Nasty left-wing Guardian calls poppy installation "Ukip-style memorial"


Blackleaf
+1
#1
The nasty left-wing Bible, The Grauniad, has provoked outrage after calling the poppy memorial at the Tower of London a "Ukip-style memorial."

The installation, called Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, is seeing 888,246 ceramic poppies - one for each British military fatality in WWI - being installed in the Tower of London's now-dry moat, with the last one to be ceremonially placed there on Remembrance Sunday.

Now, armed forces charities accused the left-wing newspaper of trying to politicise the tribute to those killed during the First World War.

They sprang to the defence of the installation after the online article by a former Turner Prize judge described it as ‘trite, fake, and inward-looking’.


In a provocative critique, author Jonathan Jones wrote: ‘The crowds come to remember – but we should not be remembering only our own. It’s the inward-looking mood that lets Ukip thrive. But that’s probably an overinterpretation, because the spectacle of all these red poppies is emptier than that.

‘In spite of the mention of blood in its title, this is a deeply aestheticised, prettified and toothless war memorial.


Describing his preferred style of tribute, he wrote: ‘A meaningful mass memorial to this horror would not be dignified or pretty. It would be gory, vile and terrible to see. The moat of the Tower should be filled with barbed wire and bones. That would mean something.’

Social media users described the article as ridiculous, disrespectful and missing the point.
On Twitter, ‘Kemp1886’ said: ‘That Guardian article on the Poppy memorial is filth. Not remotely surprised though. No wonder circulation is so low.’

Sneering Guardian provokes anger after article calls poppy artwork 'Ukip-style memorial' and calls for ceramic flowers to be replaced with bones


Guardian published an article labeling the artwork as a 'Ukip-style memorial
Written by critic Jonathan Jones, he called it 'trite, fake and inward looking'

Armed forces charities accuse the article of trying to politicise the tribute
Says that the Tower of London's moat should be replaced with bones
Those on social media take to Twitter to describe the article as 'ridiculous'

By Jim Norton and Ben Wilkinson for the Daily Mail
29 October 2014
Daily Mail

The Guardian has provoked anger after publishing an article that labelled the poppy artwork a ‘UKIP-style memorial’.

Armed forces charities accused the left-wing newspaper of trying to politicise the tribute to those killed during the First World War.

They sprang to the defence of the installation, called Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, after the online article by a former Turner Prize judge described it as ‘trite, fake, and inward-looking’.


An aerial view of the Tower of London showing the poppy installation called Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red. The Guardian has provoked anger by publishing an article that labelled the artwork as a 'UKIP-style memorial'

In a provocative critique, author Jonathan Jones wrote: ‘The crowds come to remember – but we should not be remembering only our own. It’s the inward-looking mood that lets Ukip thrive. But that’s probably an overinterpretation, because the spectacle of all these red poppies is emptier than that.

‘In spite of the mention of blood in its title, this is a deeply aestheticised, prettified and toothless war memorial.

Describing his preferred style of tribute, he wrote: ‘A meaningful mass memorial to this horror would not be dignified or pretty. It would be gory, vile and terrible to see. The moat of the Tower should be filled with barbed wire and bones. That would mean something.’

Social media users described the article as ridiculous, disrespectful and missing the point.


In a provocative critique, former Turner Prize judge Jonathan Jones called it 'trite, fake and inward looking

And armed forces charities emphasised the way in which the artwork had caught the public’s imagination.

Help for Heroes said it would not dignify an article that ‘tried to politicise a memorial’ with a response.

A spokesman for armed forces charity SSAFA said: ‘The fact that hundreds of thousands of people have visited the installation to date, with many more expected as we head towards Remembrance, demonstrates how strongly the installation has resonated with the general public.’

A spokesman for the Historic Royal Palaces, which organised the memorial, said: ‘We have seen and read the article. It’s his opinion and we have nothing more to say about it. We’re just pleased with the way the public are responding to it – and that’s what’s more important to us.

‘We think it is incredibly evocative and we’ve seen people looking at it and being moved to tears just thinking about loved ones who died and the impact of war itself.’

Twitter user Jonny Wild wrote: ‘There are no words to express how disrespectful Jonathan Jones’ poppy article in the Guardian is – ridiculous piece of journalism.’

Journalist Ruth Green from Northern Ireland tweeted: ‘I saw the poppy installation last week. On so many levels Jonathan Jones has missed the point.’


But armed forces charities have emphasised the way in which the artwork has caught the public's imagination


Controversial: Sales of the left-wing newspaper, which was known as The Manchester Guardian from its founding in 1821 to 1959 and which is now based at Kings Place in London's Kings Cross, are dwindling

Another user, tweeting under the name ‘Kemp1886’, said: ‘That Guardian article on the Poppy memorial is filth. Not remotely surprised though. No wonder circulation is so low.’

The article was published on what is thought to have been a record day for visitors at the memorial so far, with police brought in to help control the crowds. Visitors yesterday reported long queues to catch a glimpse of the memorial, but most were pleased to see so many keen to pay their respects.

Sheila Bainbridge, 85, made the journey from Nottingham with her daughter, granddaughters and great-grandchildren.

The President of the Women’s Section of the Royal British Legion in Radcliffe-on-Trent, whose late husband Sgt Laurie Bainbridge fought for the Royal Air Force on D-Day and helped liberate the Belsen concentration camp, said the sight was worth the wait.

She said: ‘We don’t mind driving all the way down here and queuing to pay our respects.’ Undeterred by the crowds, her daughter Lynn Slater, 61, said: ‘It took us four hours to get here, we aren’t going to stop now.’

Visitor Angie Adriaanse, 65, from Wimbledon, south west London, told The Daily Mail: ‘I have never seen so many people.’

And one mum quipped: ‘I think the whole world has come today.’

