Urban Camping Wascana Park Style


Twin_Moose
#121
’60s Scoop sharing circles to guide provincial government’s apology

Quote:

The provincial government is taking a step closer to issuing an apology to '60s Scoop survivors.
In an effort to help inform a meaningful apology, the Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Saskatchewan (SSISS) will facilitate sharing circles over the next two months

"Not only am I asking '60s Scoop survivors to show up and tell their stories and begin that journey together, but also for the average citizen of Saskatchewan to show empathy and understanding. It's been a very traumatic and sad part of Saskatchewan history," SSISS co-chair Robert Doucette said.
"In a lot of instances, we see that it's a really liberating process, where you get something off your shoulders. Where you also see and realize that you're not alone.”
The '60s Scoop refers to a period in Saskatchewan’s history when Indigenous children were removed from their parents and communities by provincial child welfare services.
"I do want to hear an apology, because it will validate how I felt all my life, that myself, and my mother and my family were not wrong. We didn't do anything wrong," Doucette said.
"We're looking forward to formalizing an apology as we had committed to; an apology that is meaningful to those involved. We look forward to doing that at the first opportunity," Premier Scott Moe said.

The following sessions will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. with a pipe ceremony at 7:30 a.m.:
Oct. 13: Senior Citizens Activity Centre, Meadow Lake
Oct. 20: Western Development Museum, North Battleford
Oct. 27: Senator Allen Bird Gym, Saturday, Prince Albert
Nov. 3 and 4: Saskatoon Indian & Métis Friendship Centre, Saskatoon
Nov. 17: Treaty Four Governance Centre, Fort Qu’Appelle
Nov. 24 and 25: Mâmawęyatitân Centre, Regina
There is also the option to submit stories online, if unable to attend a sharing circle.

What are the odds this will be the end of this matter?
 
Decapoda
+2
#122
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

’60s Scoop sharing circles to guide provincial government’s apology

What are the odds this will be the end of this matter?

Are they bringing a cheque for $200 million to "add substance to the apology"?

Funny, first they wanted an apology. ...No problem, Brad Wall back in 2015 said they would get one.

Then the apology had to be on FN land. ...Okay, done.

Then it was delayed by the FN chiefs, in which the chiefs cited "scheduling conflicts". ...The Sask. government patiently waited, with Brad Wall stating "We've reached out to First Nation groups to say 'you make the call, We will do it wherever and whenever."

Then, FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron sent a letter to the Government requesting $200 million in compensation be attached to any apology that may be forthcoming, to "add substance to the apology". ...Brad Wall said "That's not where we started with the apology, the short answer is no, that's not something the government's going to be doing."


This isn't about an apology...the FN chiefs don't want an apology, they want to politicize and hold it over the heads of the Sask. government and people indefinitely. It will never be enough to satisfy them...never.

'People need to heal': FSIN looking to get Sixties Scoop apology before Brad Wall retires

Sask. government should pay $200M in compensation to Sixties Scoop survivors, says FSIN
 
Mowich
+1
#123
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

’60s Scoop sharing circles to guide provincial government’s apology

What are the odds this will be the end of this matter?


One can always hope, TM.............but I wouldn't be putting down any bets.
 
Mowich
+3
#124
Quote: Originally Posted by Decapoda View Post

Are they bringing a cheque for $200 million to "add substance to the apology"?

Funny, first they wanted an apology. ...No problem, Brad Wall back in 2015 said they would get one.

Then the apology had to be on FN land. ...Okay, done.

Then it was delayed by the FN chiefs, in which the chiefs cited "scheduling conflicts". ...The Sask. government patiently waited, with Brad Wall stating "We've reached out to First Nation groups to say 'you make the call, We will do it wherever and whenever."

Then, FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron sent a letter to the Government requesting $200 million in compensation be attached to any apology that may be forthcoming, to "add substance to the apology". ...Brad Wall said "That's not where we started with the apology, the short answer is no, that's not something the government's going to be doing."


