Conference examines climate change and transportation


spaminator
#1
Conference examines climate change and transportation
Glen Dawkins
Published:
March 2, 2019
Updated:
March 2, 2019 6:57 PM EST
Gravel roads in the Canadian Shield average about $3 million per kilometre to build while roads built in northern Manitoba cost about $2 million per kilometre.
Governments and other policy makers are beginning to get the message about the need to factor in climate change when designing and planning road and other infrastructure construction projects, according to a local expect speaking at a climate change and transportation conference at the University of Manitoba on Saturday.
“I think they are beginning to realize that,” said Dr. Marolo Alfaro, Professor of the Department of Civil Engineering at University of Manitoba and one of the speakers at the Northern Transport Conference on Climate Change and Transportation in the Canadian Shield. “In fact, the design codes for structures, buildings, highways and bridges are beginning to incorporate climate change effects.”
Melting permafrost and unusual storms have caused infrastructure gaps to emerge, and exposed the road and rail networks to greater maintenance. New methods and materials are being tested to stabilize these structures, but not without considerable costs. Gravel roads in the Canadian Shield average about $3 million per kilometre to build while Alfaro said roads built in northern Manitoba cost about $2 million per kilometre.
Dr. Marolo Alfaro, Professor, Dept. Civil Engineering, University of Manitoba Handout
“Warming temperatures can thaw the permafrost and most of the structures in the north rely heavily on the strength of permafrost,” said Alfaro, who spoke on the challenges involved in building all-weather gravel roads in remote northern areas. “The idea is that when you build structures in the north the foundation is good and will not thaw. But again climate warming can impact that.”
Despite being a relatively new field of study, Canada has become a world leader in the study of the effects of climate change on roads and infrastructure, said Alfaro.
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“They are doing a really good job of looking at and considering the effect of climate change,” said Alfaro, who has been studying the issue since 2005. “Canada is leading on that. There aren’t many countries still very aggressive in terms of the adaption strategies particularly on infrastructure in the north.”
The challenge now is to encourage the next generation of engineers to take up the challenge as many of the current experts are retiring, he said.
As climate variability grows stronger, the seasonal road transportation systems in the North are becoming less reliable. Half the useful season of the Winter Road network has been lost since 1996, and is predicted to shrink shorter. JOHN WOODS / THE CANADIAN PRESS
“For me, to do research you have to solve local problems and this is a problem in northern Manitoba,” Alfaro said.
The conference also dealt with issues involving ice roads as well as transportation options including the use of drones and airships to supply northern communities.
According to a release on the conference, the evidence of climate change points to a growing threat for the people living in remote northern communities. As climate variability grows stronger, the seasonal road transportation systems in the North are becoming less reliable. Half the useful season of the Winter Road network has been lost since 1996, and is predicted to shrink shorter. Even in weak El Nino years like 2019, the ability of ice road truckers to reach remote communities has become more uncertain.
gdawkins@postmedia.com
Twitter: @SunGlenDawkins
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...transportation
 
MHz
#2
Quick question or 2.


The Canadian Shield is granite, gravel is to add traction. You cannot get a vehicle stuck when driving on granite so why would it need gravel. It is the yearly re-graveling that ends up costing huge amounts of money. In the far north you could keep an ice-road frozen all year and you would add peat and chilled water every year instead of the non-existent gravel.
Put in a rail line and convert all vehicles to use those as the highway as well as the streets in the villages. Wheels and mud make for a long expensive journey.
Last edited by MHz; Mar 3rd, 2019 at 12:03 PM..
 
petros
+1
#3  Top Rated Post
Quit smoking that cheap ass mail order weed.
 

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