food rationing in the USA


quandary121
Green
#1
This week has begun to experience a once unthinkable phenomenon--food rationing in the USA. Many stores and retailers are limiting purchases of flour, rice, wheat, cooking oil, and other commodities. How did we get into this mess? And it's not limited to the USA--we are also hearing of GLOBAL HUNGER and RIOTS because of lack of food and high food prices, including in countries such as Japan, Haiti, Indonesia, and several African nations
 
quandary121
Green
#2
The USA is like living in a third world country for more and more Americans. So much poverty and unfairness, but they still spend billions on their military and aid abroad. It helps that a lot of Americans are so ignorant and blindingly patriotic so things never change.
 
quandary121
Green
#3
More at http://therealnews.com/c.ph...
Two warehouse supermarket chains limit rice sales as concern grows over speculation on food markets
 
unclepercy
#4
Sorry, but you don't know what you are talking about. Just a few days ago, they were giving 20 lb. bags of rice away as grand opening gifts. It was an Oriental grocery store. Don't believe everything you read. I have seen NO shortage in any of the stores I shop.

Uncle
 
gerryh
#5
Reality plays no roll in his world unc.
 
quandary121
Green
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by unclepercy View Post

Sorry, but you don't know what you are talking about. Just a few days ago, they were giving 20 lb. bags of rice away as grand opening gifts. It was an Oriental grocery store. Don't believe everything you read. I have seen NO shortage in any of the stores I shop.

Uncle


Speculative Surge in Grain Prices
The media has casually misled public opinion on the causes of these price hikes, focusing almost exclusively on issues of costs of production, climate and other factors which result in reduced supply and which might contribute to boosting the price of food staples. While these factors may come into play, they are of limited relevance in explaining the impressive and dramatic surge in commodity prices.
Spiraling food prices are in large part the result of market manipulation. They are largely attributable to speculative trade on the commodity markets. Grain prices are boosted artificially by large scale speculative operations on the New York and Chicago mercantile exchanges. It is worth noting that in 2007, the Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT), merged with the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME), forming the largest Worldwide entity dealing in commodity trade including a wide range of speculative instruments (options, options on futures, index funds, etc).
Speculative trade in wheat, rice or corn, can occur without the occurrence of real commodity transactions. The institutions speculating in the grain market are not necessarily involved in the actual selling or delivery of grain.

The transactions may use commodity index funds which are bets on the general upward or downward movement of commodity prices. A "put option" is a bet that the price will go down, a "call option" is a bet that the price will go up. Through concerted manipulation, institutional traders and financial institutions make the price go up and then place their bets on an upward movement in the price of a particular commodity.

Speculation generates market volatility. In turn, the resulting instability encourages further speculative activity.
Profits are made when the price goes up. Conversely, if the speculator is short-selling the market, money will be made when the price collapses.
This recent speculative surge in food prices has been conducive to a Worldwide process of famine formation on an unprecedented scale.
 
quandary121
Green
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by unclepercy View Post

Sorry, but you don't know what you are talking about. Just a few days ago, they were giving 20 lb. bags of rice away as grand opening gifts. It was an Oriental grocery store. Don't believe everything you read. I have seen NO shortage in any of the stores I shop.

Uncle:roll:

