Latest Federal Polls


JLM
No Party Affiliation
+3 / -1
#121
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Trudeau isn't unique in terms of making mistakes, however, he's making quite a few and among those, some very high profile gaffes.

At some point you just can't bounce back

Yep, once his true colours are recognized!
 
mentalfloss
#122
 
captain morgan
No Party Affiliation
#123
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Yep, once his true colours are recognized!

True dat.... Old JT is really starting to stumble bad.

 
mentalfloss
#124
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#125
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

True dat.... Old JT is really starting to stumble bad.

Yeah, he could be "on the ropes"! But voters can be such a flaky bunch, "it just ain't over till it's over"
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
+1
#126
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

OH look!

3 people out of 10 now think the conservative party is good

That must mean being a right wing moron is normal.

The flip side is that means 60% are retarded.

Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

I mean nobody actually thinks anyone is voting for the conservatives do they?

They are voting against the liberals.

That is the best the conservatives can hope for.

That is how Harper became PM.

No we vote conservative because we are tired of Huge taxes and irrersponsible spending.
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
+1
#127


Everyone knows that budgets balance themselves...with spin cycles.
 
captain morgan
No Party Affiliation
#128
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post


Everyone knows that budgets balance themselves...with spin cycles.

Sunny Ways... Now, maybe lil potato can work on his balance

 
Hoid
#129
How are those polls going?
 
Colpy
Conservative
+1
#130
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

How are those polls going?

As usual, Nanos is outlandishly high for the Liberals.

The aggregate polls have the CPC and Liberals neck and neck.
 
captain morgan
No Party Affiliation
+3
#131
Trudeau has accomplished nothing to date and with the cupboards being bare, he'll be hard pressed to buy many votes in the months prior to the election.

... And he still has lots of time to make more gaffes
 
Decapoda
+3
#132
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Trudeau has accomplished nothing to date and with the cupboards being bare, he'll be hard pressed to buy many votes in the months prior to the election.

... And he still has lots of time to make more gaffes

This is the big problem I think Trudeau has; he has shown Canadians that he has been grossly irresponsible with his reckless deficit spending. He outright lied when he ran on his campaign declaring he would run "a modest short-term deficit" of less than $10 billion for each of the first three years, then balance the budget by 2019. He broke his promise of a revenue neutral middle-class tax cut, he broke his promise about lowering the small business tax rate from 11% to 9%, he broke his promise to lower the debt to GDP ratio, he broke his promise to ensure a "revenue neutral" carbon tax.

With actual deficit spending averaging over 2 and a half times what he promised, and proposed deficits of $18.1 billion for 2018/19, $17.5 billion for 2019/20, and cumulative deficits totalling $72.8 billion over the government’s first mandate and no plans to balance, I find it hard to imagine how he's going to approach Canadians during the next election campaign promising them a whole bunch of new goodies without also giving some clue as to where this money is going to come from.

I think Canadians may have had enough of his lies and gross fiscal irresponsibility, and any attempt to buy votes by going further into debt will not likely sit well with anyone other than low information voters. Combine this with the pending cancellation of the Trans Mountain Pipeline and suspected tax payer bail-out of this project by his Government, and I don't think the winds of fortune are going to be in his favour.

I guess we'll see if Canadians are more interested about a prosperous future, or a shiny, sunny ways present.... financed to the nuts. I guess we'll see how intelligent Canadians really are.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#133
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Trudeau has accomplished nothing to date and with the cupboards being bare, he'll be hard pressed to buy many votes in the months prior to the election.

... And he still has lots of time to make more gaffes

You got that right!
 
mentalfloss
#134
Quote: Originally Posted by Colpy View Post

As usual, Nanos is outlandishly high for the Liberals.

The aggregate polls have the CPC and Liberals neck and neck.

Which neck gets more seats?
 
Colpy
Conservative
+3
#135
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Which neck gets more seats?

We'll see in October, 2019.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+2
#136
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Which neck gets more seats?

Red in June for Ont.

Red Neck get it
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+2
#137
Quote: Originally Posted by Colpy View Post

We'll see in October, 2019.

