They once ruled all of Egypt, but the Khush Pharaohs have been overlooked


Blackleaf
+1
#1  Top Rated Post
When you think of pharaohs, does your mind conjure up Tutankhamun and the Valley of the Kings, Cleopatra and the pyramids of Giza? If so, you need to think again.

Because the greatest of all pharaohs was not from Egypt...

The forgotten black pharaohs: They once ruled all of Egypt, but Africa's Khush Pharaohs have been overlooked, says a new show


Channel 4 documentary examines the history of 'Black Pharaohs' living in Kush

Taharqa controlled more territory by volume than any other in Egyptian history

There has been denial that black Africans could build such a powerful kingdom

Lost Pharaohs Of The Nile recounts how Kush flourished from 1,000BC to 350BC

By Harry Wallop For Weekend Magazine
4 October 2019

When you think of pharaohs, does your mind conjure up Tutankhamun and the Valley of the Kings, Cleopatra and the pyramids of Giza? If so, you need to think again.

Because the greatest of all pharaohs was not from Egypt.

He was called Taharqa and came from the Kingdom of Kush in what is now Sudan.

'He ruled everything from what is today Khartoum all the way down the Nile through Egypt to the Mediterranean,' says Pearce Paul Creasman, professor of anthropology at the University of Arizona.


Channel 4 documentary Lost Pharaohs Of The Nile recounts 'Black Pharaohs' living in The Kingdom of Kush including Taharqa (pictured leading a festival)


'The territory he controlled was probably more by volume than at any other time in Egyptian history.'

The story of Taharqa and the other 'Black Pharaohs' from Kush is told in a fascinating Channel 4 documentary, Lost Pharaohs Of The Nile.

They were not the pale-skinned Egyptians we associate with pharaohs, but black Africans.

And they were just as powerful and sophisticated as their northerly neighbours.

The Kingdom of Kush flourished from around 1,000BC to 350BC, more recently than the more famous pharaohs Tutankhamun and Ramses II, who ruled before 1,000BC in Egypt.

During the Kush period, the two kingdoms vied for power, and between about 760BC and 650BC, notably during the reign of Taharqa, the Black Pharaohs controlled all of Egypt and Kush.


Rachael Dann (pictured) of the University of Copenhagen, explores the burial chamber of Queen Qalhata, wife of one of Taharqa's predecessors

Yet they've been overlooked throughout history, and the programme follows historians and archaeologists working in Sudan who are determined to restore their reputation.

'There was persistent denial that black Africans could have built a powerful civilisation worthy of the same attention and respect as Egypt,' says Geoff Emberling, archaeologist at the University of Michigan.

Yet the ancient Kush city of Meroë boasts more pyramids than in all of Egypt.

Taharqa's pyramid is at the royal necropolis of Nuri, and although it has been explored already, there is another pyramid, or a burial chamber deep beneath it, that has yet to be fully explored.

It is completely flooded by the waters of the Nile, and the documentary follows Professor Creasman and his team as they dive to explore what lies beneath the murky waters.


Professor Creasman and his team explore a burial chamber beneath Taharqa's pyramid at the royal necropolis of Nuri. pictured: The Royal Pyramids of Meroe, Kush's third capital

'As far as I am aware no one has dived a tomb anywhere in the world before, and certainly no one has dived a pyramid,' says Professor Creasman.

The first bucket they pulled up brought with it shards of Kush pottery and gold leaf, suggesting great treasures could lie beneath.

Indeed, Prof Creasman is certain there is a sarcophagus with the remains of King Nastasen, who ruled the Kingdom of Kush between 335BC and 315BC.

The professor intends to return next year to find out more.

But he – and all the other experts working in Sudan, including Rachael Dann of the University of Copenhagen, who is exploring the burial chamber of Queen Qalhata, wife of one of Taharqa's predecessors – will have a race against the clock.

There are plans to build hydroelectric dams which could flood important sites, as the building of the Aswan Dam in Egypt in the 1960s caused sites there to be destroyed.

Just as the kingdom of the Black Pharaohs is being rediscovered, much of it could soon be lost.

Lost Pharaohs Of The Nile, 13 October, 8pm, Ch4.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/a...-new-show.html
 
Curious Cdn
#2
We don't talk about Pharaohs of Colour on this forum.
 