The Deregulation of Grain Markets
Since the 1980s, grain markets have been deregulated under the supervision of the World Bank and US/EU grain surpluses are used systematically to destroy the peasantry and destabilize national food agriculture. In this regard, World Bank lending requires the lifting of trade barriers on imported agricultural staples, leading to the dumping of US/EU grain surpluses onto local market. These and other measures have spearheaded local agricultural producers into bankruptcy.
A "free market" in grain --imposed by the IMF and the World Bank-- destroys the peasant economy and undermines "food security". Malawi and Zimbabwe were once prosperous grain surplus countries, Rwanda was virtually self-sufficient in food until 1990 when the IMF ordered the dumping of EU and US grain surpluses on the domestic market precipitating small farmers into bankruptcy. In 1991-92, famine had hit Kenya, East Africa's most successful bread-basket economy. The Nairobi government had been previously placed on a black list for not having obeyed IMF prescriptions. The deregulation of the grain market had been demanded as one of the conditions for the rescheduling of Nairobi's external debt with the Paris Club of official creditors. (Michel Chossudovsky, The Globalization of Poverty and the New World Order, Second Edition, Montreal 2003)
Throughout Africa, as well as in Southeast Asia and Latin America, the pattern of "sectoral adjustment" in agriculture under the custody of the Bretton Woods institutions has been unequivocally towards the destruction of food security. Dependency vis-ΰ-vis the world market has been reinforced leading to a boost in commercial grain imports as well as an increase in the influx of "food aid".
Agricultural producers were encouraged to abandon food farming and switch into "high value" export crops. often to the detriment of food self-sufficiency. The high value products as well as the cash crops for export were supported by World Bank loans.
Famines in the age of globalization are the result of policy. Famine is not the consequence of a scarcity of food but in fact quite the opposite: global food surpluses are used to destabilize agricultural production in developing countries.
Tightly regulated and controlled by international agro-business, this oversupply is ultimately conducive to the stagnation of both production and consumption of essential food staples and the impoverishment of farmers throughout the world. Moreover, in the era of globalization, the IMF-World Bank structural adjustment program bears a direct relationship to the process of famine formation because it systematically undermines all categories of economic activity, whether urban or rural, which do not directly serve the interests of the global market system.
The earnings of farmers in rich and poor countries alike are squeezed by a handful of global agro-industrial enterprises which simultaneously control the markets for grain, farm inputs, seeds and processed foods. One giant firm Cargill Inc. with more than 140 affiliates and subsidiaries around the World controls a large share of the international trade in grain. Since the 1950s, Cargill became the main contractor of US "food aid" funded under Public Law 480 (1954).
World agriculture has for the first time in history the capacity to satisfy the food requirements of the entire planet, yet the very nature of the global market system prevents this from occurring. The capacity to produce food is immense yet the levels of food consumption remain exceedingly low because a large share of the World's population lives in conditions of abject poverty and deprivation. Moreover, the process of "modernization" of agriculture has led to the dispossession of the peasantry, increased landlessness and environmental degradation. In other words, the very forces which encourage global food production to expand are also conducive antithetically to a contraction in the standard of living and a decline in the demand for food.
 
quandary121
Green
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryh View Post

Reality plays no roll in his world unc.


A sharp tongue is no indication of a keen mind.
Don't get insulted, but is your job devoted to spreading ignorance?
 
FUBAR
#9
And a smart arse is still just something to sit on grasshopper
 
quandary121
Green
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by FUBAR View Post

And a smart arse is still just something to sit on grasshopper


Don't mind him. He has a soft heart and a head to match.
Some drink from the fountain of knowledge, but he just gargled.
 
unclepercy
#11
I don't care how many articles you can find on Google, it doesn't reflect what is actually going on the in the USA. If you can't speak from personal experience, then it is better left
unsaid. I NEVER say such things about Canada because I am not a citizen.

Sunday, I went to a well-known Texas grocery store, and things were picked over by the weekend shoppers. Today, Monday, at 10:00 am, the store was fully stocked with extra goods stacked to the ceiling. Yes, prices are up, but there is NO stortage. There is much waste, though.

From the Dallas Morning News:

1. "In Sweden, families with small children threw out about a quarter of the food they bought."
2. "Americans waste an astonishing amount of food - an estimated 27%."
3. "In England, a recent study revealed that the Britons toss away a third of the food they purchase."

Now fill us in on how much food Canada wastes and how that relates to food shortages.

Uncle
 
quandary121
Green
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by unclepercy View Post

I don't care how many articles you can find on Google, it doesn't reflect what is actually going on the in the USA. If you can't speak from personal experience, then it is better left
unsaid. I NEVER say such things about Canada because I am not a citizen.

Sunday, I went to a well-known Texas grocery store, and things were picked over by the weekend shoppers. Today, Monday, at 10:00 am, the store was fully stocked with extra goods stacked to the ceiling. Yes, prices are up, but there is NO stortage. There is much waste, though.

From the Dallas Morning News:

1. "In Sweden, families with small children threw out about a quarter of the food they bought."
2. "Americans waste an astonishing amount of food - an estimated 27%."
3. "In England, a recent study revealed that the Britons toss away a third of the food they purchase."

Now fill us in on how much food Canada wastes and how that relates to food shortages.

