Canada playing 'catch up' in China's booming market Canada needs to brand itself bett


china
#1
China National News | News as it Happens in China

Prime Minister Stephen Harper is now trying to make up for lost time when it comes to Canada's ties with China, and there is a lot of work to do to brand Canada as a serious player in the international market, according to the head of the country's biggest business association.

Perrin Beatty, president and chief executive officer of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce said in an interview last week in Hong Kong that both the federal government and the business community have ignored China's booming economic growth for too long.

"During the first part of the current government's term in office I'm not sure they fully understood how much Canada's strategic interests were international — that our success in Lethbridge would depend on how we're doing in Hong Kong," said Beatty. "They've learned."

Perrin Beatty, president and CEO of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, says Canada has to do a better job of branding itself in order to compete internationally. He's shown here at an event in 2009. (Rebecca Cook/Reuters)
Beatty said the Harper government is now more focused on diversifying trade beyond the United States and that there has been a "real maturation" in the government's view on Canada's relationship with China, but that "we're playing catch up."

"The rest of the world is here [in China], they're branding themselves and doing so effectively," said Beatty, a former Progressive Conservative member of Parliament and cabinet minister. He was in Hong Kong to meet with local and Canadian people from government and other sectors.

He said Canada used to have a privileged position in China but it was lost partly because successive federal governments did not give it the attention it deserved, and partly because the business community was too focused on the "seductive" American market right next door.

Canada needs better business brand recognition
Canadian businesses have to grow internationally and better branding will be key to that success, said Beatty. He said he consistently hears from international contacts that Canada is known for its stunning landscapes and friendly people — not business. That has to change, said Beatty.

"We need to brand Canada as a high-technology, well-educated, dynamic country with a lot to offer in the global marketplace. We haven't done that," he said.

Confusion surrounds Canada's multiple levels of government, each with different responsibilities and ways of doing things, said Beatty, and that can ward off potential foreign trade and business deals. The federal government should take more leadership in presenting Canada as a cohesive country, he said.

'You don't isolate China, you isolate yourself.'
—Perrin Beatty, president, CEO, Canadian Chamber of Commerce
Canada's diplomats and trade commissioners do what they can with the resources they have, said Beatty, and they should get more support to help push Canada ahead.

Canada has 11 offices in China, including the embassy in Beijing, that offer support to Canadian businesses trying to break into the complicated Chinese market. Business associations, such as the Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong, are also promoting greater business ties.

Harper has started taking visible steps to strengthen Canada's relationship with China. He took his second trip there in February 2012 and signed a number of agreements. In September, the controversial Canada-China Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement was signed.

Canada is much more engaged in China now but is still under pressure and has to "step it up," said Beatty. He acknowledges that's easier said than done, however, given China's complexity and the competition Canada faces. Beatty also acknowledges that reports in the media about intellectual property theft and computer hacking don't help to strengthen the relationship and that the human rights concerns in some Chinese factories are "very real."

But foreign companies can help raise working standards and have a positive effect on how China does business, he said, adding that cutting off China because of how it conducts itself would be a "terrible mistake."

"You don't isolate China, you isolate yourself. This is an economy that is going to be the number one economy in the world, it is the largest country in the world today by population and its influence in every sphere is increasing dramatically," he said. "You want to be engaged with somebody like that, you don't want to assume that they're going to be begging to do business with you if you don't make the effort yourself."
__________________________________________________ ___________________________________

Harper is on the right truck . What he needs is the support of the country .
Last edited by china; Feb 12th, 2013 at 02:35 PM..
 
Johnnny
#2
We can pay them in bowls of rice, because thats what you say they like right? And no one would know better than you
 
china
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Johnnny View Post

We can pay them in bowls of rice, because thats what you say they like right? And no one would know better than you

Johnnny ....you`re a looser.....lol
 
lone wolf
+2
#4  Top Rated Post
Kaopectate can fix that
 
jariax
+1
#5
What exactly are we going to see to China?
There are a handful of technology companies with goods to sell, but for how long? China doesn't respect intellectual property and makes cheaper copies of just about everything , thanks to their cheap labor, and lax labour regulations.

That leaves raw materials. I hardly think that we need to launch a charm offensive to convince China to start a trade relationship with us where they take our natural resources, and we take their cheap manufactured goods. Every country in the world wants that kind of trading relationship.

China should be pandering to us, not the other way around. I don't care how big they are
 
Nuggler
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

Kaopectate can fix that

He won't get that. Not the kaopectate, the joke..........well probably not the kao, either.

We could sell corn flakes to China and guarantee it won't have radioactive plastic filler.
 
relic
#7
So this must be why steve & co are saying that if we don't build some pipelines to China ,from alberta now,the world will end.Christ !!!
 
petros
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by relic View Post

So this must be why steve & co are saying that if we don't build some pipelines to China ,from alberta now,the world will end.Christ !!!

You forgot India, Japan, Korea and the rest of SE Asia being supplied by the gateway line.

The XL line to Texas will be supplying the EU. Do we have reason to not supply the EU too?
 
Machjo
#9
An efficient and sustainable economy is more important than a growing economy. A growing economy should be viewed only as an added bonus. If you have inefficient and unsustainable growth, then it's just a bubble economy.
 
china
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Machjo View Post

An efficient and sustainable economy is more important than a growing economy. A growing economy should be viewed only as an added bonus. If you have inefficient and unsustainable growth, then it's just a bubble economy.

There is still allot of room in China to grow before its economy become a "bubbly economy".
Wether it will become stable economy.... we'll have to wait and see .
 
Machjo
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by china View Post

There is still allot of room in China to grow before its economy become a "bubbly economy".
Wether it will become stable economy.... we'll have to wait and see .

Agreed. I'm just saying it would be unwiase for the government of Canada to force growth. If the economy grows, it grows, if it doesn't it doesn't. The government ought to focus on economic efficiency, and let the market take care of the rest. Forced growth is never good.
 
china
#12
Canada's should be focused on its own growth , which means "production" not selling its natural resources .
 
Machjo
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by china View Post

Canada's should be focused on its own growth , which means "production" not selling its natural resources .

Maybe there's a misunderstanding. Yes, increase production, but that's a job for the private sector. The government can aim at streamlining itself and making itself more efficient, training the unemployed, promoting free trade and such, but in the end actual growth is a private sector cocern. The government should only worry about efficiency.

And I do agree that we should not sell our resources at all cost, even if dirt cheap. And yes we should focus on production. So what can the governemnt do? It can sell its resources at a higher price to discourage resource exploitation, and train the unemployed to make manufacturing investment more attractive certainly.
 
china
#14
Quote:

Maybe there's a misunderstanding. Yes, increase production, but that's a job for the private sector. The government can aim at streamlining itself and making itself more efficient, training the unemployed, promoting free trade and such, but in the end actual growth is a private sector concern. The government should only worry about efficiency.


It has bin tried before .............. I think .
 
Machjo
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by china View Post

It has bin tried before .............. I think .

I'm not following you. You mean the government forcing economic growth? Trudeau tried it. Generally government-forced economic growth is unsustainable. if the government focuses on economic efficiency, then that increases the chances of growth in the private sector, but that's abotu the best the governemnt can do in a long-term sustainable manner.
 
Tonington
#16
Returning the SRED tax credit program to it's former glory would be a good first step. Let the market decide what technology to pursue. If the government focuses solely on improving trade relations specifically with countries, that is far too myopic to capitalize on all the opportunities that are out there.

A technologically advanced nation can respond to trade opportunities globally. That should be the goal, not focussing on what one partner needs. That's what got us in the mess with the US dependency in the first place.
 

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