Danbones
#3
No, you are too busy defending pedo crooks, and illegal immigrant gang members, and taking guns from law abiding citizens, while giving them to those crooks and gang members, to talk about fallacious archaeology.


Were the ancient Egyptians black or white? Scientists now know
This is the first successful DNA sequencing on ancient Egyptian mummies, ever.

The problem, it was thought, is that mummy DNA couldn’t be sequenced. But a group of international researchers, using unique methods, have overcome the barriers to do just that. They found that the ancient Egyptians were most closely related to the peoples of the Near East, particularly from the Levant. This is the Eastern Mediterranean which today includes the countries of Turkey, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon. The mummies used were from the New Kingdom and a later period, (a period later than the Middle Kingdom) when Egypt was under Roman rule.

Modern Egyptians share 8% of their genome with central Africans, far more than ancient ones, according to the study, published in the journal Nature Communications. The influx of Sub-Saharan genes only occurred within the last 1,500 years. This could be attributed to the trans-Saharan slave trade or just from regular, long distance trade between the two regions. Improved mobility on the Nile during this period increased trade with the interior, researchers claim.
https://bigthink.com/philip-perry/we...tists-now-know
Last edited by Danbones; Oct 6th, 2019 at 06:58 PM..
 
Curious Cdn
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

No, you are too busy defending pedo crooks, and illegal immigrant gang members, and taking guns from law abiding citizens, while giving them to those crooks and gang members, to talk about fallacious archaeology.
Were the ancient Egyptians black or white? Scientists now know
This is the first successful DNA sequencing on ancient Egyptian mummies, ever.
The problem, it was thought, is that mummy DNA couldn’t be sequenced. But a group of international researchers, using unique methods, have overcome the barriers to do just that. They found that the ancient Egyptians were most closely related to the peoples of the Near East, particularly from the Levant. This is the Eastern Mediterranean which today includes the countries of Turkey, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon. The mummies used were from the New Kingdom and a later period, (a period later than the Middle Kingdom) when Egypt was under Roman rule.
Modern Egyptians share 8% of their genome with central Africans, far more than ancient ones, according to the study, published in the journal Nature Communications. The influx of Sub-Saharan genes only occurred within the last 1,500 years. This could be attributed to the trans-Saharan slave trade or just from regular, long distance trade between the two regions. Improved mobility on the Nile during this period increased trade with the interior, researchers claim.
https://bigthink.com/philip-perry/we...tists-now-know


http://youtu.be/YTY26k0CA0I
 
Mowich
+1
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

When you think of pharaohs, does your mind conjure up Tutankhamun and the Valley of the Kings, Cleopatra and the pyramids of Giza? If so, you need to think again.

Because the greatest of all pharaohs was not from Egypt...

The forgotten black pharaohs: They once ruled all of Egypt, but Africa's Khush Pharaohs have been overlooked, says a new show


Channel 4 documentary examines the history of 'Black Pharaohs' living in Kush

Taharqa controlled more territory by volume than any other in Egyptian history

There has been denial that black Africans could build such a powerful kingdom

Lost Pharaohs Of The Nile recounts how Kush flourished from 1,000BC to 350BC

By Harry Wallop For Weekend Magazine
4 October 2019

When you think of pharaohs, does your mind conjure up Tutankhamun and the Valley of the Kings, Cleopatra and the pyramids of Giza? If so, you need to think again.

Because the greatest of all pharaohs was not from Egypt.

He was called Taharqa and came from the Kingdom of Kush in what is now Sudan.

'He ruled everything from what is today Khartoum all the way down the Nile through Egypt to the Mediterranean,' says Pearce Paul Creasman, professor of anthropology at the University of Arizona.


Channel 4 documentary Lost Pharaohs Of The Nile recounts 'Black Pharaohs' living in The Kingdom of Kush including Taharqa (pictured leading a festival)


'The territory he controlled was probably more by volume than at any other time in Egyptian history.'

The story of Taharqa and the other 'Black Pharaohs' from Kush is told in a fascinating Channel 4 documentary, Lost Pharaohs Of The Nile.

They were not the pale-skinned Egyptians we associate with pharaohs, but black Africans.

And they were just as powerful and sophisticated as their northerly neighbours.

The Kingdom of Kush flourished from around 1,000BC to 350BC, more recently than the more famous pharaohs Tutankhamun and Ramses II, who ruled before 1,000BC in Egypt.

