There's now a Canadian consensus on climate change


mentalfloss
#1
Canadians want action on climate change

A survey on Canadians’ views about climate change has shown that the vast majority majority (88 per cent) want Canada to take significant actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Ottawa- These findings come as Canada's environment minister travels to the United Nations climate change summit, which is due to take place this week. Designed to put some political pressure on the high profile visit, the David Suzuki Foundation has released the survey results. The survey has been conducted by the Environics Institute for Survey Research. Key headlines from the survey report are that Canadians have a strong concern (78 per cent) about what climate change will mean for their children and future generations.

To add to this, other issues relate to scarcity of water and more frequent droughts; an increase with extreme weather events , such as, storms and flooding; and the loss of wildlife.

Commenting on the survey results, Keith Neuman, executive director of the Environics Institute stated: “While climate change has not been a top-of-mind political issue that has attracted much attention in the media or during elections, this survey reminds us that a growing majority of Canadians have concluded that climate change is a serious problem that requires serious government attention.”

In terms of the financial impact, the survey indicated that the majority of the public support for a tax on carbon-based fuels across Canada. Here, for instance, six in 10 British Columbians support their existing carbon tax, and 56 per cent of Canadians elsewhere say they would support a British Columbia type of carbon tax in their own provinces. A carbon tax is seen as an incentive for governments and companies to pollute less. A carbon tax is a tax levied on the carbon content of fuels. It is a form of carbon pricing. From an economic perspective, carbon taxes are a type of Pigovian tax (a tax applied to a market activity that is generating negative externalities.) They help to address the problem of emitters of greenhouse gases not facing the full (social) costs of their actions.

Environics regards the survey results as extremely important, particularly given what they perceive to be Canada’s standing in the industrialized world. With regard to this, reports published by Climate Action Network Europe and Germanwatch and the Washington-based Center for Global Development have ranked Canada’s climate performance to be at the lowest rung relative to other industrialized countries.

The survey was based on telephone interviews conducted with 2,020 Canadians between October 16 and 19, 2014.

Read more: Canadians want action on climate change
 
EagleSmack
+1
#2
Is Canada going to pay the $14 BILLION owed to the UN?




errr...ahhhh... ummmm
 
Walter
#3
What a huge pile of BS. Who paid for the survey?
 
Goober
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

What a huge pile of BS. Who paid for the survey?

Social Research in Canada | Canada Public Opinion | The Environics Institute
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+3
#5  Top Rated Post
Did it ask what each of these Canadians would be willing to give up in higher prices/taxes or reduced ability to drive? Or be without a job?

I am all for reducing and recycling and all that stuff but I don't see the point in tanking our economy or my personal lifestyle to satisfy a fairy tale.
 
gerryh
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Goober View Post

Social Research in Canada | Canada Public Opinion | The Environics Institute




The left wings answer to the right wings Fraser institute.
 
Locutus
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Canadians want action on climate change

lol, yeah, sure they do kid.

here's what Canadians are most interested in pal:

MYWorld2015 Analytics

http://forums.canadiancontent.net/in...nge-still.html
 
lone wolf
+1
#8
Just on the off-chance that climate change is a natural and irreversable cycle, don't you suppose it would be wise to put resources toward getting ready for it rather than wasting effort on halting the tides?
 
gerryh
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

Just on the off-chance that climate change is a natural and irreversable cycle, don't you suppose it would be wise to put resources toward getting ready for it rather than wasting effort on halting the tides?




No, the best thing is chicken little.
 
petros
#10
I already moved inland. Now what?
 
lone wolf
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

I already moved inland. Now what?

Depends... Will it be falling sky or rising water?
 
JLM
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

Is Canada going to pay the $14 BILLION owed to the UN?




errr...ahhhh... ummmm


The U.N. has done nothing to warrant $14 let alone $14 billion since 1945!
 
Locutus
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

Just on the off-chance that climate change is a natural and irreversable cycle, don't you suppose it would be wise to put resources toward getting ready for it rather than wasting effort on halting the tides?