Uncle

Look if you think just cos you can still buy food in your local store that this equates to how the worlds resources are then you must walk around with you eyes and ears closed the current impact of grain prices around the world impacts on us all (farming animal feeds) many sources of information on global famine caused by this fact are spreading around in the news and elsewhere just because the western world throws away unprecedented amounts of food proves nothing but the ignorance of said cultures your inability to see this is inexcusable
 
quandary121
Green
#13
Speculative Surge in Grain Prices
The media has casually misled public opinion on the causes of these price hikes, focusing almost exclusively on issues of costs of production, climate and other factors which result in reduced supply and which might contribute to boosting the price of food staples. While these factors may come into play, they are of limited relevance in explaining the impressive and dramatic surge in commodity prices.
Spiraling food prices are in large part the result of market manipulation. They are largely attributable to speculative trade on the commodity markets. Grain prices are boosted artificially by large scale speculative operations on the New York and Chicago mercantile exchanges. It is worth noting that in 2007, the Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT), merged with the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME), forming the largest Worldwide entity dealing in commodity trade including a wide range of speculative instruments (options, options on futures, index funds, etc).
Speculative trade in wheat, rice or corn, can occur without the occurrence of real commodity transactions. The institutions speculating in the grain market are not necessarily involved in the actual selling or delivery of grain.

The transactions may use commodity index funds which are bets on the general upward or downward movement of commodity prices. A "put option" is a bet that the price will go down, a "call option" is a bet that the price will go up. Through concerted manipulation, institutional traders and financial institutions make the price go up and then place their bets on an upward movement in the price of a particular commodity.

Speculation generates market volatility. In turn, the resulting instability encourages further speculative activity.
Profits are made when the price goes up. Conversely, if the speculator is short-selling the market, money will be made when the price collapses.
This recent speculative surge in food prices has been conducive to a Worldwide process of famine formation on an unprecedented scale.
 
quandary121
Green
#14
The World Needs Food
Although the response of the government was inadequate, that was not the cause of the problem. Egypt is just one of many countries worldwide, which are being hit by hyperinflationary trends in food products. The cause lies in the insane international economic system, in which speculative funds drive up basic commodities, while globalization agencies like the World Trade Organization, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank et al discourage or even punish production.(1) Add to this the psychotic craze of biofuels, which has further diverted arable land to grow corn for ethanol instead of food or foldder.
The fact that Egypt has been hit by such a crisis, which takes on the ostensible form of a crisis in the supply of bread, is a tragic irony. Earlier, in the 1960s, Egypt had been able to provide wheat, grains etc. to satisfy the needs of its population. This was until the 1990s, when the U.S. intervened to demand that Egypt import wheat from America. The idea at the time was to make Egypt dependant on US wheat and grain shipments, and thus control its policy decisions. As Henry Kissinger had put it, "Control oil and you control nations; control food and you control the people."(2)
Today Egypt produces 8 million tons of wheat per year, which falls far short of the 14 million tons required to feed its 80 million people. The difference is made up by imported wheat from the United States, financed by aid money. This is the source of the subsidized bread, which costs Egypt about $3.1 billion per year. In Sudan, too, where wheat consumption has moved from 600,000 tons in the 1990s, to 2 million now, the country currently provides less than half that amount. The rest must be imported.
 
quandary121
Green
#15
The Deregulation of Grain Markets
Since the 1980s, grain markets have been deregulated under the supervision of the World Bank and US/EU grain surpluses are used systematically to destroy the peasantry and destabilize national food agriculture. In this regard, World Bank lending requires the lifting of trade barriers on imported agricultural staples, leading to the dumping of US/EU grain surpluses onto local market. These and other measures have spearheaded local agricultural producers into bankruptcy.
A "free market" in grain --imposed by the IMF and the World Bank-- destroys the peasant economy and undermines "food security". Malawi and Zimbabwe were once prosperous grain surplus countries, Rwanda was virtually self-sufficient in food until 1990 when the IMF ordered the dumping of EU and US grain surpluses on the domestic market precipitating small farmers into bankruptcy. In 1991-92, famine had hit Kenya, East Africa's most successful bread-basket economy. The Nairobi government had been previously placed on a black list for not having obeyed IMF prescriptions. The deregulation of the grain market had been demanded as one of the conditions for the rescheduling of Nairobi's external debt with the Paris Club of official creditors. (Michel Chossudovsky, The Globalization of Poverty and the New World Order, Second Edition, Montreal 2003)
Throughout Africa, as well as in Southeast Asia and Latin America, the pattern of "sectoral adjustment" in agriculture under the custody of the Bretton Woods institutions has been unequivocally towards the destruction of food security. Dependency vis-ΰ-vis the world market has been reinforced leading to a boost in commercial grain imports as well as an increase in the influx of "food aid".
Agricultural producers were encouraged to abandon food farming and switch into "high value" export crops. often to the detriment of food self-sufficiency. The high value products as well as the cash crops for export were supported by World Bank loans.
 
