Wawa proof of Canada's historical cosmopolitanism.


White_Unifier
#1
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinook_Jargon

I've been reading about Chinuk Wawa and find it fascinating. Indigenous peoples, Hawaiians, Chinese, Spanish, English, French, were all trading around the Pacific North West in Wawa prior to confederation. The Wawa-speaking community shows a history of diversity in Canada like few other languages can.
 
Curious Cdn
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinook_Jargon

I've been reading about Chinuk Wawa and find it fascinating. Indigenous peoples, Hawaiians, Chinese, Spanish, English, French, were all trading around the Pacific North West in Wawa prior to confederation. The Wawa-speaking community shows a history of diversity in Canada like few other languages can.

Another Western patois was called "Chinook".

Same language, I see ...

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinook_Jargon
 
White_Unifier
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Another Western patois was called "Chinook".

Same language, I see ...

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinook_Jargon

Chinuk Wawa was spoken from the northern tip of what is today California all the way to the southern tip of Alaska and even into Oregon and to a lesser extent the Yukon.

What I find fascinating though is that Chinuk Wawa actually contains words from the different indigenous languages, English, French, Spanish, Russian, Hawaiian, and even Chinese and predates confederation. In fact, it remained a major language of the Pacific Northwest until around 1900 in what is now BC and until around 1930 in what is today Washington state. teach about the history of this language in history class and it will be pretty hard for anyone to believe that Canada was founded by just two founding peoples. Even the vocabulary of the language keeps a trace of the different linguistic influences even from across the Pacific Ocean.
 
Hoid
#4
Skookum is a chinook word meaning well built or sturdy .
 
pgs
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Skookum is a chinook word meaning well built or sturdy .

Arenít you the font of knowledge ?
 
Hoid
#6
Tyee is another bit of jargon that has made its way into english.
 
petros
#7
There is a Tribe in Pitt Ghettos that claims to be part Hawaiian.
 
Cliffy
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Skookum is a chinook word meaning well built or sturdy .

Does that mean that Skookumchuck was well built by Ukrainians?
 
Hoid
#9
Skookum is actually a word that we needed in english.
 
Johnnny
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinook_Jargon
I've been reading about Chinuk Wawa and find it fascinating. Indigenous peoples, Hawaiians, Chinese, Spanish, English, French, were all trading around the Pacific North West in Wawa prior to confederation. The Wawa-speaking community shows a history of diversity in Canada like few other languages can.

Ojibwae had a similar position as a trade language in the great lakes before also.
 
White_Unifier
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Johnnny View Post

Ojibwae had a similar position as a trade language in the great lakes before also.

I do remember reading about the existence of a simplified Ojibwa that speakers of different Algonquian languages used:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broken_Oghibbeway

The following might interest you too:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indige...ixed_languages

They really were Esperantists at heart
 

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