Schools Gonna Be In Session Soon


Curiosity
#1
I've been wondering what Canadian parents are expected to provide for their child's school use....

Are they given a list of things to buy or bring to school during those first days? Is there a dress code?
Is there cash involved to pay up front for special projects? I'd love to hear from some 'old hands' at the first days of school.

I have no idea of any 'first day' for me except the very very first day when my dad dragged me up the steps of the elementary school..... it was like a prison to me.... I have no idea what I had to bring either.
 
tamarin
#2
Curiosity, school starts here in mid-August. All the kiddies are sent for two weeks of intensive sensitivity training so that little chance of offence occurs once regular classes commence in September. Sessions are steered by well paid social science graduates who to their credit also host courses for all government workers, police and justice officials. It's a remarkable experiment in social engineering. Should put us ahead of Sweden in a few years.
 
Curiosity
#3
LOL Good one Tamarin

 
Curiosity
#4
Tamarin

I was truly disappointed there was no refrigerator in the classroom which I could visit whenever I felt like it at home.... they should rethink things for 'snackers'....
 
triedit
#5
Both in the states and here we were given a list the first day which generally included a few folders, pencils, backpack, and a box of kleenex to share with the class as the year progresses. Unless you are in a uniform school or a high school there probably arent really dress codes--more like just using good sense. Once in high school there will be limits on revealing clothing, loose clothing, and slogan tshirts likely.

My son's kindergarden also had him provide a pair of Indoor shoes to change into for the day.

School usually starts in mid August and in the states and the day after labor day in Canada so far as I can tell. My sister's kids go back in just three weeks while my son has a full six weeks.
 
tamarin
#6
It's been a long time since I was in an elementary school yard. Yet my memories are positive. We got a great education. There were drawbacks but one thing was clear: school had a purpose. It was achieved.
 
triedit
#7
Oh and I forgot. Sometimes there is a small fee but Ive never seen one over $25 in primary school and $100 in high school.
 
karrie
#8
I'm in the Catholic school system. The supply list includes markers and pencil crayons and pastels and wax crayons, pencils and highlighters, scissors.

It also cost me $110 each for school fees when I preregistered my kids in the fall.

$27 a month, per kid for bussing.

New shoes with white soles.

Roughly speaking just to start school costs me almost $300 per child, and they are in grades 1 and 2.
 
triedit
#9
Eek. I don't spend nearly that much! I spent lots more here than in the US though. We're quite close to the school so we don't need bussing (this was free in the states) and Ive only done kindergarten and grades 8 and 9 here...
 
Curiosity
#10
The last few weeks in July there are great clothing drives too - for gently used or new clothing for the kids returning to school who have outgrown last year's and can't afford much ...

We were down there early in the week and you should see some of the nice things people are bringing - the kids hardly wear out their clothes except their favorite jeans and a couple of special shirts.

I love that they enjoy sharing and the kids who get to pick out new outfits (gently used) are thrilled.

It's the list of school supplies that craters the poor. The families who can afford it don't mind but some of the purchases run into $50 or $60 - that's a huge amount for those in poverty. There are some donated school supplies but I think they should be included along with the clothing. Maybe next year.

Do moms still cry the first day? Dads? Sorry I know it's personal but I love to see the waves and goodbyes... everyone has a different way of making it happen...
 
tamarin
#11
No need for good-byes anymore. Just give junior a cellphone and he can let mom and pop know about all about his experiences during recess. It's a great social control tool. And if mom or dad is prone to mania it should make the school administrator's day interesting too.
 
karrie
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Curiosity View Post


It's the list of school supplies that craters the poor. The families who can afford it don't mind but some of the purchases run into $50 or $60 - that's a huge amount for those in poverty. There are some donated school supplies but I think they should be included along with the clothing. Maybe next year.

Do moms still cry the first day? Dads? Sorry I know it's personal but I love to see the waves and goodbyes... everyone has a different way of making it happen...

I've seen people refuse to pay for school supplies. In Canada, it's law that they give you an education ( a lawyer in BC is actually taking the system to court, as fees and supply lists are in violation of our right to an education regardless of income). So, when people refuse to buy supplies and pay fees, the school covers it with the absolute minimum.

And I only cried on my kids' very first days of Kindergarten. My kids are so sure of themselves, so excited, it's not really a sad moment when they start a new year of school.
 
karrie
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by tamarin View Post

No need for good-byes anymore. Just give junior a cellphone and he can let mom and pop know about all about his experiences during recess. It's a great social control tool. And if mom or dad is prone to mania it should make the school administrator's day interesting too.

I like the use of the cell phones I've seen leaving the public school near here.

The older kids who are walking wait, and let all the younger kids gather. Then they phone their destination point, and let them know they've got everyone and are leaving the school on their way home. Everyone all walks together, and at least some adult knows where all these kids are at.
 
Curiosity
#14
Oh I wouldn't like a cell phone - or can you manage one and still throw snowballs?

The way schools are these days I would probably have been sent to a special school for monster children.
 
karrie
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Curiosity View Post

Oh I wouldn't like a cell phone - or can you manage one and still throw snowballs?

The way schools are these days I would probably have been sent to a special school for monster children.

lol. that's what the backpacks are for... call mom and dad, pop the cell in the pocket, and commence snowball fight.
 
Curiosity
#16
LOL Karrie - A modern convenience - backpack!

I'd probably store snowballs in there too....those eight blocks walking home were an exercise in terror depending on the size of the boys .... if one ventured unarmed.... watch out! I almost hated to see the snow melt.
 
triedit
#17
I cry every year....on the LAST day of school.

But yeah, it's a given for both moms and dads with kindergarden.
 
Zan
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by triedit View Post

I cry every year....on the LAST day of school.

But yeah, it's a given for both moms and dads with kindergarden.

lolll - reminds me of that STAPLE'S commercial.... background music is "It's the most wonderful time of the year..." and the Dad is cavorting and skipping through the aisles at Staples tossing school supplies in the cart while the kids are glumly following behind.
Yer right triedit, after kindergarten and grade 1, it's the last day of school we dread, not the first.

Hey Karrie - you might wanna check your kids' school policy on snowball fights. My son was sent home with a warning note for throwing a snowball on school property. Not even at a kid... just at the school wall.

The rule of thumb for these politically correct times seems to be: If it's any fun at all, it's probably not allowed.
 
Curiosity
#19
Zan

Thank you thank you - I now have an excuse to blame my evil self on.... throwing snowballs while young and impressionable hahaha....

Ah....that feels good.
 

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