quandary121
Green
#16
"The world is facing an acute economic crisis that started with the collapse of the US sub-prime (mortgage market) crisis followed by the regression of projected growth rates of global economy. The world is surged with (sic) by rough inflationary waves causing unprecedented hikes [in] prices of energy, basic food commodities and raw materials and imposing the larger portion of its consequences and implications on poor countries and on the poor population within the same country.
 
quandary121
Green
#17
Breaking The Agricultural Cycle

With the widespread adoption of GMO seeds, a major transition has occurred in the structure and history of settled agriculture since its inception 10,000 years ago.

The reproduction of seeds at the village level in local nurseries has been disrupted by the use of genetically modified seeds. The agricultural cycle, which enables farmers to store their organic seeds and plant them to reap the next harvest has been broken. This destructive pattern – invariably resulting in famine – is replicated in country after country leading to the Worldwide demise of the peasant economy.
 
quandary121
Green
#18
It is well known that in order to produce one liter of alcohol for use in car engines, 1.2 liters of fuel oil must be sacrificed. In other words, more fuel than the fuel produced. In addition to the fact that ethanol has become good business for the Bush family, Bush's acolytes, and the oligarchies of several countries, isn't this a way to provoke a greater shortage of food?

Is it by happenstance that the big corporations that trade in food and many investors are speculating with the price of grains, knowing that speculation can lead to the deaths of millions of human beings? According to the United Nations, every five seconds a child dies of hunger or the diseases that accompany hunger.

\Was it pure coincidence that the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank (WB) and the World Trade Organization (WTO) promoted in the so-called Third World the production of food for export, instead of guaranteeing the production of crops that might guarantee food to the people who grow them? In that way, they left the poorest nations at the mercy of world-market prices.


At present, 78 nations in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean have a deficit in their basic food baskets, as a result of the high prices of food and the abandonment of traditional crops.


In 37 of those nations, the situation is particularly difficult. Already there have been demonstrations and the looting of grocery stores and supermarkets. Also repression and death. Lest you've forgotten, hunger is the worst counselor.


Some countries have rationed rice; others, corn and wheat. The big Asian producers of rice, such as Thailand and Vietnam, have reduced their exports to guarantee domestic consumption. About 43 percent of the production of corn is used for the feeding of animals. Experts say that about 20 percent of the world's harvest of corn will be used for the production of ethanol. What's left for human beings?
 
quandary121
Green
#19
Quote:

US shops ration food for first time

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The Times | April 24, 2008

US RETAIL giant Wal-Mart is rationing rice sales to protect dwindling supplies as the global price skyrockets and producers such as Australia struggle to keep up with demand.
The drastic move is the first time that food rationing has been introduced in the US.
Growing appetites in China and India, drought in Australia and pests in Vietnam have contributed to the rice shortage and soaring prices.
Hoarding by Asian farmers and rice dealers has sparked clampdowns by authorities there who are worried about getting subsidised rice to the poor.
While Americans suffered some rationing during World War II for items such as petrol, light bulbs and stockings, they have never had to limit consumption of a key food item.

In Britain, where Wal-Mart owns Asda supermarkets, rice is being rationed by shopkeepers in Asian neighbourhoods to prevent hoarding.
Tilda, the biggest importer of basmati rice, said that its buyers — who sell to the curry and Chinese restaurant trade as well as to families — were restricting customers to two bags per person.
“It is happening in the cash-and-carries,” said Jonathan Calland, a company executive. “I heard from our sales force that one lady went into a cash-and-carry and tried to buy eight 20kg bags.”

Wal-Mart said that Sam’s Club, its wholesale business, which sells food to restaurants and other retailers, had limited each customer to four bags of long-grain white rice per visit.
In the past three months wholesalers have experienced a sharp rise in demand for food items such as wheat, rice and milk as businesses stocked up to protect themselves against rising prices.

Global rice prices have more than doubled in the past year partly because countries such as China and India — whose economies are booming — are buying more food from abroad.
At the same time, key rice producers banned exports of rice to ensure that their own people could continue to afford to buy the staple: India, China, Vietnam and Egypt have all blocked exports and so demand for rice from countries such as the US has increased.