I imagine mankind will be extinct before the next widespread change. there is nothing for anyone to worry about, especially the chatter from the agenda driven drones.

well, maybe some buckaroo group/nation that might EMP or otherwise disrupt the american power grid for a few stone age years. that'll give people something to focus on.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdCaV3ELvsM
 
lone wolf
#14
That long? I bet there'll be a lot of disappointed HVAC and insulation folk
 
Brewster
+1 / -1
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

Did it ask what each of these Canadians would be willing to give up in higher prices/taxes or reduced ability to drive? Or be without a job?

I am all for reducing and recycling and all that stuff but I don't see the point in tanking our economy or my personal lifestyle to satisfy a fairy tale.

Total Rubbish - Have you taken a look at what's happening in British Columbia since they put in the Carbon Tax?


And made sure that money went to those who need it?


They have the fastest growing economy in the country, including oil-rich Alberta.


Moving to new technology and giving spending money to those who need it most is always the best way to get an economy moving.


Using the money to throw more junk into the air and pollute the environment is the worst.


What makes it even worse is watching China churn out more and more Green Tech - soon they will just bury us in one more technical field, selling the stuff all over the world while our exports go nowhere and the best job our kids can find is flipping Burgers at McDonald's and shipping those profits to the US.


Nothing like turning our country into a Bankrupt Sewer
 
petros
+1
#16
SK has the fastest growing economy. BC got sh-tloads of ActionPlan money for port upgrades to move goods from the Prairie to port.

That money came with a pipeline or two.

Have a nice day.
 
Locutus
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Brewster View Post

Total Rubbish

welcome 'new' guy.
 
petros
#18
Jib rats scurrying amongst the blackberry bushes.
 
Colpy
+1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Canadians want action on climate change

A survey on Canadians’ views about climate change has shown that the vast majority majority (88 per cent) want Canada to take significant actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Ottawa- These findings come as Canada's environment minister travels to the United Nations climate change summit, which is due to take place this week. Designed to put some political pressure on the high profile visit, the David Suzuki Foundation has released the survey results. The survey has been conducted by the Environics Institute for Survey Research. Key headlines from the survey report are that Canadians have a strong concern (78 per cent) about what climate change will mean for their children and future generations.

To add to this, other issues relate to scarcity of water and more frequent droughts; an increase with extreme weather events , such as, storms and flooding; and the loss of wildlife.

Commenting on the survey results, Keith Neuman, executive director of the Environics Institute stated: “While climate change has not been a top-of-mind political issue that has attracted much attention in the media or during elections, this survey reminds us that a growing majority of Canadians have concluded that climate change is a serious problem that requires serious government attention.”

In terms of the financial impact, the survey indicated that the majority of the public support for a tax on carbon-based fuels across Canada. Here, for instance, six in 10 British Columbians support their existing carbon tax, and 56 per cent of Canadians elsewhere say they would support a British Columbia type of carbon tax in their own provinces. A carbon tax is seen as an incentive for governments and companies to pollute less. A carbon tax is a tax levied on the carbon content of fuels. It is a form of carbon pricing. From an economic perspective, carbon taxes are a type of Pigovian tax (a tax applied to a market activity that is generating negative externalities.) They help to address the problem of emitters of greenhouse gases not facing the full (social) costs of their actions.

Environics regards the survey results as extremely important, particularly given what they perceive to be Canada’s standing in the industrialized world. With regard to this, reports published by Climate Action Network Europe and Germanwatch and the Washington-based Center for Global Development have ranked Canada’s climate performance to be at the lowest rung relative to other industrialized countries.

The survey was based on telephone interviews conducted with 2,020 Canadians between October 16 and 19, 2014.

Read more: Canadians want action on climate change

There is a consensus.

It is

WHO CARES????
 
Brewster
#20
Ahh, I see I was looking at older data, and for several years in a row - You are correct about the last full year's stats. SK had the best yearR.

Quote: Originally Posted by Locutus View Post

welcome 'new' guy.

Thank you - I can see I'll have to be careful - I've been on a couple of American Forums lately, and they rarely check anything.


I think I'll like this better.
 
taxslave
+1
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

What a huge pile of BS. Who paid for the survey?

The three people that responded to it.

Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

That long? I bet there'll be a lot of disappointed HVAC and insulation folk

Maybe but they can have new careers in mud hut construction.

Quote: Originally Posted by Brewster View Post

Total Rubbish - Have you taken a look at what's happening in British Columbia since they put in the Carbon Tax?


And made sure that money went to those who need it?


They have the fastest growing economy in the country, including oil-rich Alberta.


Moving to new technology and giving spending money to those who need it most is always the best way to get an economy moving.


Using the money to throw more junk into the air and pollute the environment is the worst.


What makes it even worse is watching China churn out more and more Green Tech - soon they will just bury us in one more technical field, selling the stuff all over the world while our exports go nowhere and the best job our kids can find is flipping Burgers at McDonald's and shipping those profits to the US.


Nothing like turning our country into a Bankrupt Sewer

The carbon tax is killing us here in BC. Stupid idea and nothing but a scam.
 
pgs
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Brewster View Post

Total Rubbish - Have you taken a look at what's happening in British Columbia since they put in the Carbon Tax?


And made sure that money went to those who need it?


They have the fastest growing economy in the country, including oil-rich Alberta.


Moving to new technology and giving spending money to those who need it most is always the best way to get an economy moving.


Using the money to throw more junk into the air and pollute the environment is the worst.


What makes it even worse is watching China churn out more and more Green Tech - soon they will just bury us in one more technical field, selling the stuff all over the world while our exports go nowhere and the best job our kids can find is flipping Burgers at McDonald's and shipping those profits to the US.


Nothing like turning our country into a Bankrupt Sewer

Yup taking tax dollars from cash strapped school districts and giving it to cash strapped companies like Western Forest Products for planting trees .
 
skookumchuck
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Jib rats scurrying amongst the blackberry bushes.

Would that be the same as mouthy hunky stubble jumpers?
 
Kreskin
+1
#24
In BC we make solar powered night vision goggles.
 
waldo
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Locutus View Post

lol, yeah, sure they do kid.

here's what Canadians are most interested in pal:

MYWorld2015 Analytics

http://forums.canadiancontent.net/in...nge-still.html

no - as I pointed out in that thread you've linked to, notwithstanding the mega overreach you made... for whatever value that survey/vote holds, this is what (the very few number of) Canadians that voted chose as their priorities:


(note: if you tweak education and/or age you can get 'climate change action' into the MyWorld 'top 6' prioritization )

Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

The carbon tax is killing us here in BC. Stupid idea and nothing but a scam.

gee... that's sure counter to what the BC government is saying. Can ya help a brother out and provide some support/foundation to your "killing claim"?
 
waldo
+1
#26
Per the 39-nation Pew Research Center survey of ~ 38 thousand respondents... Canadian respondents consider the threat of global climate change as the top global threat:

 
mentalfloss
#27
Dat Financial Post climate change bias.



Why the call for bigger and better carbon taxes is about to escalate

A large number of governments, climate activists and corporate interests have a vested interest in keeping oil prices high

When the first OPEC oil crisis struck in 1973, sending the price of crude as high as US$140 a barrel in today’s dollars, policymakers around the world — including Canada — scrambled for ways to bring the price back down. Today, the opposite is true. As the 2014 OPEC crisis pushed oil down to US$65 Monday, the major policy objective in many circles is to find a way to bring the price back up.

Consumers may like the idea of low energy prices and the inevitable boost to global economic growth, opening the door on a world of increasing prosperity and wealth distribution. But a large number of governments, climate activists and corporate interests have a vested interest in keeping oil prices high. Will they succeed?

As the world price of oil fell over the past few days, there has been no shortage of handwringing over the negative consequences.

[kaltura-widget uiconfid=”23273481″ entryid=”0_uljtdoik” ]

The U.S. shale oil industry was said to be doomed. Oil-rich nations dependent on massive dollar flows would be unable to meet their budget and debt payments. Capital investment in developing countries with oil potential would dry up. Big oil companies would suffer as share prices plunged.

And there would certainly have been no cheering Monday in Lima, Peru, where international climate negotiators were gearing up for the 20th annual United Nations’ Climate Change Conference. Low oil prices equal increased demand for oil that will drive up carbon emissions.