Any "neck" except Justin's. He's had his chances and have blown them all in spades! He won't f**king listen!
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+1
#138
Quote: Originally Posted by Decapoda View Post

This is the big problem I think Trudeau has; he has shown Canadians that he has been grossly irresponsible with his reckless deficit spending. He outright lied when he ran on his campaign declaring he would run "a modest short-term deficit" of less than $10 billion for each of the first three years, then balance the budget by 2019. He broke his promise of a revenue neutral middle-class tax cut, he broke his promise about lowering the small business tax rate from 11% to 9%, he broke his promise to lower the debt to GDP ratio, he broke his promise to ensure a "revenue neutral" carbon tax.

With actual deficit spending averaging over 2 and a half times what he promised, and proposed deficits of $18.1 billion for 2018/19, $17.5 billion for 2019/20, and cumulative deficits totalling $72.8 billion over the government’s first mandate and no plans to balance, I find it hard to imagine how he's going to approach Canadians during the next election campaign promising them a whole bunch of new goodies without also giving some clue as to where this money is going to come from.

I think Canadians may have had enough of his lies and gross fiscal irresponsibility, and any attempt to buy votes by going further into debt will not likely sit well with anyone other than low information voters. Combine this with the pending cancellation of the Trans Mountain Pipeline and suspected tax payer bail-out of this project by his Government, and I don't think the winds of fortune are going to be in his favour.

I guess we'll see if Canadians are more interested about a prosperous future, or a shiny, sunny ways present.... financed to the nuts. I guess we'll see how intelligent Canadians really are.

But marijuana tax and carbon pricing man .
 
captain morgan
No Party Affiliation
+2
#139
Apparently, the women in Canada aren't buying JT's line of BS.
 
petros
+1
#140
The number of women who define themselves as "feminist" has plummeted.
 
OpposingDigit
#141
The NDP leader has no support nationally and thus Crudeau will have all the left votes.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#142
Is this the only thing JT has left It's Harper's fault for 2019

Tim Harper: A Stephen Harper endorsement of Trump gives the Liberals a foreign policy opening

Quote:

Justin Trudeau has been working assiduously to invoke the ghost of Stephen Harper, but this week the ghost himself appeared, no Liberal conjuring needed.

There was the former prime minister, in a full-page ad in The New York Times, offering a full-throated endorsement of Donald Trump, specifically the U.S. president’s widely-condemned decision to withdraw from the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran and to re-impose sanctions.
“Mr. President, You Are Right About Iran,’’ says the top half of the page, paid for Rafael Bardaji, a former chief of staff to Spanish prime minister José María Aznar. “Mr. President, we the undersigned, stand in complete support of your leadership on Iran.’’
Harper’s name tops the list of 12 signatories, with former Conservative foreign affairs minister John Baird not far behind.
In March, Harper and Aznar made the same argument in an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal, arguing that the 2015 deal provides a roadmap for Iran to realize its nuclear ambitions.
Leaving aside the obvious reticence of any Canadian leader to cheerlead for Trump on any decision, Harper has been consistent in his views on Iran.
They manifested themselves most notably in his ill-advised 2012 move to shutter the Canadian embassy in Tehran.
He has also been consistent in using U.S. media to further a message, in or out of government, most notably in using the same Wall Street Journal to condemn Jean Chretien for not joining George W. Bush’s 2003 misadventure in Iraq.
Harper is not expressing a view different than the position staked out by the party under Andrew Scheer, if public statements by his foreign affairs critic, Erin O’Toole, are any indication. But the party has not officially taken a position and Harper’s intervention makes the former prime minister the story and it allows the Liberals to highlight its support for the deal by taking on Harper.
Just the way they want it and just what Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland did Thursday, taking the opportunity to tell reporters that her government “regrets” the U.S. decision to pull out of an important and useful agreement. She said she discussed ways to move forward without the U.S. participation with her British counterpart Boris Johnson.
Painting Scheer as Harper redux, leading the Harper party, has been a preoccupation with Trudeau, a strategy unveiled at the party’s Halifax convention last month.
Last week, my colleague Susan Delacourt counted seven Harper references from Trudeau in a single question period, but that appears to have been merely a warm-up. Wednesday Trudeau mentioned Harper an even dozen times.
He invoked Harper to criticize him on his performance on the environment, his changes to the Canada Elections Act, his treatment of seniors, his record on the economy and his cuts to the security budget.
Outside the House, he told reporters that Canadian policy on Iran would be crafted in Ottawa, not Washington.
Playing the bogeyman card from the past is a tried-and-true tactic.
Conservatives used Pierre Trudeau’s National Energy Program to keep Alberta a largely Liberal-free zone for years.
Provincially, think of the references to the “Harris Tories,” a frightening image successfully deployed by Ontario Liberals.
Bob Rae is in the bogeyman hall of fame. Harper used memories of his tenure as NDP premier to push back against Jack Layton’s orange wave at the Ontario border in 2011 and we’ll know that provincial NDP Leader Andrea Horwath is a real threat to take power in the current election when Rae’s name starts popping up again.
Rae even used his own bogeyman status in weighing his decision whether to run for the federal Liberal leadership.
That Rae was elected almost 28 years ago does not seem to matter because there is no statute of limitation on invoking the ghosts of leaders past. One keeps invoking the bogeyman until it no longer works.
The strategy of painting Scheer as Harper with a smile may bear fruit because Scheer is still largely unknown and Trudeau is taking the opportunity to brand his opponent ahead of the 2019 election.
But the Conservative leader is hardly as toxic as Harper had become after almost a decade in power, even if the party has not yet moved beyond the Harper era on policy and Scheer’s front bench is dotted with Harper cabinet veterans.
Harper would likely be quite content to have the 2019 vote feature the Liberals taking on his legacy. It remains to be seen how comfortable the current Conservative team would be heading into a battle framed that way.
Tim Harper is a former Star reporter who is a current freelance columnist based in Toronto. Follow him on Twitter: @nutgraf1