Costco Wholesale, the largest warehouse operator in the US, said this week that demand for rice and flour had risen, with customers panicking about shortages and hoarded produce.

Tim Johnson, of the California Rice Commission, said: “This is unprecedented. Americans — particularly in states such as California — have on occasion walked into a supermarket after a natural disaster and seen that the shelves are less full than usual, but we have never experienced this.”

Food prices across the world have rocketed in the past two years, driven by increased demand for corn — the grain that is fermented to produce ethanol, the biofuel. With corn a main foodstock in dairy farming, milk has doubled in price in two years.
The Times

unclepercy do a google search your self and then tell me i dont know what im talking about ok
 
quandary121
Green
#20
once more you fail to see further then the end of your nose unclepercy just because you can buy it now does not mean that you will be able to buy it later this is just starting to take effect around the world and maybe it has not reached you yet but just wait and see then start your debate with me about what is really going on
 
quandary121
Green
#21
British shopkeepers and the US retailer Wal-Mart have rationed rice sales to protect dwindling supplies.
The move by the world’s biggest retailer, which owns Asda, constitutes the first time that food rationing has been introduced in the US. While Americans suffered some rationing during the Second World War for items such as petrol, light bulbs and stockings, they have never had to limit consumption of a key food item.
In Britain rice is being rationed by shopkeepers in Asian neighbourhoods to prevent hoarding. Tilda, the biggest importer of basmati rice, said that its buyers — who sell to the curry and Chinese restaurant trade as well as to families — were restricting customers to two bags per person. “It is happening in the cash-and-carries,” said Jonathan Calland, a company executive. “I heard from our sales force that one lady went into a cash-and-carry and tried to buy eight 20kg bags.”
Wal-Mart said that Sam’s Club, its wholesale business, which sells food to restaurants and other retailers, had limited each customer to four bags of long-grain white rice per visit. In the past three months wholesalers have experienced a sharp rise in demand for food items such as wheat, rice and milk as businesses stocked up to protect themselves against rising prices.
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Global rice prices have more than doubled in the past year partly because countries such as China and India — whose economies are booming — are buying more food from abroad. At the same time, key rice producers banned exports of rice to ensure that their own people could continue to afford to buy the staple: India, China, Vietnam and Egypt have all blocked exports and so demand for rice from countries such as the United States has increased.
Costco Wholesale, the largest warehouse operator in America, said this week that demand for rice and flour had risen, with customers panicking about shortages and hoarded produce.
Tim Johnson, of the California Rice Commission, said: “This is unprecedented. Americans — particularly in states such as California — have on occasion walked into a supermarket after a natural disaster and seen that the shelves are less full than usual, but we have never experienced this.”
Food prices across the world have rocketed in the past two years, driven by increased demand for corn — the grain that is fermented to produce ethanol, the biofuel. With corn a main foodstock in dairy farming, milk has doubled in price in two years.
Growing awareness of global food shortages have exposed a deep divide in Europe over how best to guarantee supplies.
Germany joined France yesterday in demanding that the European Union maintain huge subsidies paid to farmers. The EU pays €42 billion (£34 billion) a year to farmers through the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). Britain has called for its removal, claiming that it distorts the food market at vast expense to taxpayers. Berlin argued that the global food scare showed the need for subsidies to continue beyond 2013, when reforming nations, led by Britain, want to scrap payments that prop up unviable farms.
In a further assault on Britain’s policy of liberalisation, German ministers also backed French opposition to Peter Mandelson’s direction of world trade talks. The Trade Commissioner is offering cuts in EU farm subsidies to trigger concessions from other trading blocs, but Paris and Berlin believe that he has gone too far in chasing a global deal at a time of protectionist pressures.
Under a concession won in 2005 by Tony Blair in exchange for a cut in Britain’s EU rebate, an EU budget review will begin this year. Farm payments in the form of the CAP budget and the €10 billion rural development budget are up for debate.
Germany said that a rush to cut subsidies could leave the EU unable to feed itself. “We have to make sure that we can provide this continent with food sustainability and make sure that we produce enough to combat poverty in the developing world,” Horst Seehofer, the German Agriculture Minister, said.
President Sarkozy of France has pledged to reform the CAP but has yet to give details and is under immense pressure from farmers to continue their handouts. Mr Seehofer added: “In the future we will have food conflicts . . . and we have to make sure that the population here is fed at prices that are affordable. Food security is a demand of our population.”
British diplomats in Brussels dismissed the food security argument. “You cannot spend 45 per cent of the EU budget on 5 per cent of the population who produce 3 per cent of the EU’s output,” one said.
 
quandary121
Green
#22
It takes 9 gallons of fossil fuel to make 10 gallons of Ethenol.

