Canadianisms - Unique Words & Expressions


countryboy
#1
One of the things that makes Canada an interesting place is its wide variety of just about everything, including unique words and expressions that exist in different parts of this vast land.

Does anyone know of any of some words/expressions that set our version of English apart from the one spoken in other parts of the world. I'm thinking it might be a fun way to celebrate our differences...

Example: When I first moved to BC, I kept hearing the word "skookum." I had been around the country a lot, but that was a new one on me!
 
lone wolf
#2
Double double
 
AnnaG
#3
This is a skookum topic, CB.
I am not sure if this is strictly a Canuck thing or not but some people apparently speak to topics rather than speaking to people. Whatever happened to "speaking about this topic"?
"Addressing this topic"? What's that? You are sending mail to the topic?
Are we now to start ringing up the topic? Yahooing the topic? IMing the topic? PMing the topic?
Nonsense. I talk to people via the various forms of media. I don't talk to topics. (Sometimes dogs, cats, plants, and other critters, too)
 
AnnaG
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

Double double

I thought that was a Seattle Starbucks thing. lol
 
Kakato
#5
Drug up-newfy expression meaning to up and quit your job.


"Where ya too"?-Where are you?
 
Cliffy
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

I thought that was a Seattle Starbucks thing. lol

I think it is a Timmy's thing.

How come all the teens sound LIKE valley girls?
 
countryboy
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Kakato View Post

Drug up-newfy expression meaning to up and quit your job.


"Where ya too"?-Where are you?

One from the east (don't remember the specific place):
I turned around and there she was, gone!
 
countryboy
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

I think it is a Timmy's thing.

How come all the teens sound LIKE valley girls?

Like, what do you mean?
 
countryboy
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

This is a skookum topic, CB.
I am not sure if this is strictly a Canuck thing or not but some people apparently speak to topics rather than speaking to people. Whatever happened to "speaking about this topic"?
"Addressing this topic"? What's that? You are sending mail to the topic?
Are we now to start ringing up the topic? Yahooing the topic? IMing the topic? PMing the topic?
Nonsense. I talk to people via the various forms of media. I don't talk to topics. (Sometimes dogs, cats, plants, and other critters, too)

Having said that (!), my brother gets irritated by people turning nouns into verbs...I kind of like it myself. I have go and "action" the dish detergent...
 
Ron in Regina
#10
Canadianism: One person runs their shopping cart into the heels of the person
in front of them. Both apologize to each other. Witnessing this behaviour let
my Daughter-in-Law know she wasn't still residing in her country of her birth.

 
countryboy
#11
Has anyone ever clearly defined "over yonder" ? Prairie folks might relate best to this one, especially those from farms. I take it to mean "over there"...
 
countryboy
#12
Overheard in an bar down east somewhere...

"Stay where you're at and I'll come where you're to."

Could have been Newfoundland...all I remember it was in a bar...(at least, I think I remember that...)
 
AnnaG
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboy View Post

One from the east (don't remember the specific place):
I turned around and there she was, gone!

That's either a Newfie or a New Scottish thing. lol It also works with inanimate objects like levels, wrenches, keys, etc. There they were, gone.
 
countryboy
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

That's either a Newfie or a New Scottish thing. lol It also works with inanimate objects like levels, wrenches, keys, etc. There they were, gone.

Good point...in fact, I think the person in the bar was telling a story about how he lost his car! (..."she" was gone!)...
 
Kakato
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboy View Post

Overheard in an bar down east somewhere...

"Stay where you're at and I'll come where you're to."

Could have been Newfoundland...all I remember it was in a bar...(at least, I think I remember that...)

I've been trying to remember that one for the last hour.
Lots of easterners on the pipeline so I heard it lots.
 
AnnaG
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboy View Post

Has anyone ever clearly defined "over yonder" ? Prairie folks might relate best to this one, especially those from farms. I take it to mean "over there"...

Yup. It means "over there". There's an old saying that means "everywhere" and it goes something like "here, hither, and yon", too. I think it's related.
 
Mowich
#17
Not sure if this is Canadian or not but my ex used it a lot.

"Let's blow this pop stand."
 
Ron in Regina
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboy View Post

Has anyone ever clearly defined "over yonder" ? Prairie folks might relate best to this one, especially those from farms. I take it to mean "over there"...


"over yonder" means within your line of sight. It takes on a special meaning
when your line of sight is only interrupted by the curvature of the earth...
 
AnnaG
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboy View Post

Overheard in an bar down east somewhere...

"Stay where you're at and I'll come where you're to."

Could have been Newfoundland...all I remember it was in a bar...(at least, I think I remember that...)

I think it makes more sense if you add another "o" on the end of the last word. "Stay where you are and I'll come where you are, too" as in "also".
 
Kakato
#20
Pass me a tum wrench meboy.
 
Mowich
#21
Don't get your girdle in a knot, was a favorite with my Dad.
 
#juan
#22
Beats da sh it outa me... (I don't know)
 
Mowich
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboy View Post

Has anyone ever clearly defined "over yonder" ? Prairie folks might relate best to this one, especially those from farms. I take it to mean "over there"...

Us prairie folk also used 'the back 40' a lot.
 
lone wolf
#24
Hang a (insert direction here)
 
Kakato
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Us prairie folk also used 'the back 40' a lot.

Stuck out in the toolies.
 
AnnaG
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Kakato View Post

Pass me a tum wrench meboy.

Crescent wrench?
 
Kakato
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

Crescent wrench?

Yup,took 3 days to figure out what "where ya too" meant and five for da thumb wrench.

I allmost needed an interperter when i worked pipeline,half the time I had no idea what they were saying.
 
AnnaG
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Kakato View Post

Yup,took 3 days to figure out what "where ya too" meant and five for da thumb wrench.

I allmost needed an interperter when i worked pipeline,half the time I had no idea what they were saying.

lmao
I know what you mean. There's one guy out here that speaks relatively lucidly, but if coaxed into it he can let out a spiel in which maybe one in 20 words is recognizable. lol
It's just freakin hilarious.
 
AnnaG
#29
Speaking of tum wrenches; hubby calls them "knucklebusters". According to him if you put enough pressure on them, they let go of the bolt and your knuckles take a bashing.
 
Kakato
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

lmao
I know what you mean. There's one guy out here that speaks relatively lucidly, but if coaxed into it he can let out a spiel in which maybe one in 20 words is recognizable. lol
It's just freakin hilarious.

Get 5 of them in a crew cab hopped up on double doubles and it gets pretty wild.

While in the Arctic I had a Caper,Newfy and New Brunswicker as tent mates for 7 weeks at a time,now that was interesting,I had no idea how much of a rivalry they had going back east.

Newfy-"I thought you said ya could cut hair ya squid jigger"

Caper-"No cod gobbler,I said I would cut your hair"

As he shaved his head bald.
 

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