With the price of oil down about $50 from its last peak, climate policy advocates have lost a big unofficial carbon tax. On the rough estimate that there’s a tonne of carbon in every three barrels of oil, the world has just watched a $150-a-tonne carbon price get wiped out.

As the price of gasoline falls, the pressure will rise on governments to refill the gap with a direct carbon tax. The idea has already been picked up by Forbes columnist Tim Worstall. “The fall in the price of oil means we can impose [a] sane and sensible 50-cent gas tax [in the United States] without the pain being too great or apparent.”

[related_links /]

In weeks and months to come, calls for bigger and better carbon taxes will escalate, locally and internationally. Paul Boothe, a professor at the Ivey Business School at the University of Western Ontario, says Alberta Premier Jim Prentice may look upon a carbon tax opportunity as part of trade-off with Ontario and Quebec over pipeline policy. A $30 carbon tax would give Alberta an opportunity “get in front of the carbon issue.” Mr. Prentice on Monday even announced that he was ready to review the province’s carbon levy.

Internationally, as the UN climate negotiations in Lima this week adjourn and move to Paris next year, the low price of oil will loom even larger as an impediment to achieving global emissions targets. Some will see it as an opportunity promote carbon taxes to offset the OPEC-generated decline in the price of oil.

In booming economic conditions it might be possible for governments to raise energy taxes by portraying them as painless replacements to cover the shortfall left by the sudden move to lower oil prices. But economic conditions — in the United States, China and Europe — are far from robust. Any attempt by governments to seize the gasoline price gap with new carbon taxes is likely to meet stiff opposition.

Elsewhere, the complexity of the trade-offs to come in the wake of dramatically lower world oil prices has perhaps not fully registered.

Within the United States alone many contradictory forces are at work. Low oil prices boost the economy, but the value of U.S. oil exports yields lower returns. The impact on the Keystone XL pipeline decision is far from clear. Where does the new low price leave President Barack Obama’s climate plan?

Canadians may like the idea of lower gas prices as consumers, but a vast network of interests — corporate and government — are now aligned around building pipelines and exporting oil to a world that now operates on lower margins.

Renewable energy companies and biofuel producers will also come under competitive pressures if oil prices stay low and ethanol subsidies look more and more ridiculous.

And then there’s inflation. The first OPEC crisis in 1973 triggered massive monetary expansion by central banks, leading to a global inflation outbreak that continued for a decade and took another decade to bring under control. Today the worry is deflation, a concern that is likely to escalate as the fall in oil prices drives down consumer price indices around the world.

A decade of bad policy, including Canada’s disastrous National Energy Program, followed the first OPEC crisis. The challenge in 2014 is to avoid making a new series of policy disasters.

Terence Corcoran: Why the call for bigger and better carbon taxes is about to escalate | Financial Post
 
captain morgan
+1
#28
MF, the price of a bbl today is the result of geopolitics via OPEC (Saudi Arabia). They will change the supply to raise the price once they feel they are ready.

The article above assumes the value of oil will remain low from this point forward.
 
Walter
#29
Supply and demand. The US has doubled it's output in the last 7 years, that is why the price is dropping. OPEC ain't got nuthin to do with it.
 
Dixie Cup
#30
If that's true, then its unfortunate as we're being taken for a ride. But, stupid is as stupid does I guess. sigh...I'm glad to think people actually think we can afford to pay more for literally everything - as tho' we don't pay enough for stuff as it is. Our poverty rate is gonna rise but the greenies, who seem to be in the upper 1% of so, could care less about those of us in the middle to lower class.


I'm hoping I'm not going to be around when the sh**t hits the fan!


JMHO

Quote: Originally Posted by waldo View Post

Per the 39-nation Pew Research Center survey of ~ 38 thousand respondents... Canadian respondents consider the threat of global climate change as the top global threat:


Actually, I'm not sure that's true. There have been other "polls" done where this is the LAST thing on the list of concerns for Canadians. The first one or two is the economy and jobs!! I'd take this with a grain of salt.


JMO
 

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