During the Kush period, the two kingdoms vied for power, and between about 760BC and 650BC, notably during the reign of Taharqa, the Black Pharaohs controlled all of Egypt and Kush.


Rachael Dann (pictured) of the University of Copenhagen, explores the burial chamber of Queen Qalhata, wife of one of Taharqa's predecessors

Yet they've been overlooked throughout history, and the programme follows historians and archaeologists working in Sudan who are determined to restore their reputation.

'There was persistent denial that black Africans could have built a powerful civilisation worthy of the same attention and respect as Egypt,' says Geoff Emberling, archaeologist at the University of Michigan.

Yet the ancient Kush city of Meroë boasts more pyramids than in all of Egypt.

Taharqa's pyramid is at the royal necropolis of Nuri, and although it has been explored already, there is another pyramid, or a burial chamber deep beneath it, that has yet to be fully explored.

It is completely flooded by the waters of the Nile, and the documentary follows Professor Creasman and his team as they dive to explore what lies beneath the murky waters.


Professor Creasman and his team explore a burial chamber beneath Taharqa's pyramid at the royal necropolis of Nuri. pictured: The Royal Pyramids of Meroe, Kush's third capital

'As far as I am aware no one has dived a tomb anywhere in the world before, and certainly no one has dived a pyramid,' says Professor Creasman.

The first bucket they pulled up brought with it shards of Kush pottery and gold leaf, suggesting great treasures could lie beneath.

Indeed, Prof Creasman is certain there is a sarcophagus with the remains of King Nastasen, who ruled the Kingdom of Kush between 335BC and 315BC.

The professor intends to return next year to find out more.

But he – and all the other experts working in Sudan, including Rachael Dann of the University of Copenhagen, who is exploring the burial chamber of Queen Qalhata, wife of one of Taharqa's predecessors – will have a race against the clock.

There are plans to build hydroelectric dams which could flood important sites, as the building of the Aswan Dam in Egypt in the 1960s caused sites there to be destroyed.

Just as the kingdom of the Black Pharaohs is being rediscovered, much of it could soon be lost.

Lost Pharaohs Of The Nile, 13 October, 8pm, Ch4.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/a...-new-show.html

Really interesting doc, BL. I happened to catch it on PBS awhile ago. It was the first I'd ever heard of the Kush Pharohs. They were a powerful and creative nation in their time.
 
Curious Cdn
#6
Designing and building all those pyramids was a Kushy Bronze Age job.
 
MHz
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Designing and building all those pyramids was a Kushy Bronze Age job.

There are 100's of megaliths around the globe, those Egyptians were busy. Too bad about the elongated skulls as that is a sign of extreme inbreeding.

More like the result of 'clear thinking'. No mention of this part of the history of the area, I know why, do you??
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/front...c/history.html






c.3400 B.C.

The opium poppy is cultivated in lower Mesopotamia. The Sumerians refer to it as Hul Gil, the 'joy plant.' The Sumerians would soon pass along the plant and its euphoric effects to the Assyrians. The art of poppy-culling would continue from the Assyrians to the Babylonians who in turn would pass their knowledge onto the Egyptians.
c.1300 B.C.
In the capital city of Thebes, Egyptians begin cultivation of opium thebaicum,grown in their famous poppy fields.The opium trade flourishes during the reign of Thutmose IV, Akhenaton and King Tutankhamen. The trade route included the Phoenicians and Minoans who move the profitable item across the Mediterranean Sea into Greece, Carthage, and Europe.
c.1100 B.C.
On the island of Cyprus, the "Peoples of the Sea" craft surgical-quality culling knives to harvest opium, which they would cultivate, trade and smoke before the fall of Troy.
c. 460 B.C.
Hippocrates, "the father of medicine", dismisses the magical attributes of opium but acknowledges its usefulness as a narcotic and styptic in treating internal diseases, diseases of women and epidemics.
330 B.C.
Alexander the Great introduces opium to the people of Persia and India.
A.D. 400
Opium thebaicum, from the Egytpian fields at Thebes, is first introduced to China by Arab traders.
1300's
Opium disappears for two hundred years from European historical record. Opium had become a taboo subject for those in circles of learning during the Holy Inquisition. In the eyes of the Inquisition, anything from the East was linked to the Devil.
1500
The Portugese, while trading along the East China Sea, initiate the smoking ofopium. The effects were instantaneous as they discovered but it was a practice the Chinese considered barbaric and subversive.