus were injured.
While truck driver Jaskirat Singh Sidhu has pleaded guilty to dangerous driving and is awaiting sentencing, the coroner’s report officially lists the deaths as accidental.
Weighill also recommended his office develop a mass casualty plan. He said one would be in place by March.
Remaining recommendations were aimed at other government agencies.
The report said the Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways should look at its policy on signs at the intersection where the crash occurred and Saskatchewan Government Insurance should implement mandatory truck driver training.
“A tragedy this size, it can’t just be one thing that went wrong,” said Scott Thomas, whose son Evan was killed.
Thomas said the coroner’s findings are justification for some of the changes that he and other families have been calling for.
He appreciated the recommendations directed to Transport Canada for mandatory seatbelts on highway buses and improving national safety codes for truck driver training and electronic logging.
Injured Humboldt Broncos player planning spinal surgery in Thailand
Dad of Humboldt player got apology in tearful meeting with truck driver
‘SO SORRY ABOUT THIS PAIN’: Driver takes responsibility for Humboldt bus crash
Calgary trucker shouldn’t have been driving on day of Humboldt crash: report
In December, the Saskatchewan government announced it will make training mandatory for semi-truck drivers starting in March. Drivers seeking a Class 1 commercial licence will have to undergo at least 121 1/2 hours of training.
But Thomas said there needs to be a national standard.
“To me, this has to be a nationally regulated profession and these guys should be treated as professionals just like airplane pilots are,” he said.
Transport Canada announced in June that the department will require all newly built highway buses to have seatbelts by September 2020. Some charter bus companies have said that, while many new vehicles already have seatbelts, there is no way to ensure passengers are wearing them.
“A lot of the injuries were because people were ejected from the bus,” said Weighill. “We can’t say for sure if that would have been a big substantial difference or not to the injuries, but we feel that it would certainly lead to a safer environment.”
Thomas said he would like to see the coroner’s report made binding.
A coroner’s report into a crash at the same intersection that killed six people in 1997 recommended installing an additional warning device such as rumble strips. The government at the time declined.
“If the government would have acted after the ’97 coroner’s report, rumble strips would have been there,” said Thomas. “I’ve got to think that would have significantly changed the outcome of that day.”
http://torontosun.com/news/national/...umboldt-mix-up
 
spaminator
#261
Injured Humboldt Broncos player planning spinal surgery in Thailand
Canadian Press
Published:
February 25, 2019
Updated:
February 25, 2019 8:48 AM EST
Humboldt Broncos bus crash survivor Ryan Straschnitzki attends a physiotherapy session with kinesiologist Kirill Dubrovskiy, left, and physiotherapist Nelson Morela, centre, in Calgary on August 20, 2018.Jeff McIntosh / THE CANADIAN PRESS
CALGARY — A hockey player paralyzed in the Humboldt Broncos bus crash is planning to head to Thailand in his quest to get better.
Ryan Straschnitzki of Airdrie, Alta. plans to undergo an experimental surgical procedure on his spine that he hopes can restore some movement below the level of his injury.
“It’s kind of cool. Turning humans into robots,” the 19-year-old said with a laugh in a recent interview with The Canadian Press.
Straschnitzki and 12 others on the Saskatchewan junior hockey team were injured when a semi truck blew through a stop sign and into the path of the team’s bus last April.
Sixteen people died.
Straschnitzki was paralyzed from the chest down. He hopes the surgery might help him improve his daily life.
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An epidural stimulation implant would be placed in his back. With the use of a small device like a remote control, the implant sends electrical currents to the spinal cord to stimulate nerves and move his limbs, bypassing traditional pathways.
The implant can be programmed to stimulate certain nerves mapped out by surgeons and therapists.
“It works and it’s safe and I can’t wait,” Straschnitzki said. “In the end, I think it will be worth it so I can have control over things that I didn’t have control over before and things that are out of my power.
“Just getting some core muscles back would be awesome.”
Straschnitzki was inspired to try the procedure by Calgary surgeon Dr. Richi Gill, who had the operation last year after he was paralyzed in an accident.
Only a half dozen people in Canada have had it done abroad and only about 30 worldwide.
The executive director of the Synaptic Spinal Cord Injury and Neuro Rehabilitation Centre in Calgary said Straschnitzki could be in Thailand in April or May. He would stay there between four and six weeks.
“Ryan is certainly a prime candidate for a procedure like this. So once we finish communicating with Thailand, Ryan should be approved to go ahead with the procedure,” Uyen Nguyen said.
“The sooner this could happen the better.”
Nguyen cautioned it isn’t a cure, but it is new therapy that’s growing in popularity. The surgery is relatively straight forward.
“It is a device that goes over the spinal cord and sends messages out to the rest of the body,” she said. “It is the rehab afterwards that is arduous and tedious and that’s where Ryan’s strength and fortitude comes in. You have to commit.”
The surgery can cost up to $100,000 and isn’t covered by health care or insurance. It is also performed in countries such as the United States and Switzerland, but it’s much cheaper in Thailand.
Straschnitzki’s parents say it’s worth it.
“The possibility is he could walk and get out of that wheelchair. That’s the main thing right there,” said Tom Straschnitzki.
Michelle Straschnitzki is a little more cautious.
“I just don’t want to get up any false hopes,” she said. “I think he’s going in with a very strong attitude and, provided everything goes well, I think the sky’s the limit for him.”
Ryan Straschnitzki said he is a bit nervous but will cope with his jitters.
“I mean there’s always going to be nerves with everything you do and I think I just have to overcome that — keeping that positive mind set, pushing myself every day and having the hope that I can walk again.”
http://torontosun.com/news/national/...ry-in-thailand
 