Ray and Sue Smith, who travelled from Devizes, said it took them 30 minutes to get a good view. The couple said it was nice to see so many people take an interest, but Mr Smith, 68, said: ‘They are overwhelmed with crowds, they haven’t really planned how to cope.’


Millions of visitors have been to the installation including the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry

Retired property developer Graham Barnes, 88, who travelled from Henley-on-Thames, said: ‘(The display) is staggering, very moving, and a wonderful way of commemorating the number killed in that war.’ And he said the crowd did not surprise him, adding: ‘We are a patriotic nation.’

Adela Everiss, 34, from the London Borough of Hillingdon, said she would be returning with her family early on Saturday to avoid the crowd, adding: ‘It is just too busy.’ Hayes man Alan Hammond, 82, said: ‘It is a bit chaotic.’ While his wife Jane, 81, added: ‘It is lovely, it really is, but you do have a job to see it.’

The millions of visitors to the installation include the Queen two weeks ago and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in August.

Artist Mr Cummins, 37, yesterday revealed he had lost a finger making one of the poppies - which were sold for £25 each, to make a total of over £22.2 million for armed forces charities - when his hand was crushed by an industrial roller.

The artwork – entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red - has been slowly filling the moat around the Tower since July with the help of 8,000 volunteers. It is expected to raise more than £11million for charity before it is taken down the day after Armistice Day on November 11, when the final poppy is planted.

Read more: Guardian article on Tower of London poppy artwork provokes anger | Daily Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
Last edited by Blackleaf; Oct 29th, 2014 at 02:29 PM..
 
Blackleaf
#2
Thousands gathered to hear the Roll of Honour read out at the Tower of London poppy display on Monday night.

Each night at sunset, the Last Post is played and a Yeomen Warder (also known as a Beefeater) reads out the names of some of the British soldiers who gave their lives in the First World War.

With almost all of the 888,246 poppies now in place, the emotionally-charged Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red installation is only days away from completion.


Roll of Honour: Thousands gather under beautiful night skies at the Tower of London for ceremony calling out names of British soldiers who died in First World War

Roll of Honour ceremony takes place each evening at the Tower of London poppy display
Members of the public nominate a fallen soldier whose name is read out during the ceremony
Millions have visited the installation, and almost all of the 888,246 ceramic poppies are now in place

By Sara Malm for MailOnline
4 November 2014
Daily Mail

Thousands gathered to hear the Roll of Honour read out at the Tower of London poppy display on Monday night.

Each night at sunset, the Last Post is played and a Yeomen Warder reads out the names of some of the British soldiers who gave their lives in the First World War.

With almost all of the 888,246 poppies now in place, the emotionally-charged Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red installation is only days away from completion.


Honouring the dead: Crowds watch as the names of British soldiers who died in the First World War are read out by a Yeomen Warder at the Tower of London poppies


Roll of Honour: The ceremony takes place each evening after the Last Post has been played by a member of the British military


Lest we forget: Members of the public can nominate a member of the British forces who was killed in the First World War to have their name read out during the nightly Roll of Honour ceremony

Members of the public can nominate a member of the British forces who was killed in the First World War to have their name read out at the Tower during the nightly ceremony.


Millions have already visited the Tower of London to witness the incr edible sea of ceramic poppies which pay tribute to those who died fighting in the First World War.


In just over one week, the magnificent tribute to the British soldiers will be complete - each poppy a painful reminder of the monumental loss of human life suffered in the conflict.

The installation, called Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red is the brainchild of ceramic artist Paul Cummins, with setting by stage designer Tom Piper, and is predicted to raise around £11.2million for charity.


The installation will remain on display until Armistice Day on November 11, when the last poppy is planted.

Afterwards, they will be taken up and posted to their new owners after every single poppy was sold for £25 each to raise funds for military charities, including Help for Heroes and Combat Stress.

The very next day, the same army of 8,000 volunteers who began planting them on July 17 will remove each ceramic poppy individually, before sending it off to be washed and posted on to its new owner.


Pride of Britain: Millions have already travelled to the Tower of London to see the display, which will see 888,246 ceramic poppies placed on the Tower moat before November 11


Good cause: The installation, called Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, is predicted to raise around £11.2million for charity


Good work: After Armistice Day, each ceramic poppy will be removed by hand by the thousands of volunteers who helped install them


Read more: Thousands gather for ceremony naming soldiers died in First World War | Daily Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
 
Cannuck
+1
#3
What is it with the Brittish and silly hats?
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1 / -1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

What is it with the Brittish and silly hats?

A vain attempt to distract from their weak chins.

The Guardian is wrong. This is not at all a UKIP-style memorial. There's not a swastika anywhere.
 
Blackleaf
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

This is not at all a UKIP-style memorial. There's not a swastika anywhere.


Ukip are a right-wing party. Not a nasty left-wing one.

Nigel Farage wipes tears from his eyes as he visits poppy memorial

The Ukip leader becomes emotional as he looks at the First World War memorial at the Tower of London


One in the eye for the Guardianistas: Ukip leader Nigel Farage wipes his eyes while viewing the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation Photo: Rob Stothard/Getty Images


By Georgia Graham, Political Correspondent
04 Nov 2014
The Telegraph


Nigel Farage was overcome with emotion visiting the sea of remembrance poppies at the Tower of London.

The Ukip leader was pictured with tears in his eyes looking at the war memorial of hundreds of thousands of ceramic poppies which he described as a "humbling and awe-inspiring" tribute.

David Cameron last week praised the "stunning" memorial amid criticism of the display from a Guardian author who describe it as representing the "inward-looking mood that lets Ukip thrive."

Mr Cameron said the display was an "extremely poignant" reminder of Britain's casualties during the First World War.

Wearing his own large silk poppy Mr Farage was pictured visiting the memorial alongside hundreds of members of the public wiping tears from his eyes.

In the lead-up to Remembrance Day volunteers have been planting thousands of poppies in the lawn around the Tower of London to remember those who died in the First World War.