400 pounds of corn to make 25 gallons of Ethenol.

47% of the American diet consists of corn. (What we eat, eats corn, meat, milk eggs ,etc)

It takes 10 calories of fossil fuels to put 1 calorie of food on the American table.
 
quandary121
Green
#23
Quote:

Many parts of America, long considered the breadbasket of the world, are now confronting a once unthinkable phenomenon: food rationing.
Major retailers in New York, in areas of New England, and on the West Coast are limiting purchases of flour, rice, and cooking oil as demand outstrips supply. There are also anecdotal reports that some consumers are hoarding grain stocks.
At a Costco Warehouse in Mountain View, Calif., yesterday, shoppers grew frustrated and occasionally uttered expletives as they searched in vain for the large sacks of rice they usually buy.
"Where's the rice?" an engineer from Palo Alto, Calif., Yajun Liu, said. "You should be able to buy something like rice. This is ridiculous."
Read the whole story here.

more evidence
 
I think not
#24
quandry, I think you need to post more of your opinions and less of the endless posts I'm sure nobody is bothering to sift through.

Do as you wish of course, but personally, it turns me off reading all this stuff when I would much rather you post YOUR opinion.
 
quandary121
Green
#25
Quote:

Run on rice makes its way to U.S.

Worried about rising prices worldwide, customers have been stocking up, prompting sales limits.By Jerry Hirsch and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
April 24, 2008
The global run on food that has led to shortages and riots in Egypt, Haiti and other nations has made its way to U.S. shores.

Concerned about rising prices and limited supplies of staples such as rice and flour, customers across the country have been cleaning out the shelves at big-box retailers, including Wal-Mart Stores Inc.'s Sam's Club and Costco Wholesale Corp. stores.

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On Wednesday, Sam's Club said customers would no longer be allowed to purchase more than four bags of jasmine, basmati or long-grain white rice on each visit.

Sam's Club blamed the restriction on "supply and demand trends" and said it was working with suppliers "to ensure we are in stock."

The policy involves only bags weighing 20 pounds or more and does not affect smaller packages sold at the store or its sister Wal-Mart outlets.

This week, Costco said it had seen sales of flour, rice and some cooking oils leap. Some Costco stores already have held customers to just two bags of rice a day, but the chain doesn't plan to limit sales nationwide.

By midafternoon Wednesday, the Costco in Alhambra -- which had not placed limits on purchases -- said it had run out of rice.

Earlier in the day, Michael Yang, manager of Hawaiian barbecue restaurants in Pico Rivera and West Covina, had decided it was time to stock up. He bought 46 bags of medium-grain rice, 50 pounds each, at the Alhambra Costco and loaded them into his white van.

He paid $15.39 each, which he called a bargain compared with premium brands from Thailand that have recently nearly doubled in price to $40 for a 50-pound bag.

"The price of everything -- oil, sugar -- has been going up for months, and rice has been an issue for a few weeks already. Everyone else is doing the same thing I am because they use up their rice so fast," Yang said in Mandarin.

Prices for many foods, including beer, bread, coffee, pizza and rice, are rising rapidly as the nation contends with its worst bout of food inflation since 1990. The cost of groceries is climbing at an annual rate of about 5% this year.

Retail experts said there was little evidence of "panic" hoarding by the public. It appears that restaurants and smaller retailers have been buying up most of the stock on the expectation that prices will continue to rise.

Still, shoppers' actions have taken some stores by surprise.

"It is like a run on the bank. We don't think there is a shortage, it is just increased shopping by customers who think there is," said Richard Galanti, Costco's chief financial officer. For now, the retailer is allowing managers of stores with short supplies to set their own rules.

Other retailers report adequate supplies.

"Ralphs has plenty of rice. No shortages at any of our stores," said Terry O'Neil, spokesman for Ralphs Grocery Co.

When Heidi Diep visited the Costco in Alhambra last week seeking rice for her Chinese fast-food restaurant in Silver Lake, the store was out of stock. It had plenty of rice when Diep went back Wednesday, but, thanks to shoppers like Diep and Yang, ran out again.

