Grizzly bear attack hospitalizes Northern B.C. hunter


B00Mer
#1
Grizzly bear attack hospitalizes Northern B.C. hunter



Conservation officers are combing through the eastern slopes of Butler Ridge Provincial Park in northern B.C., after a grizzly bear attacked a hunter over the weekend.

Ed Basha, 60, from Hudson's Hope, B.C., was hunting alone near the northern part of the park on Saturday when he says he was attacked by the bear.

He suffered injuries to his face and his upper and lower body, but he was able to walk to his car and drive to get help.

According to unconfirmed reports, he then drove to the nearest home, where a woman then took him to a nearby oil and gas camp.

A medic at the camp was able to keep him stable until he was airlifted to a hospital in Fort St. John, B.C. He was then transferred to an Edmonton hospital where he remains in stable condition.

Conservation officer Brad Lacey said they have not been able to locate the bear or the exact location of the attack.

"That's been the biggest hurdle," he said. "He was alone, no one had witnessed it, nobody was with him at the time. Being able to locate that spot of the attack has been problematic."

Conservation officers plan to interview the man to learn more about the attack. According to the B.C. Parks website, the Conservation Officer Service has sent a predator attack team to the park and is requesting people to stay clear of the area until the investigation is complete.

Lacey said bear encounters are more common this time of the year as the animals search for food in preparation for winter.

Butler Ridge Provincial Park is located in the Peace River Regional District near Hudson's Hope.

source: Grizzly bear attack hospitalizes Northern B.C. hunter - British Columbia - CBC News
 
Cliffy
+2
#2
Ya, so? The hunter became the hunted. Fair is fair. Why does he have more rights than the bear? Leave the bear alone. He was only being what he is. Going into bear territory is dealing with them on their terms. If a bear comes into our territory, it is usually shot - our terms. The putz shouldn't have been out there on his own anyway.
 
Cannuck
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Why does he have more rights than the bear?

Because rights are something that are granted to humans and not to animals. Suck it up Cliff.
 
Cliffy
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Because rights are something that are granted to humans and not to animals. Suck it up Cliff.

How very human of you.
 
Locutus
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Because rights are something that are granted to humans and not to animals.

Jealousy is such a petty emotion.
 
Cannuck
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

How very human of you.

I should hope so, given that I'm human. Unlike you, I don't hate myself.
 
Cliffy
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

I should hope so, given that I'm human. Unlike you, I don't hate myself.

Humans are animals too. And this has nothing to do with self hatred. Funny you should bring that up (kettle).
 
Johnnny
#8
Although i love nature and all its animals... The bear should be hunted so as this doesn't happen to someone who isn't capable of defending themselves. Like a jogger or the babysitter taking your kid out for a walk.
 
karrie
+2
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Johnnny View Post

Although i love nature and all its animals... The bear should be hunted so as this doesn't happen to someone who isn't capable of defending themselves. Like a jogger or the babysitter taking your kid out for a walk.

This didn't happen in a populated area, the babysitter is not at risk.
 
Locutus
+1
#10
Thems the breaks. And, I'm pretty certain that if a grizzly wanted to kill this dude, he'd be dead.

It's an occupational hazard of hunting in bear country folks.
 
Cannuck
+1
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Humans are animals too.

Of course they aren't...unless you want to ignore the legality of the issue. You did, after all, bring up "rights" which don't exist in nature.
 
Nuggler
#12
""Ed Basha, 60, from Hudson's Hope, B.C., was hunting alone near the northern part of the park on Saturday when he says he was attacked by the bear.""


He was hunting alone

With a gun ??

You have to point and shoot.

Suppose it could get a tad perilous when the bear gets within 3 or so feet..............

Some years ago a park ranger was on patrol in Alaska when he spotted a Grizz. The ranger carried a .44 mag. revolver, but the bear attacked and he (ranger) was killed. Never had a chance to draw it.................the gun that is. They found his pencil and sketch pad in some bear scat.
...........so I heard.
 
gopher
+3
#13  Top Rated Post
Victory for the good guy!
 
L Gilbert
+2
#14
Hunting alone - stupid.
When in country with bears in it, expect bears to be in it.
If it doesn't act like a "civilised human being", kill it - also stupid.
 
gopher
+1
#15
People invariably pay the price when they choose to be stupid. A good Karelian bear dog is easy to raise as they are smart and fearless. Feed them plenty of meat and they will remain loyal for life. If I lived up in the North country I would raise one for hunting moose and bears (but not for hunting my fellow rodents).
 
karrie
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

People invariably pay the price when they choose to be stupid. A good Karelian bear dog is easy to raise as they are smart and fearless. Feed them plenty of meat and they will remain loyal for life. If I lived up in the North country I would raise one for hunting moose and bears (but not for hunting my fellow rodents).

the problem with raising aggressive dogs is that they aren't always discerning in what they kill, and unless he lived where he was hunting, that can cause major issues for other people, cattle, dogs, kids, etc.
 
gopher
+1
#17
Karelian bear dogs are territorial but very smart as well. True, if another dog strays into his territory a Karelian will attack but If trained properly they don't prowl around looking to attack other animals.
 