The memorial, which was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins includes 888,246 ceramic poppies which will progressively fill the Tower's moat. At the peak of the installation, which will be there until 11 November, is one poppy for each British fatality in the First World War.

The poppies will be sold off to the public with the profits going to a series of service charities.

Mr Cameron has said of the memorial: "It is a stunning display and it is extremely poignant," Mr Cameron replied.

"I think [it] reminds people of how many people gave their lives not just in that conflict, although obviously the slaughter was horrendous, but also in so many conflicts since then where our Armed Services personnel have been defending our freedoms and our way of life.

"And perhaps it's particularly poignant in this week when we think about the final troops returning from Afghanistan, we think of the 453 servicemen and women who were lost, and we also think of the many hundreds who are going to be living with life-changing injuries that we must make sure we look after for the rest of their lives."

Nigel Farage wipes tears from his eyes as he visits poppy memorial - Telegraph
 
DaSleeper
-1
#6
Crocodile tears???? all politicians do it......

Clinton leaving Ron Brown funeral - YouTube
 
Blackleaf
#7
The Daily Mail's brilliant Richard Littlejohn on the magnificent millions paying silent tribute at the Tower of London poppies installation and on the selfish Left-wing anarchists (including Russell Brand and Vivienne Westwood) who attended Guy Fawkes Night's "Million Mask March" by activists Anonymous:


The proof we live in two Britains: RICHARD LITTLEJOHN on the magnificent millions paying silent tribute at the Tower of London - while selfish anarchists bring chaos to the heart of the capital

By Richard Littlejohn for the Daily Mail
7 November 2014
Daily Mail

Four million people have visited the spectacular sea of ceramic poppies at the Tower of London, created to honour Britain’s war dead. And still they keep coming.

The Prime Minister has joined Boris Johnson in suggesting extending the exhibition beyond Armistice Day so that more people can pay their respects to the men and women who laid down their lives to protect our freedoms.

Crowds at the Tower have exceeded all expectations and, despite long queues, visitors have behaved with great dignity and decorum. Even though thousands of people file slowly past the moat at any given time, they deliver their tribute silently, becoming almost as integral to the occasion as the poppies themselves.


Four million people have visited the Tower of London tribute, but, just a few miles down the Thames, anarchists brought chaos to Westminster


Both the Prime Minister and Boris Johnson have joined the calls to extend the exhibition beyond Armistice Day

Incredible drone footage shows off Tower Bridge Poppies


Poppies Tower of LONDON 2014 Drone from the Sky 100 years Centenary - YouTube


"Despite the milling throng, everyone is afforded the opportunity for contemplation and reflection. Nigel Farage was reduced to tears and I have no doubt his reaction was genuine."


The huge attendance is also a powerful rebuke to the sneering Guardian newspaper, which contemptuously dismissed this poignant tribute as a ‘Ukip-style’ memorial.

Despite the milling throng, everyone is afforded the opportunity for contemplation and reflection. Nigel Farage was reduced to tears and I have no doubt his reaction was genuine.

I once had a similar experience watching a Remembrance Day parade after a church service in Sonning-on-Thames in Berkshire. Old soldiers in regimental blazers marched behind young cadets. I was overwhelmed by a sense of continuity and selfless duty being handed down the generations.

Like the millions who have travelled to the Tower in recent weeks, this was the best of Britain on parade. As a nation, we rise magnificently to these commemorations.

It was a reminder that the vanishing values and traditions I wrote about in my recent book, Littlejohn’s Lost World, are still out there if you care to look.


Despite the political upheavals foisted upon us by our self-obsessed, self-regarding, self-selecting political elite, Britain remains a small ‘c’ conservative nation. Most of us are quietly patriotic, have reverence for those who serve in our armed forces and respect for others, even when we disagree.

Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for elements of our political class. We are ruled by out-of-touch careerists who hold the opinions of the people who pay their salaries in utter contempt.

The BBC, which is supposed to serve the nation as a whole, delights in giving a megaphone to extremists, Left-wing bigots and pseudo revolutionaries.

Increasingly, it seems we live in two Britains. One, which contains the quiet majority, is solid, self-sufficient, intent on maintaining decent standards and doing the right thing.

The other, which is small but more voluble, is selfish, intolerant, attention-seeking and determined to rip up the old order.


Russell Brand turned up at the demo in Trafalgar Square, but he was not wearing the Guy Fawkes mask like other demonstrators from protest group Anonymous

While millions have been paying a silent tribute at the Tower, a rabble of attention-seeking soi-disant anarchists brought chaos to Westminster, a few miles along the Thames.

Demonstrators clashed with riot police, lobbed missiles, daubed graffiti and chanted: ‘One solution, revolution!’

Oh, for heaven’s sake, grow up.

Inevitably, the repulsive Russell Brand, darling of the BBC, turned up at the demo in Trafalgar Square on the latest leg of his rolling book tour. Needless to say, he wasn’t wearing the obligatory Guy Fawkes mask adopted by the protest group, Anonymous. Brand wasn’t looking for anonymity.

Perhaps he was hoping to get arrested, which would add to his street cred and shift a few more copies of his incoherent, semi-literate ‘manifesto’ to gullible students who see him as some kind of messiah.

Don’t forget that this sexually-incontinent ‘anti-capitalist’ hypocrite with a multi-million-dollar home in Hollywood and a history of serious illegal substance abuse was consulted as an ‘expert’ witness by MPs on the Commons Home Affairs Committee looking into the legalisation of drugs.

Also gracing the demo with her presence was that mad old bat Vivienne Westwood, who has amassed a fortune making daft frocks for women with more money than brains.

Observing this country from abroad might lead some to conclude that the likes of Brand and Westwood and their gormless band of acolytes are truly representative of modern Britain.

That would be as false an impression as dismissing all Americans as selfish, gun-toting, God-bothering crazies.