Look Harper agrees with Trump if you hate Trump re-elect Libs. because the CPC like Trump fook me slow news day I guess
 
EagleSmack
+2
#143
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Apparently, the women in Canada aren't buying JT's line of BS.

They're tired of his mansplaining and his elbowing.
 
Decapoda
+1
#144
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

They're tired of his mansplaining and his elbowing.

Yeah, but he has a new plan to polish the image...





Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Talking Tribute Portrait Doll


Good grief.
 
spaminator
#145
Quote: Originally Posted by Decapoda View Post

Yeah, but he has a new plan to polish the image...


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Talking Tribute Portrait Doll

Good grief.

does the Justine doll say sorey?
 
Decapoda
+1
#146
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

does the Justine doll say sorey?

Among other things. There's also the classic prefixes Umm, uh, er, uhhh.

It also cries real tears, and comes with a hankey.
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#147
Well it could be a bill clinton hankey, in which case it would be full of real spots

not real tears


but no..In Canada, we get dress socks instead...
 
Vbeacher
+2
#148
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

OH look!

3 people out of 10 now think the conservative party is good

That must mean being a right wing moron is normal.

I bet the right wing morons know enough math to know 40% if 4 out of 10, not 3 out of 10.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
#149
Quote: Originally Posted by Vbeacher View Post

I bet the right wing morons know enough math to know 40% if 4 out of 10, not 3 out of 10.

If ?
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#150
Conservatives steal Liberal riding in Quebec

OTTAWA - The Conservatives have stolen a Quebec riding away from Justin Trudeau's ruling Liberals, in the first test of Andrew Scheer's effort to recreate the nationalist-conservative coalition that helped federal Tories dominate the province in the 1980s.
Conservative candidate Richard Martel captured 52.7 per cent of the vote in a federal byelection held in Chicoutimi-Le Fjord — more than 5,000 votes ahead of Liberal Lina Boivin, who took 29.5 per cent.

The NDP and Bloc Quebecois candidates were not in contention, capturing just 8.7 per cent and 5.6 per cent respectively, while the Green candidate brought up the rear with just 3.1 per cent of the vote.