Nuggler
+1
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

Karelian bear dogs are territorial but very smart as well. True, if another dog strays into his territory a Karelian will attack but If trained properly they don't prowl around looking to attack other animals.



"If trained properly"................That's the part I have trouble with, Goober. Ya never know if they are.

It's a big WOOPS!! ---- as the 90 year old gramma lays bleeding on the sidewalk. -- with no throat.

But hey, given the demographics, there's gonna be lots of 90 year old grammas.

THOR - KILL !!

 
gopher
+1
#19
I'm just a little better looking than Goober. But from what I've heard Karelians are a lot smarter than pitbulls. There is far less danger with them around as they are not attack dogs but hunting dogs.
 
karrie
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

I'm just a little better looking than Goober. But from what I've heard Karelians are a lot smarter than pitbulls. There is far less danger with them around as they are not attack dogs but hunting dogs.

What you've heard. So you're not even actually familiar with the breed?

It's all well and good to say what you would do if you lived in bear country. But declaring someone else stupid, declaring how it 'should' be done, when you don't even know for sure.... it sits wrong gopher.
 
L Gilbert
+1
#21
Karelians, like other breeds, are normally territorial and challenge other critters that encroach. If threatened they will retaliate, like other breeds. There are two around this neighborhood and are perfectly approachable and friendly when their owners are around.
Loads of myths created by the sensationalism of newsmedia have caused a lot of idiotic paranoia about dogs and attacks (among a lot of other things). Dogs and other critters are as individual as humans and I've met quite a few rotties and pitbulls and other "attack" dogs that have never attacked people or other animals.
Whatever. At 60 yrs old this goof should have known better than to push his luck by hunting alone and making himself prey to other critters.
 
Nuggler
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

I'm just a little better looking than Goober. But from what I've heard Karelians are a lot smarter than pitbulls. There is far less danger with them around as they are not attack dogs but hunting dogs.


Woops my bad. Sorry.
 
Cliffy
#23
Best bear dog is a small and fast breed like a Jack Russel. They can run circles around a bear and are such a small target that they can usually avoid getting whacked. Large breeds are slow and easy targets. A large dog might be great for guarding the home property, but in the woods, give me small and fast. They'll drive a bear to frustration and it will just run off (usually). But like any wild animal, always expect the unexpected from them.
 
karrie
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by L Gilbert View Post

At 60 yrs old this goof should have known better than to push his luck by hunting alone and making himself prey to other critters.

It's not the safest thing to do, but, some people I know hunt alone, especially those who HAVE to hunt (such as pensioners who need to top their freezer off). One friend was shot last year, and happened to have company with him for the first time that season, by sheer coincidence. Normally, he'd have been alone, the nature of the game when you actually live in the bush. He got very lucky.

There are a plethora of 'I would' scenarios we can all engage in anytime anyone anywhere gets hurt. "he's dumb, I'd get a dog." "He's stupid, I'd hunt with someone." But the fact of the matter is, one day we may be the ones hurt, and have people a world away dreaming up how we should have could have done things differently, and it will make zero difference in the reality of the situation.
 
PoliticalNick
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Grizzly bear attack hospitalizes Northern B.C. hunter

What the hell was he doing attacking a grizzly, didn't he know those things are dangerous.
 
Sal
+1
#26
I feel sorry the guy got attacked but to go looking for the bear who was on home ground and doing his thing is just wrong and irritated me as soon as I read it. Why does the bear have to die because of human error. What is wrong with us that we have this kind of revenge mentality?
 
gopher
+1
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

What you've heard. So you're not even actually familiar with the breed?

It's all well and good to say what you would do if you lived in bear country. But declaring someone else stupid, declaring how it 'should' be done, when you don't even know for sure.... it sits wrong gopher.


I didn't call anybody here stupid - My reference was strictly to the guy who knowingly took a needless risk and he paid the price for it.

A co-worker of mine had one and we chatted a few times about his pooch. He moved out before we had a chance to go on a hiking and hunting trip so I never got to see his dog. But I heard enough about the breed over the few months that I knew this guy who moved way up to northern Minnesota where he hunts big game as a hobby.
 
Nuggler
+1
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Sal View Post

I feel sorry the guy got attacked but to go looking for the bear who was on home ground and doing his thing is just wrong and irritated me as soon as I read it. Why does the bear have to die because of human error. What is wrong with us that we have this kind of revenge mentality?



Cause that's what we do best, Sal.

A really really good job. eh.
 
Sal
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Nuggler View Post

Cause that's what we do best, Sal.

A really really good job. eh.

it seems like that is what we do best...we want to kill everything and anything if it doesn't suit us...just blast it off, people or animals
 
karrie
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

I didn't call anybody here stupid - My reference was strictly to the guy who knowingly took a needless risk and he paid the price for it.

A co-worker of mine had one and we chatted a few times about his pooch. He moved out before we had a chance to go on a hiking and hunting trip so I never got to see his dog. But I heard enough about the breed over the few months that I knew this guy who moved way up to northern Minnesota where he hunts big game as a hobby.

Precisely.