Sometimes that’s the conclusion Hollywood’s limousine liberals and the Left-leaning political class who dominate Washington would prefer you to form. Like our political class, they try to impose their own prejudices and agenda on an unwilling electorate.


Russell Brand made an appearance at the protest in Westminster before heading for night out at the theatre


Russell Brand criticises London Mayor Boris Johnson at Million Mask March:

Russell Brand criticises Boris Johnson at Million Mask March" - YouTube


Every few years, the voters bite back. When Barack Obama was elected, even many of those on the Right wished him well, as America’s first black President, who could unite the nation. But they have come to realise he’s just another aloof, Leftist elitist with barely disguised disdain for ordinary people.

This week, the U.S. voted in droves for conservative candidates. Republicans reaped the benefit of the revolt and now control both houses of Congress.

But there’s no great love for the Republican leadership, either. They’re seen in Middle America as part of the problem, not the solution. It is why younger politicians such as Florida’s Marco Rubio, Texan Ted Cruz and Kentucky’s Rand Paul are now being talked up as potential presidential candidates.

All are original thinkers who enjoy the support of the Tea Party, the popular grassroots movement which arose in disgust at the antics of the political establishment.

Like Ukip, the Tea Party is caricatured as a bunch of racists hankering for the past.

There are undoubtedly a few of those on both sides of the Atlantic.

But on a visit to the U.S. a couple of years ago, I went to a Tea Party rally out of curiosity to hear Rubio speak. There were 5,000 people in the audience. They weren’t the mythical, cousin-marrying, cross-burning hillbillies portrayed by the mainstream media both here and in the U.S.

I met lawyers, small businessmen, teachers and stay-at-home mums, all concerned about the impact spendthrift policies pushed by professional politicians was having on their families and their future prosperity.

In Britain, they’d all be Daily Mail readers: the decent type who would once have been the backbone of the Conservative Party, many of whom are now venting their disillusion by flirting with Ukip.

They are the kind of people who would travel miles to view the poppy memorial at the Tower of London, not flock to a Russell Brand show.

According to the latest polls, those who say they will vote either Conservative or Ukip is just short of 60 per cent. Labour is languishing at barely half that level and there are demands among Labour MPs for Ed Miliband to stand down.

More than three-quarters (78 per cent) of Tory deserters to Ukip say they want a Conservative government. Cameron could win them back with a robust, traditional Tory manifesto.

Instead, he seems obsessed with pandering to the fringe political prejudices of single-issue lobbyists and the kind of nutcases prepared to listen to Brand.

And because of the unfairness of our electoral system, thanks to the stubborn refusal of that pygmy Nick Clegg to honour the Lib Dems’ coalition promise to re-draw constituency boundaries, the hapless, hopeless Miliband could still stumble over the line into No 10.

Britain may remain a small ‘c’ conservative country, two-thirds of us may want a Tory government, but frighteningly we’re sliding towards a minority Left-wing Labour government with a neon-lit capital ‘L’.


Read more: RICHARD LITTLEJOHN: The proof we live in two Britains* | Daily Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2 / -1
#8
Well, I favour the BNP-Lite policy of mandatory patriotism, suppression of freedom of speech, thought, and religion, and harsh punishment of anyone who doesn't drool with adoration of the Shiny Hat.
 
Blackleaf
#9
The Left sneered. But these poppies reconnect us to a generation of heroes we never knew, writes ROBERT HARDMAN


By Robert Hardman for the Daily Mail
8 November 2014
Daily Mail

Quote:

As for any talk of a ‘Ukip-style memorial’? It only goes to show how little the Left understands the real world.

The Left-wing arts establishment, which chucks millions at pointless tat providing it ticks the relevant politically correct boxes, failed to see the point of this. Shame on them all

This dazzling ceramic display has become the perfect riposte to today’s vapid, tokenistic, ‘me, me, me’ mindset, typified by those fatuous feminist T-shirts which public figures must wear for fear of being labelled sexist. Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg, has not yet found time to visit the poppies, but he has felt obliged to pose for the cameras in a T-shirt saying: ‘This is what a feminist looks like’, and also gormlessly chop carrots on a day-time TV cookery slot.

The last time a crowd this huge stood here in total silence, they had come to see the Jacobite rebel, Lord Lovat, lose his head.

There were no stewards in hi-viz jackets back in 1747. In fact, 20 spectators died when a grandstand collapsed ahead of what would be the last public execution on Tower Hill.

The atmosphere’s entirely different today but there is unquestionably the same sense of history, the same formidable symbol of Crown authority, the sombre multitude staring intently, the sea of red...


Pensioner Albert Willis, 79, former Grenadier Guard and a serving Grenadier Guard among the poppies


Families and day-trippers flock to the Blood Swept Lands and Sea of art installation at the Tower of London

For what started out as an eccentric artistic exercise just three months ago, is now something truly historic.

It’s not just that millions of people from all around the world have turned up to marvel at a work of modern art which can reduce grown men to tears, or that the leaders of all the main parties are in agreement about something — they all want next week’s scheduled poppy harvest to be postponed.

The Tower of London’s 2014 poppy installation is no longer just a tribute to each one of the 888,246 British troops who died in the Great War.

It’s become a monument to the way the British view themselves: dutiful, patient, original, compassionate and mindful of the past without being rooted in it.

And whatever happens to these poppies, an important public space which has sat largely empty since the days of William the Conqueror is now destined to be a national commemorative focal point for the foreseeable future.

This dazzling ceramic display has become the perfect riposte to today’s vapid, tokenistic, ‘me, me, me’ mindset, typified by those fatuous feminist T-shirts which public figures must wear for fear of being labelled sexist.

Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg, has not yet found time to visit the poppies, but he has felt obliged to pose for the cameras in a T-shirt saying: ‘This is what a feminist looks like’, and also gormlessly chop carrots on a day-time TV cookery slot.

No one is obliging anyone to visit the Tower of London. And there is no snappy catchphrase attached to these poppies.

