Canada the world's second most tornado-prone country: Climatologist


spaminator
-1
#1
Canada the world's second most tornado-prone country: Climatologist
Eddie Chau
Published:
June 2, 2019
Updated:
June 2, 2019 4:27 PM EDT
Rain obscures the view of a tornado on May 28, 2019 in Lawrence, Kansas. The Midwest has seen extensive severe weather this spring with widespread flooding and multiple tornadoes.Kyle Rivas / Getty Images
When that funnel cloud appears, you better disappear.
An awkward mixture of temperatures recently led to a path of destruction in the midwestern United States with deadly tornadoes ripping through Kansas, Ohio and Indiana.
And Canada is far from immune to funnel clouds.
Environment Canada Senior Climatologist David Phillips cautioned that Canada is the second most tornado-prone country in the world.
“It typically varies … but there are typically 40 to 60 tornadoes in a year (in Canada),” Phillips told the Toronto Sun. “Most are weak ones — the (category) F0s, F1s and F2s. They don’t cause too much damage.”
Even though Canada is ranked second in the world behind the U.S., Phillips noted Canada isn’t a “hotbed” for regular tornado activity. Tornadoes typically pop up in May, June and July.
So what causes a tornado to form?
“They need a recipe of cool and hot and humid air,” said Phillips. “The warm, humid air comes in while the cool air hangs around and a storm brews.”
With the mixture of air comes rising air and a change in wind direction, usually in an environment where a thunderstorm is developing, added Doug Gillham, a meteorologist with the Weather Network.
“You need rising air, which generates thunderstorms,” Gillham said. “Winds from the south, east and west get those thunderstorms rotating.”
On average, Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan get 15 tornadoes per season, with Quebec being hit with less than 10. Other Canadian provinces and territories are less threatened by the destructive funnel clouds.
The deadliest recorded tornado to hit Canada was the Regina Cyclone, an F4 tornado that ripped through Regina, Sask. on June 30, 1912, killing 28 people and injuring more than 300.
The strongest tornado to touch ground in Canada was a F5 tornado that reared its ugly head near Elie, Man., on June 22, 2007, according to Environment and Climate Change Canada.
It’s currently prime tornado and storm season, according to Phillips, who added, “It’s the cool air from Canada mixing with the warm air from the Carolinas.”
There have only been two confirmed tornadoes to touch down in Canada in 2019. On April 24, an F0 tornado damaged some property just west of Edmonton, Alta. On May 3, Environment Canada reported a F0 tornado about six kilometres southeast of Letellier, Man.
Expect more crummy weather
Those expecting to trade in their umbrellas for short sleeves and sandals will have to wait.
The crummy cool and soggy weather we’ve been experiencing will continue for at least a little longer, says Weather Network Meteorologist Doug Gillham.
Gillham said the weather we’re experiencing now is on “a month delay.”
“Some years, we jump straight from winter to summer,” said Gillham. “Unfortunately, we’re not at risk of that this year.”
The meteorologist predicted the chilly pattern will start to disappear later this month.
“The average temperature is steadily climbing. Things will be less crummy in June,” he added. “It’s understandable that people are becoming impatient with the lack of warmth.”
Southern Ontario has been a “battle zone” between the cold front from eastern Canada and the warmth coming up from the United States, Gillham said.
Gillham is expecting a wetter than normal summer.
“I expect some dry spells, but there will be more thunderstorms than normal,” he said.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...nado_outbreaks
http://saskarchives.com/collections/...a-cyclone-1912
http://ec.gc.ca/meteo-weather/defaul...n&n=07580648-1
http://edmonton.ctvnews.ca/tornado-t...sday-1.4396540
http://torontosun.com/news/national/...-climatologist
 
Curious Cdn
#2
I believe it. It's going to get worse, too.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#3  Top Rated Post
Tornados have been crossing the prairies forever CC
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Tornados have been crossing the prairies forever CC

I drove in front of one ...at about the same speed as the storm front was travelling. I was driving from Calgary to Regina in the mid-1990s and a tornado hit Brooks just behind me. I dropped in on my Aunt in Regina just in time for the power outage that lasted all evening.

What a great way to learn about family history ... by candle light during a Prairie thunderstorm that looked like the bombardment of Tobruk at night.

We get tornados, here too. There was one that struck a couple of decades back in my mother's home town on the Niagara Penninsula that ripped up one side of a rural road, felling every tree and leaving the little pioneer church that I was married in, baptised in , my parents were married in, etc....going back to 1833 in a continuous line, completely unscathed. Not a roof shingle was out of place.
 
Cliffy
#5
Could it be because in other parts of the world they are called cyclones?
 
Curious Cdn
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Could it be because in other parts of the world they are called cyclones?

So are hurricanes. Cyclone is a pretty general term.
 
petros
+1
#7
There will be plenty this year. Conditions are perfect.
 
petros
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

So are hurricanes. Cyclone is a pretty general term.

Tornado is a tornado. Cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons are rotating storms.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#9
Cyclones and Hurricanes pick on fishermen Tornadoes pick on farmers
 
petros
+1
#10
They'll get you and your little dog too.
 
Curious Cdn
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

They'll get you and your little dog too.

Hang on to your Ruby slippers, Princess!
 
MHz
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Hang on to your Ruby slippers, Princess!

Why do you think it was changed from 'silver slippers', . . . . Dorothy??
Is a twister that doesn't take a lot a lives worse than a flash flood or any other bad weather event that takes more lives or causes more property damage?
 
Curious Cdn
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Why do you think it was changed from 'silver slippers', . . . . Dorothy??
Is a twister that doesn't take a lot a lives worse than a flash flood or any other bad weather event that takes more lives or causes more property damage?

Ruby looks better on an Emerald background?

The Munchkins were Jewish jewellers in disguise?
 
Jinentonix
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I drove in front of one ...at about the same speed as the storm front was travelling. I was driving from Calgary to Regina in the mid-1990s and a tornado hit Brooks just behind me. I dropped in on my Aunt in Regina just in time for the power outage that lasted all evening.
What a great way to learn about family history ... by candle light during a Prairie thunderstorm that looked like the bombardment of Tobruk at night.
We get tornados, here too. There was one that struck a couple of decades back in my mother's home town on the Niagara Penninsula that ripped up one side of a rural road, felling every tree and leaving the little pioneer church that I was married in, baptised in , my parents were married in, etc....going back to 1833 in a continuous line, completely unscathed. Not a roof shingle was out of place.

Yep, I saw something similar on the road between Cambridge and Paris. You could see the tornado track run right between two houses with nary a roof shingle disturbed, but where it crossed the road it tore it up a bit and knocked down the stand of trees on the other side.

The most fun though was in 1981. I was 13 and my brother and I were heading to Prince Albert. It was funny too because even though it was sunny, I told my brother I could smell rain ahead. Sure enough a while later we ran into a nice storm that spawned two tornadoes at once. Not exactly a comfortable feeling being in a 1979 Honda Civic literally in the middle of butt-f*ck nowhere SK with no kind of shelter in sight. Luckily they didn't end up coming too close to us so it wasn't a big deal other than seeing two tornadoes on the ground at once, which was pretty cool.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Cyclones and Hurricanes pick on fishermen Tornadoes pick on farmers

Tornados pick on trailer parks. They hunt them down. In fact.
 

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