This isn't about an apology...the FN chiefs don't want an apology, they want to politicize and hold it over the heads of the Sask. government and people indefinitely. It will never be enough to satisfy them...never.

'People need to heal': FSIN looking to get Sixties Scoop apology before Brad Wall retires

Sask. government should pay $200M in compensation to Sixties Scoop survivors, says FSIN

Maybe someone should do a study to see why it is that natives heal at a slower rate than Canadians of other ethnicities who have suffered various types of severe trauma but still managed to pull their lives back together and get on with them. Added to that is the fact that while natives have entire communities to provide solace and comfort, many survivors of severe trauma might only have their immediate families and a close circle of friends. Many of them have to fight for the resources necessary to aid them in their recovery while on all but the most remote reserves, help is provided in the form of government agencies and funding.


I read article after article about Syrians who were brought to our country to escape the hell of war in which their homelands are embroiled. Some endured years of daily bombings, shootings, rapes, hangings, forced suicides and the murders of babies and children before they were able to flee their captors only to find themselves stuck in a tent city along with millions of other refugees for years before they won their freedom in Canada. Two years later, family after family are taxpaying members of society - many of them have started thriving businesses. When interviewed, the gratitude they express for the opportunity to start a new life here in Canada is overwhelming.

And yes, there are Syrians who have committed crimes. But consider this, in 2016 as February drew to a close, 25,000 of them had been settled in Canada. Twenty-five thousand. I have no idea how all of them are doing now. I do know that those who have embraced our country with both hands are much more in the news than those who didn't.
 
pgs
+1
#125
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Maybe someone should do a study to see why it is that natives heal at a slower rate than Canadians of other ethnicities who have suffered various types of severe trauma but still managed to pull their lives back together and get on with them. Added to that is the fact that while natives have entire communities to provide solace and comfort, many survivors of severe trauma might only have their immediate families and a close circle of friends. Many of them have to fight for the resources necessary to aid them in their recovery while on all but the most remote reserves, help is provided in the form of government agencies and funding.


I read article after article about Syrians who were brought to our country to escape the hell of war in which their homelands are embroiled. Some endured years of daily bombings, shootings, rapes, hangings, forced suicides and the murders of babies and children before they were able to flee their captors only to find themselves stuck in a tent city along with millions of other refugees for years before they won their freedom in Canada. Two years later, family after family are taxpaying members of society - many of them have started thriving businesses. When interviewed, the gratitude they express for the opportunity to start a new life here in Canada is overwhelming.

And yes, there are Syrians who have committed crimes. But consider this, in 2016 as February drew to a close, 25,000 of them had been settled in Canada. Twenty-five thousand. I have no idea how all of them are doing now. I do know that those who have embraced our country with both hands are much more in the news than those who didn't.

Yes but the media certainly down plays any Syrian crime, as the death of a 13 year old girl in a park shows .
 
Mowich
#126
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Yes but the media certainly down plays any Syrian crime, as the death of a 13 year old girl in a park shows .


Which in no way refutes what I wrote.
 
pgs
+1
#127
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Which in no way refutes what I wrote.

No , but it is not all sunshine and lollipops. The sunshine and lollipops is definitely a good thing but let’s notlose sight of the negative affects of the refugee situation . We in Canada have seen a few apparently lone wolf situations where mostly young men of dubious mental capabilities have been radicalized with disastrous results . Funny but for some reason they are never part of the immigration debate .
 
Mowich
#128
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

No , but it is not all sunshine and lollipops. The sunshine and lollipops is definitely a good thing but let’s notlose sight of the negative affects of the refugee situation . We in Canada have seen a few apparently lone wolf situations where mostly young men of dubious mental capabilities have been radicalized with disastrous results . Funny but for some reason they are never part of the immigration debate .


Your 'lone wolf' could come from any one of the many different ethnicities who enter the country every year. As I recall, at least one was a Canadian by birth.
 

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