But their unspoken message hits you like a sledgehammer the moment you clap eyes on the vermilion tide: ‘This is what a lost generation looks like.’


What started out as an eccentric artistic exercise just three months ago, is now something truly historic

It was little more than a year ago that the ceramic artist, Paul Cummins, had the idea of crafting a clay poppy for every fallen soldier, planting the whole lot at the Tower of London and then selling them for charity.

He called it Blood Swept Lands And Seas Of Red, words written on the will of a soldier from his native Derbyshire who died in Flanders. But, first, he had to convince the Tower.

Some public organisations would probably still be holding committee meetings one year later, chewing over the health and safety implications. But the Tower authorities — a purposeful mix of distinguished old soldiers and hard-headed tourism experts — quickly grasped the idea.

The award-winning theatrical designer, Tom Piper, was recruited to bring the vision to life. A factory was set up in Derby and 50 unemployed locals hired to make the poppies, while two specialist potteries, in Warwickshire and Stoke, were also invited to help.

Rebuffed in his attempts to raise any support from Government and the usual arts bodies (how silly they look now), Paul Cummins had to take out a £1 million high-interest loan just to bring his idea to life.

He has certainly suffered for his art. Early on, he lost a middle finger rolling out a new batch of poppies.

Neither he nor anyone else envisaged quite how this would turn out when the first poppy was planted last July by Yeoman Sergeant Crawford Butler.


It was little more than a year ago that the ceramic artist, Paul Cummins, had the idea of crafting a clay poppy for every fallen soldier

The number of spectators has now soared past that much-quoted original estimate of four million. Historic Royal Palaces, the charity which runs the Tower (without a bean from the taxpayer), has already spent £120,000 on stewards and safety hoardings to manage the thousands who keep pouring forth from Tower Hill Underground station.

But it is not just the crowds along the walls which have been remarkable. There is an equally impressive human story in the moat.

For this project has now attracted some 30,000 volunteers. That is almost half the number for the entire 2012 London Olympics. And they are vital because it has required a citizen army to plant nearly a million poppies in a matter of weeks. Another one will be needed in the weeks ahead to uproot them all and send the same poppies on their way to the people who have paid £25 for each one.

I turn up to find an afternoon shift of 200 volunteers putting on red bibs for a three-hour stint in a corner of the Eastern moat, the last area of grass still untouched.

Some are pensioners, some students. Ten chaps have taken a day off from the Food Standards Agency. Here, too, are half a dozen bikers in Hell’s Angels leather waistcoats.

They turn out to be members of the Royal British Legion Riders Branch and have done several shifts.

‘The hardest thing is getting the bits on the rods,’ explains former Private Claire Thompson, 41, from Uxbridge. ‘Last time, I had blisters for weeks!’


That sniffy Guardian critic who dismissed this project as an inward-looking ‘Ukip-style memorial’ really did get it wrong

For these poppies do not come ready-made. As every person who has bought one is about to discover, they actually come in six pieces — a hand-crafted, scarlet-glazed head (made of two folds of clay), a 440mm steel rod, two rubber washers and two plastic ‘spacers’ which protect the clay from the steel and hold the head in place.

The poppy must then be gently hammered in to the grass. When the display comes down, each one will be dismantled for safe delivery. The new owners must then reassemble them (an instruction manual is included with the certificate of authenticity).

‘It’s funny to think that just three months ago we were thinking about advertising this,’ says Colonel John Brown, the Deputy Governor of the Tower. The main man on the ground, he spent his military career in the Royal Logistic Corps, appropriately enough.

In between briefing the volunteers, he has to handle the growing numbers of VIPs wanting a tour of the site.

‘We’ve adopted what we call an “informal visit” strategy,’ he explains.

Staff are simply too busy to arrange VIP cordons and red carpets. Just this week, requests from two overseas royal families were politely turned down because there was no way of getting their motorcades through the crowds. Among those who has made her own way down here this afternoon is the actress Joan Collins.

I drop in at poppy-planting HQ, a set of windowless store rooms beneath Tower Bridge. There’s a large map of the world on the wall. New volunteers are asked to stick a red dot on their home town, and they come from every continent. Some are from Germany. Many are from the United States.

‘We had some American Vietnam veterans who were very moved by it all,’ says Col Brown. That sniffy Guardian critic who dismissed this project as an inward-looking ‘Ukip-style memorial’ really did get it wrong.

Elsewhere, the Historic Royal Palaces staff are arranging this evening’s Roll Call, another major operation in itself. Every day since this display began, a Beefeater and a bugler appear at dusk and march out to a little mound in the middle of the poppies. They escort a guest who will read out 180 names from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s register of the dead.

Anyone can propose a name online. But each one must be checked against the Commission’s database to ensure that they are bona fide and that they have not already been included.

Then an email is despatched to the person who sent in the nomination, alerting them to the date and time when the name will be read out.

Every night, entire families have been turning up to hear a great-grandfather or great-uncle being honoured. Earlier this week, one Roll Call included the entire list of war dead from Clare College, Cambridge. A century on, many are finding it a profoundly moving experience.

‘We get very emotional thank-you messages from all over the world,’ says Melanie McCarthy of the Tower’s IT department. ‘They all like to tell us the story of their loved one and how proud they are.’ Tomorrow night’s Roll Call, for example, will include names off the war memorials in the Yorkshire villages of Conisbrough and Denaby. Many proud villagers are making the long journey to London just to hear these gallant long-lost Yorkshire lads being acknowledged — and on Remembrance Sunday, too. They will remember it for the rest of their lives.

Any Allied soldier can be nominated, not just the Brits. Many of the names are from Canadian, Australian and Kiwi units. The Tower films every ceremony and puts it all on the website. The Roll Call lasts around 20 minutes but it feels longer as this remorseless litany of sacrifice goes on and on.

It’s only a tiny fraction, of course. If you actually tried to read out the name of every dead soldier from Britain alone and worked around the clock, you would still be going strong three months later.