Cannuck
-2
#262
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Jail, yes. Jail for ever-and-ever is quite totally whacko.

Some folks are just too emotional. There’s no logical reason for locking the guy up and throwing away the key.

Besides, truck driving is a shitty job and it’s hard enough finding people to do it. I feel sorry for the guy
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#263
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Some folks are just too emotional. There’s no logical reason for locking the guy up and throwing away the key.
Besides, truck driving is a shitty job and it’s hard enough finding people to do it. I feel sorry for the guy

I"m sure that he sees the horror every time he closes his eyes.
 
JLM
+1 / -1
#264
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I"m sure that he sees the horror every time he closes his eyes.


I guess if there is any situation to get emotional about, this has to be it. I couldn't imagine not being emotional if I lost a family member this way. Still, locking the poor guy up and throwing away the key, isn't going to improve the situation on iota. He made the same mistake most of us make at some point.
 
B00Mer
#265
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Some folks are just too emotional. There’s no logical reason for locking the guy up and throwing away the key.
Besides, truck driving is a shitty job and it’s hard enough finding people to do it. I feel sorry for the guy

Kinda like those bottle depot workers
 
B00Mer
#266
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I guess if there is any situation to get emotional about, this has to be it. I couldn't imagine not being emotional if I lost a family member this way. Still, locking the poor guy up and throwing away the key, isn't going to improve the situation on iota. He made the same mistake most of us make at some point.

You admitting to running a stop sign and killing people??

Not sure most of us have made that mistake, or plan on too.. you're an idiot.

...and Cannuck you can suck my ass hairs..
 
JLM
+2 / -1
#267
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

You admitting to running a stop sign and killing people??

Not sure most of us have made that mistake, or plan on too.. you're an idiot.

...and Cannuck you can suck my ass hairs..


You never ran a stop sign? You're right about one thing. Cannuck is an idiot.
 
B00Mer
+2
#268
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

You never ran a stop sign? You're right about one thing. Cannuck is an idiot.

I am sure I have in the past.. can't remember..

But if I was drunk, or was high on drugs, or was running illegally in my log books (because I shouldn't have been there to begin with) and killed someone.. then I would expect to be locked up as well.

Look, I have been driving (flying) commercial vehicles for 37 years, tractor trailers, buses and planes.

When you step into a vehicle that is 80,000 lbs gross weight, you are a lethal bullet running down the highway.

The drivers today, tailgate, push you down the road because of their size, and drive recklessly.

There are laws that govern commercial drivers, and my CVOR report from Alberta shows infractions and stops across the USA and Canada.

If you break those laws, and drive illegally, it's no better than having a loaded gun.

They limit the amount of time a commercial driver can be on the road for a reason.. fatigue is more deadly than being drunk.. because when you are drunk and you get behind the wheel, your body is already starting to sober up..

Someone who is tired, is just getting more tired, and with 80,000 lbs a mishap of crossing the center line, missing a red light, stop sign or not stopping in time can kill.

A person holding a commercial license, a pilot license is held to a higher standard than those with a regular license.. and therefore, if you break the law, and are responsible for multiple deaths, if for nothing else you should be made an example of for other commercial drivers who might pull the same BS.

Oh and Cannuck, remember all your little childish comments about Truck Drivers.. I own my own rig, (several rigs & an Internet Company) paid out the balance.. and still have plenty left over for toys.. like motorcycles, trucks, boats, women and condos..

When you're not such a loser working in a bottle depot, then feel free to try and compare yourself to me. (get a real job bro to support your family)








Last edited by B00Mer; Mar 7th, 2019 at 08:55 PM..
 
B00Mer
#269
Okay now that I am done ranting, I am going to sit back and watch my DirecTV in my truck and do my 10 hour reset before I drive again..

 
Curious Cdn
#270
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Okay now that I am done ranting, I am going to sit back and watch my DirecTV in my truck and do my 10 hour reset before I drive again..

That's a big moose catcher on the front.

I sure hope that you don't catch any.
 

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