Just 36 per cent of eligible voters bothered to cast ballots.
The byelection was precipitated by the resignation of rookie Liberal MP Denis Lemieux.
He won the riding almost by fluke in the 2015 general election, with just 31 per cent of the vote. At that time, the contest was a four-way fight, with the NDP capturing 29.7 per cent of the vote, the Bloc taking 20.5 per cent and the Conservatives taking 16.6 per cent.
Boivin's showing Monday was only marginally worse than Lemieux's but there was no longer a split vote for her to benefit from. The Conservatives, who've been assiduously wooing former separatists and soft nationalists in the riding, benefited from the collapse in support for the Bloc and NDP, vaulting from fourth place to first.
Conservative Leader Scheer campaigned in the riding last week with former Bloc leader Michel Gauthier, who urged voters who used to support the separatist party — currently leaderless and in disarray after months of infighting — to switch their allegiance to the Conservatives.

Scheer has also endorsed a number of Quebec-focused policies designed to appeal to erstwhile separatists and soft nationalists — such as allowing Quebec to collect federal taxes on Ottawa’s behalf so that Quebecers would be able to file a single federal-provincial tax return each year, rather than the two they're currently required to file.
As well, Scheer has said he'd give Quebec more power over culture and immigration and has promised to crack down on the influx of irregular refugee claimants, which has become a particular problem at Quebec's Lacolle border crossing.
He made no mention of any of that Monday as he welcomed Martel's byelection victory.
“Quebecers and Canadians are tired of the prime minister’s big deficit and high tax agenda. More and more, they are disappointed by this Liberal government and understand that only the Conservative Party can defend their interests," Scheer said in a written statement.
“Conservatives believe in responsible spending and in lowering taxes to make life more affordable for all Canadians. I look forward to working with Richard to spread our positive Conservative vision for Canada.” Chicoutimi-Le Fjord marks the Liberals' first byelection defeat in a held riding since Trudeau became Liberal leader in 2013. For the Tories, Monday's victory will help make up for the three ridings Trudeau's Liberals have stolen from them in byelections, in addition to one snagged from the NDP.
The byelection comes just as Trudeau is mired in a nasty trade dispute with U.S. President Donald Trump.
The riding is in Quebec's Saguenay region, the heart of the province's aluminum industry.
Trump has imposed a tariff of 10 per cent on aluminum imports and 25 per cent on steel, using national security as the justification. Trudeau has called that "insulting" to Canada and has vowed to slap dollar-for-dollar tariffs on a range of U.S. exports to Canada, starting July 1. Trudeau's stance earned him an unprecedented, personal attack from Trump and his emissaries following the G7 summit in Quebec earlier this month. Trump called the prime minister "weak" and "dishonest" while one of his top aides said there's "a special place in hell" for Trudeau and others who negotiate in bad faith with the president.
While opinion polls suggest Canadians have rallied behind Trudeau, the issue evidently didn't help Liberal fortunes in the byelection.
Canada's supply management system for dairy, eggs and poultry has also been in Trump's crosshairs of late. While Trudeau has vowed to defend the system, his suggestion in a U.S. television interview that he's willing to be "flexible" on the subject has concerned dairy farmers in Quebec, some of whom protested during a campaign stop the prime minister made in Chicoutimi-Le Fjord earlier this month.
Scheer had his own woes over supply management. Last week, he fired one-time leadership rival Maxime Bernier from his post in the Conservative shadow cabinet after Bernier posted on his website a controversial chapter from his forthcoming book.
In that chapter, Bernier, a staunch advocate for dismantling supply management, accuses Scheer of winning the leadership by mobilizing Quebec dairy farmers to ensure Bernier wasn't victorious.
That controversy doesn't appear to have hurt the Conservatives in Monday's byelection.

They bolstered their chances in the riding by choosing Martel as their candidate, a well known junior hockey coach who was easily the highest profile contender in the race. A well known local candidate can be particularly influential in a byelection, when voters know their choice will make no difference to which party forms government.
Chicoutimi-Le Fjord was held by the Bloc from 2004 to 2011, when the NDP snagged the riding as part of the orange wave that swept the province.
Monday's result is more dismal news for NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, whose efforts to re-ignite the party have shown no discernible results so far.
And it doesn't bode well for the NDP in another imminent Quebec byelection once Singh's predecessor, Tom Mulcair, resigns his Montreal seat of Outremont later this month.
 

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