It’s humbling for everyone. Dame Helen Mirren is no stranger to the big occasion. When she stood among the poppies to read the names a few weeks ago, even her crisp delivery faltered now and then.

Many passers-by have no idea that this beautiful, newly fabricated ‘ritual’ takes place every night. Some are soon in tears. At 4.55pm, the floodlights on the moat are dimmed and a spotlight picks out the little mound. The crowds, vast as ever, shuffle to a standstill. Not a single mobile phone goes off. Down in the moat, I bump in to the Constable of the Tower, General Lord Dannatt, former Chief of the General Staff, who championed the poppy idea at the very start.

As usual, he and Lady Dannatt have brought a few special guests to watch the ceremony. This evening’s contingent include a group of badly wounded Afghanistan veterans and Victoria Maclennan, aged nine, from Fair Oak Junior School in Hampshire, who has asked to interview the man in charge of the Tower for her school magazine. They are all bowled over.

‘This means a lot, I can tell you, says Martyn Compton, 30, of East Sussex, a former Household Cavalry Lance Corporal who knows more than most about serving one’s country. He suffered 75 per cent burns and was shot twice in Afghanistan in 2006.


The arts establishment, which chucks millions at pointless tat providing it ticks the relevant politically correct boxes, failed to see the point of this. Shame on them all

Making the ceramic Tower of London poppies:

Making the ceramic poppies for display at Tower of London - YouTube

Lord Dannatt tells me that he can pinpoint the exact moment when this whole adventure suddenly took off. ‘It was October 16, as the Queen walked through the early poppies in the moat,’ he says. ‘Suddenly, that image went viral round the world. People understood why there were a specific number of poppies and that there was a finite opportunity to see them.

‘Four days later, every single poppy had been sold.’

Like the rest of the population, he is now kicking himself. ‘I did buy one at the start and meant to get some more,’ he laughs. ‘But when I got round to it, they’d all gone!’

Once tonight’s names have been read out, the bugler marches on to the mound and plays the Last Post.

There is a terrific flash of mobile phone cameras and polite applause at the end. Then the crowds shuffle on and thousands more come pouring out of the Tube station.

Quite apart from the growing debate about extending this display, there is another question: what next? There have already been several suggestions for 2018. But it won’t be like this. ‘

It’s been overwhelming — in a very nice way,’ says the artist, Paul Cummins. ‘But you won’t see me doing any more ceramic poppies in the moat.’

Having been down here several times, I am reminded of John F Kennedy’s old adage that ‘victory has a hundred fathers and defeat is an orphan’.

The organisers are too diplomatic to say so in public, but when all this started, they wondered if help might be forthcoming from the Government’s special £65 million pot for Great War commemorations. Nothing doing, said the officials.

Similarly, the arts establishment, which chucks millions at pointless tat providing it ticks the relevant politically correct boxes, failed to see the point of this. Shame on them all. Particularly as it’s been such an expensive business setting up a production line, a workforce, a call centre, a website and so on.

The primary purpose, of course, was to produce a work of art rather than conduct a fund-raising exercise. Yet the costs have been covered, the artists have waived any profits and at least 40 per cent of every poppy will be shared between six charities.

Now that the Chancellor has scrapped much of the VAT involved (George Osborne also invited Paul Cummins round to Downing Street this week for a congratulatory cup of tea), the final sum will be just short of £10 million, a magnificent achievement.

But the greater achievement is that we have reconnected with a generation we never knew, found a new arena for national thanksgiving and, along the way, learned something about ourselves.

As for any talk of a ‘Ukip-style memorial’? It only goes to show how little the Left understands the real world.

Read more: Tower of London poppies reconnect us to a generation of heroes we never knew | Daily Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
************************************************** **************************


Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Well, I favour the BNP-Lite policy of mandatory patriotism, suppression of freedom of speech, thought, and religion, and harsh punishment of anyone who doesn't drool with adoration of the Shiny Hat.

Why DO the Left despise patriotism? Sneering Left-wing art critic brands the poppy tribute seen by millions at the Tower as a 'Ukip-type memorial'

Temporary war memorial Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red at Tower of London has attracted thousands of visitors
Installation will see 888,246 ceramic poppies filling Tower's moat to commemorate those who died in First World War

But Guardian art critic Jonathan Jones has trashed the 'toothless' memorial as 'fake', 'inward-looking' and 'a lie'

In a seething attack, the former Turner Prize judge suggests the moat should be filled with 'barbed wire and bones'

By Robert Hardman for the Daily Mail
30 October 2014
Daily Mail


The work, created by Paul Cummins, is to simply express thanks to those who made the ultimate sacrifice - without political agenda

Why is it that the Left have such a loathing for home-grown patriotism while they are so keen to salute it elsewhere? Why is it still thought to be cool (after all these years) to have that clapped-out hero of the Cuban revolution, Che Guevara, on your wall or your T-shirt, while decrying ‘Thatcher the warmonger’ for liberating the Falklands?

Even among the centre Left, there is sometimes a sense that all this commemoration stuff is a bit phoney. Tony Blair saw nothing wrong with merging the 60th anniversaries of VE Day and VJ Day in 2005 into a single, non-specific event to save time and money. The veterans were appalled, yet the Prime Minister of the day could not understand why.

Back in the Seventies, the Left were urging us all to ‘move on’ and downgrade Armistice Day. In 1982, after the Falklands War, the BBC decided to switch conductors after musical director Mark Elder had called for the abolition of ‘jingoistic’ flag-waving at the Last Night of the Proms. Even today, there are strident voices insisting that the school curriculum should no longer teach 1918 as a ‘victory’.

And nothing gets this Leftie lot going quite like a poppy.