"I picked up as much as I could," Diep said as she hauled a dozen 50-pound bags of Super Lucky Elephant rice and 10 bags of 25-pound long grain into her van and her sister's sedan.

The businesswoman said she was stockpiling the grain to avoid future price increases and a repeat of the week when it couldn't be found.

Internationally, shortages of basic commodities -- including rice, wheat and some oils -- have led to protests and riots in recent months, prompting concern about food security in many poor countries.

even more proof
 
quandary121
Green
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not View Post

quandry, I think you need to post more of your opinions and less of the endless posts I'm sure nobody is bothering to sift through.

Do as you wish of course, but personally, it turns me off reading all this stuff when I would much rather you post YOUR opinion.

Fair point i just like to back up what i say that's all ,i understand that my opinion is probably what is called for here, and realise that endless cutting and pasting is not what is important, it is just that would i be taken seriously, if i spoke on a subject without first making sure what I'm saying is the truth then i could understand your concerns. This said my views on this my be extreme and seen as conspiratorial, as i believe that the USA and British governments have decided for us that the planet has too many people on it and that because nuclear war is not practical or profitable there is an underlying proposal to lessen the world population to under 500 million, measures to make this happen have been under way for over 70 years or more and many contributing factors to enable this to take place are already being implicated, i believe that the USA government and the British governments know of or have had contact with what can only be explained as ALIENS. These Aliens will in the next few years will soon be shown as saving us from our own demise , also within 20 years the governments will tell us that they have been in contact with Aliens for many years, and that they are here to help this i think will fool most of the worlds population as things will soon get worse and worse for all, and then along will come these extraterrestrial beings, they will arrive with what will be perceived as the answer to all our energy needs, and other wondrous technologies , i can hear you all saying this guy should take off his tinfoil hat and are laughing at the utter implausibility of what Ive said, all conspiracy theories are just that until they are proved to be facts !!!!there are things recorded in past historical documents about alien contact before
(the Nephilim are one of these contacts that im talking about)
Quote:

There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare children to them, the same became mighty men which were of old, men of renown.

Quote:

Their descendents, called Nephilim (translated "giants"), were monsters of iniquity; and being superhuman in size and in their wicked character, had to be destroyed. Was this the one and only object of the Flood?

Antediluvian Giants' bone below




 
quandary121
Green
#27
 
quandary121
Green
#28
Mesopotamia
Cities, Wheels, Writing, Religion, Helmets
Cities
In 5000 B.C. Sumerians built villages. All the villages were near rivers. The farmers of Sumer settled on land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. Living by rivers had good and bad parts. The good part is they built canals so the crops could get their water. The bad part is it flooded and the villages were destroyed and so were the crops. The water tore apart the crops and rushed them this way and that way. Many lives were lost.

First Wheel

The Sumerians first invented the wheel. The wheel is a cylinder shaped object that rolls fairly easily. The first wheel was made from clay, rock and mud. I'm not sure sure if the first wheel was made on purpose or by mistake.


Writing, Religion, Helmet
Summarians invented writing. The first writing is called cuneiform. Cuneiform was written on clay. If they messed up, they could start over by rolling the clay up and starting again. The Summarians were first to believe in a religion. They believed in an afterlife. They sometimes buried the dead with tools, their horse, soldiers, and food on a golden platter. For food they would put a lamb or whatever was big enough. The golden helmet was made for wars. They had a helmet to protect their head. They melted the gold and formed it into the helmet.
 
unclepercy
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not View Post

quandry, I think you need to post more of your opinions and less of the endless posts I'm sure nobody is bothering to sift through.

Do as you wish of course, but personally, it turns me off reading all this stuff when I would much rather you post YOUR opinion.

I agree, and how I wish our friend "the bull" were here to take on this delusional rice cake.

Uncle
 
quandary121
Green
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by unclepercy View Post

I agree, and how I wish our friend "the bull" were here to take on this delusional rice cake.

Uncle

look you obviously have taken offence at me for pointing out to you, that because you see no rationing in your local shops what im saying is crap, well its in the news now about the growing price of grain and such like ,maybe i was a head of you in this and that is why your soo peeved ,whether or not you believe my posts is irrelevant, things will only get worse as the oil shortages start to take effect and the snowball that that will create will be dramatic, i can assure you
 

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