The sea of crimson poppies can be seen from The View From The Shard - a beacon of colour in the more grey London surroundings

Whether it’s the right-on crowd who insist on wearing white poppies (to honour pacifism) in the run-up to Remembrance Sunday or those, like Channel 4’s Jon Snow, who refuse to wear one at all (on grounds of ‘poppy fascism’), there will always be some people who want to be different.

No one should dispute their right to do so. Such freedoms of expression are why those wars were fought in the first place. Even the protester who burnt poppies in front of Royal British Legion fundraisers outside the Royal Albert Hall on Armistice Day 2010 — shouting ‘Burn in hell, British soldiers’ — was only fined £50 for threatening behaviour (he’d have been fined more if he’d parked on a double yellow line while doing so).

But that doesn’t mean we should let patronising side-swipes pass unchallenged.

So what if the sea of poppies at the Tower is a British commemoration? Every nation honours the dead in its own way. Think of the profoundly moving tradition which takes place every night of every year in Belgium.

Why is it that the Left have such a loathing for home-grown patriotism?

Except for the duration of the Second World War, the buglers of the Ypres Fire Brigade have appeared each evening at the town’s Menin Gate. There, the traffic stops and the people of this proud town salute all the British who fell in Flanders. To date, I have never heard anyone condemn them as a bunch of Ukip-supporting simpletons. Maybe it’s only a matter of time.

The Tower of London project was dreamt up by ceramicist Paul Cummins only a year ago, as he pondered a fitting tribute for the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War. His idea was to plant a ceramic poppy for every British and colonial serviceman who died in the Great War, then sell them to raise funds for charities linked to the Armed Forces. The trustees of Historic Royal Palaces, which runs the Tower of London, quickly embraced the idea.

More than that, the Tower authorities have created a ritual whereby, every night, the names of dead soldiers are recited from a lectern overlooking the poppies. Anyone can nominate a loved one.

The whole project is an idea which so impressed the Queen that she asked for a guided tour. And despite Jonathan Jones’s assertion that it is a nationalistic, Brits-only affair, it has attracted enormous international attention.

The man from the Guardian had not even planned to see it. ‘I accidentally got swept into a tide of humanity at the weekend, or to put it another way, couldn’t move for crowds,’ he wrote. ‘What was going on? Why were so many people choking the streets of the City of London, where shops are closed on Saturdays?’ How frightful for the poor chap.

Well, I just so happened to be down there myself during this same weekend. I saw the poppies back in the summer and wanted to bring my children before the whole thing disappears in a fortnight. And I could think of no better way to impress upon them the enormity of the Great War than to show them this crimson moat and explain that every single one of the 888,246 poppies equals a real person who lived and died for this country.

It is an image which will be imprinted on countless young minds for many years to come. Yet after Armistice Day on November 11, the poppies will be uprooted, cleaned and dispatched to the people who have paid £25 for each one. Within weeks, this extraordinary display will be gone, unlike Damien Hirst’s pickled shark and Tracey Emin’s unmade bed, which will for better or worse live on to delight future generations.

Which, though, will most people remember 100 years from now?


Her Majesty looked contemplative as she toured the poppies last month. The poppies will be sold to raise money for military charities

In stirring scenes, Joey, the star of War Horse, also visited the poppies - one of several high profile visitors to the installation

Visitors have been taking photos in their thousands to document the snippet of history now laid out in central London


Read more: Jonathan Jones brands the Tower of London poppy tribute as a 'Ukip-type memorial' | Daily Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Last edited by Blackleaf; Nov 8th, 2014 at 08:17 AM..
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2 / -1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The Left sneered. But these poppies reconnect us to a generation of heroes we never knew, writes ROBERT HARDMAN

Read that again. ". . . reconnect us to a generation of heroes we never knew."

Complete semantic absurdity.
 
Blackleaf
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Read that again. ". . . reconnect us to a generation of heroes we never knew."

Complete semantic absurdity.


You and your fellow Lefties aren't even fit to spit polish these British heroes' boots. These great men died in order for you to spew out your vile, Left-wing bile. Disgraceful. You remind me of Michael Foot standing at the Cenotaph on Remembrance Sunday in 1981 wearing a donkey jacket.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2 / -1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

You and your fellow Lefties aren't even fit to spit polish these British heroes' boots. These great men died in order for you to spew out your vile, Left-wing bile. Disgraceful. You remind me of Michael Foot standing at the Cenotaph on Remembrance Sunday in 1981 wearing a donkey jacket.

You and your fellow illiterates aren't even fit to speak their language. You remind me of the average BNP hooligan puking into the street on Saturday night.
 
Nuggler
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

You and your fellow Lefties aren't even fit to spit polish these British heroes' boots. These great men died in order for you to spew out your vile, Left-wing bile. Disgraceful. You remind me of Michael Foot standing at the Cenotaph on Remembrance Sunday in 1981 wearing a donkey jacket.

Well, as long as Mike was doing it in a respectful manner.............................

But yer right as rain old chap. These leftits are way out in leftfield. Hope no one firebombs the Guardian.

Someone should tell queenie to stay the fukk outa the fleurs...........cows trample you know.


--------------------
WTF is........... The Grauniad
?
"
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#14
Thanks for the reddie, Blackleaf. It shows that you've lost the exchange when you degenerate into complete inarticulacy. Not that it's a long slip for you.

Nice try, though.
 
Blackleaf
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

You and your fellow illiterates aren't even fit to speak their language. You remind me of the average BNP hooligan puking into the street on Saturday night.

You remind me of the average UAF scum, marching with their Islamist buddies and shouting obscene and disgusting abuse against EDL national heroes who are taking part in peaceful parades against Islamists and the Islamification of Britain, but which are no longer peaceful because you lot have turned up on the scene shouting your vile abuse against people you hate because they are white patriots.

Left-wing pond scum like you should neither be seen nor be heard.

Quote: Originally Posted by Nuggler View Post

Hope no one firebombs the Guardian.
"

I hope somebody does firebomb The Grauniad. And Al-Bibisiyah, too.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post


Left-wing pond scum like you should neither be seen nor be heard.

Yes, you've already articulated the UKIP's hostility to freedom of speech, freedom of thought, freedom of religion, and the other traditional freedoms of the British people.

And yet you claim you're not fascists. Go figure.
 
Blackleaf
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Yes, you've already articulated the UKIP's hostility to freedom of speech, freedom of thought, freedom of religion, and the other traditional freedoms of the British people.

Ukip isn't against any of those things. That's just you and your weird way of thinking. We all know it's the LEFT that are opposed to those things. And as we all know, anyone who doesn't agree with the Left's policies of "multiculturalism", "diversity", "'LGBT' rights," the state's controlling of people's lives, the EU, the Islamification of the West, anti-Semitism, anti-Israel, and green taxes etc etc etc is a "fascist" to the Left. So, basically, that's most people.

Quote:

And yet you claim you're not fascists. Go figure.

The reason why Ukip claim the're not fascists is because they aren't. As I say, though, as a typical Lefty who has no grasp of real life everybody who disagrees with your out-of-touch views is considered by you to be a "fascist."

 
Tecumsehsbones
+2
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Ukip isn't against any of those things. That's just you and your weird way of thinking. We all know it's the LEFT that are opposed to those things. And as we all know, anyone who doesn't agree with the Left's policies of "multiculturalism", "diversity", "'LGBT' rights," the state's controlling of people's lives, the EU, the Islamification of the West, anti-Semitism, anti-Israel, and green taxes etc etc etc is a "fascist" to the Left. So, basically, that's most people.

Um. . . you do realise that your bizarre fantasies of "coming to get" those who disagree with you is fascist repression of free thought, free speech, and freedom of religion, right?

Or maybe not. I doubt if you have the basal IQ to understand the concept.
 
darkbeaver
#19


I hope we would all be horrified to learn what her little visits to these blood fields signify.
 
Blackleaf
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Um. . . you do realise that your bizarre fantasies of "coming to get" those who disagree with you is fascist repression of free thought, free speech, and freedom of religion, right?

Or maybe not. I doubt if you have the basal IQ to understand the concept.

I'll say again: It is the LEFT which is curtailing free thought, free speech and freedom of religion, not the Right, and that the Left sees anyone who disagrees with their bizarre and unpopular views as "fascists."

Don't agree with "multiculturalism?" You're a fascist.

Don't agree with unchecked immigration, which is putting a strain on schools, transport, housing and the NHS? You're a fascist.

You hate the EU and think that Britain should leave right now? You're a fascist.

Don't religiously follow every depraved, loony utterance of The Graun, Al-Bibisiyah and Tecumsehbones? You're a fascist.

You don't vote Labour, LibDems or Greens? You're a fascist.

Want to get rid of green taxes which are making our energy bills expensive? You're a fascist.

You hate Islamofascism? Fascist!

You wear a poppy every November and visit a "Ukip-style war memorial"? Filthy, Far-Right fascist!

Basically, you only see Ukip as fascist because they're a popular party with popular views who disagree with you and your fellow Lefties' bizarre, out-of-touch Left-wing view of the world which has no basis whatsoever in reality and commonsense. So, to you, they're "fascists." But they aren't fascists to most ordinary people on the street.

 
WLDB
+3
#21  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post


I hope somebody does firebomb The Grauniad. And Al-Bibisiyah, too.

Advocating terrorism eh.
 
SLM
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by WLDB View Post

Advocating terrorism eh.

He's an angry, angry little man.

A bit whiny too actually.
 
damngrumpy
+1
#23
The problem is we live in an open democracy and some people don't like that
The followers of Islam get upset all the time. Now a newspaper has been
critical of an institution of the military and the Conservatives are up in arms.
I think is was offensive too but hey its an open democracy and that gives me the
right to be offended
Its not the end of the world it was an opposite poiintof view nothing more.
 
Blackleaf
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by SLM View Post

He's an angry, angry little man.

Too right I am. That's why I'll be voting Ukip in 2015. Enough is now enough.

Quote: Originally Posted by WLDB View Post

Advocating terrorism eh.


One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter.
 
WLDB
+2
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post



One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter.

Yes, you are so oppressed by a newspaper.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Basically, you only see Ukip as fascist because they're a popular party with popular views who disagree with you and your fellow Lefties' bizarre, out-of-touch Left-wing view of the world which has no basis whatsoever in reality and commonsense. So, to you, they're "fascists." But they aren't fascists to most ordinary people on the street.

No, imbecile. As I've said several times, your silly fantasies about how you're "coming to get" people who disagree with you make it clear that you oppose freedom of speech, thought, and religion. That, slow child, is what makes you a fascist.
 
Blackleaf
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

No, imbecile. As I've said several times, your silly fantasies about how you're "coming to get" people who disagree with you make it clear that you oppose freedom of speech, thought, and religion. That, slow child, is what makes you a fascist.


No, my little dearie. It is the LEFT who oppose freedom of speech, freedom of thought and freedom of religion, and label as "fascists" anybody who disagrees with them, as you are doing now. Now I've said this several times. Now I want you to read what I've said several times so that it sinks in.
 
SLM
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by WLDB View Post

Yes, you are so oppressed by a newspaper.


Well I think his feelings were hurt.
 
El Barto
+2
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

No, imbecile. As I've said several times, your silly fantasies about how you're "coming to get" people who disagree with you make it clear that you oppose freedom of speech, thought, and religion. That, slow child, is what makes you a fascist.

There is an expression I heard not too long ago ... he's been rocked way to close to the wall when he was a baby
 
Goober
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Um. . . you do realise that your bizarre fantasies of "coming to get" those who disagree with you is fascist repression of free thought, free speech, and freedom of religion, right?

Or maybe not. I doubt if you have the basal IQ to understand the concept.

Well Mr. T - Blackhead has snapped and the puss bucket of hatred is running.
Good job.