Gerald Stanley Not Guilty


petros
+4
#631
That shit recently got one person here tossed.
 
Danbones
-1
#632
So palistine where the actual semites is is for the zionists who are not semites...i though palistien never existed.
OO
lol, Not much point in hanging in clown land with you gretas.

You genocidal racist retards deserve your own forum.

Seven counties in seven years...


see ya round sleeperz...ya coward.
 
petros
+3
#633
It's the repetition. He heard it the first time. That's what bothers people.
 
JLM
#634
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

That shit recently got one person here tossed.


MHz?
 
DaSleeper
+2
#635
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

MHz?

Naaah I think he mean turning every thread into his pet anti jew fixation!
The thread is about stanley , not the muddled east!
 
Girth
#636
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

So palistine where the actual semites is is for the zionists who are not semites...i though palistien never existed.
OO
lol, Not much point in hanging in clown land with you gretas.
You genocidal racist retards deserve your own forum.
Seven counties in seven years...
see ya round sleeperz...ya coward.

The mentally ill, one-trick pony is back.

Dan always derails threads with his bizarre antisemitic posts.

Dan, can you please go away? Nobody understands your garbage posts anyway.
Last edited by Girth; 4 weeks ago at 02:18 PM..
 
Twin_Moose
+2
#637
Colten Boushie’s family calls for justice on Stanley acquittal anniversary

Quote:

Two years to the day that Gerald Stanley was acquitted of the murder of Colten Boushie, the family of the dead Indigenous man are again calling for reforms to the Canadian justice system.
“The colonial courts were created without Indigenous input and continue to oppress Indigenous people,” said Jade Tootoosis, Boushie’s cousin.
“We want to be heard but most of all, we should be included.”
Tootoosis, Boushie’s mother Debbie Baptiste and the family lawyer Eleanore Sunchild hosted a screening of "nipawistamasowin: We Will Stand Up," a documentary that portrays the events of the night of Aug. 9, 2016, when Boushie, a Cree man from Red Pheasant First Nation, and four other people entered onto Stanley’s property.
Stanley shot Boushie in the head and killed him. The film then follows the second-degree murder trial of the Saskatchewan farmer, a white man, and his acquittal by a jury that did not include any Indigenous people.
The film won awards from prominent film festivals in North America and has already been shown across the country.
Baptiste has seen it several times and spoken publicly about Boushie’s death in the past. She says it never gets easier.
“For me, it’s not a healing process,” she told Global News ahead of the screening in North Battleford.
“It’s opening my wounds over and over again. But then I go through it because I have to. We have to get the word out there.”
Baptiste said she’s been angry and in pain since Boushie died, and that those emotions were especially powerful on the anniversary of the acquittal.
Boushie’s death and Stanley’s trial garnered national headlines and prompted debate about reforms to the Canadian legal system.
The effect that peremptory challenges -- the ability for lawyers to dismiss potential jurors without providing a reason -- can have on the ethnic makeup of a jury prominently featured in articles and debates.
The federal government introduced legislation to ban the challenges but an Ontario judge has since struck down the ban and similar decisions in other provinces are expected.
Sunchild said the injustice wasn’t limited to jury selection and included how the family was told about Boushie’s death, among other things.
She said a jury with several Indigenous members may have produced a different verdict or would have appeared to have no bias. But she also said focusing on just a single aspect of the case misses the bigger picture.
“You start with looking at Colten as a human being. You start by recognizing the fact that Indigenous people need justice too,” she told Global News.
She said the film provided an insight into how the family was treated.
All three people said a royal commission or a United Nations investigation into how the justice system treats Indigenous people is needed. All said the matter is an issue of reconciliation.
Baptiste said she’ll keep working towards making reforms to the justice system and that she won’t be discouraged by the lack of progress she’s experienced so far.
“We’re all human beings and something will change. That’s the hope we got,” she said.

I have 2 thoughts here

1) How come they have no outrage over the 100's of indigenous persons selected for jury duty that didn't show up?
2) How much did Trudeau pay them with his tear filled apology and change to the system that is now seeing many retrials of convicted fellons
 
petros
+1
#638
A circle would have came to the same not guilty verdict.
 
Girth
+5
#639
No wonder Bousie was a criminal. His family are in denial, and playing the race card to make excuses for their son's poor behavior.
 
petros
+3
#640
Thug life.
 
captain morgan
+6
#641
How sad that these 'family members' aren't capable of understanding personal responsibility
 
Mowich
+5
#642
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

No wonder Bousie was a criminal.

Aided and abetted by the kid's grandmother who was present but hardly accountable when the group began drinking whiskey at her house........then the same unaccountable grandmother let them go for a drunken joy ride.

Where were all these caring people before the incident happened. Colten came from a family rife with criminals as numerous police reports have detailed over the years. By turning a blind eye to the fact that Colten had been in trouble before and was desperately in need of someone to show him the error of his ways, the community which includes Tootoosis bears at least partial responsibility for his ill-fated journey down that dirt road. It is all well and good to for them to blame Canadians and Canadian governments but in doing so it would behoove them to acknowledge their role in this tragedy.
 
Twin_Moose
+2
#643
But, but he was a good boy, never in trouble, chopped wood for the elders, helped everyone in the community, everybody that new him loved him. /smh
 
Girth
+1
#644
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Aided and abetted by the kid's grandmother who was present but hardly accountable when the group began drinking whiskey at her house........then the same unaccountable grandmother let them go for a drunken joy ride.

It's all the White Man's fault. Don't you understand that we committed cultural genocide against them.
 
Mowich
+1
#645
Legal reforms after Gerald Stanley case causing confusion

Vague wording in a bill, which made significant changes to Canada’s legal system after the acquittal of Gerald Stanley, has resulted in confusion in courtrooms across the country.

A recent Ontario court ruling could result in dozens of serious criminal cases needing re-trials and a legal expert says it’s not clear how the new law will be consistently applied in Saskatchewan just yet.

“The indecision came about,” said Bill Roe, who practiced criminal law for almost 40 years, “because… parliament did not make it clear whether or not this would apply to pending charges.”

On Sept. 19, 2019, Bill C-75 received royal assent. The legislation banned peremptory challenges — the ability of lawyers to veto potential jurors without providing a reason.

A decision made in January by the Ontario Court of Appeal determined that the abolishment of peremptory rights should not apply to cases where charges were already laid before the bill became law — meaning that the challenges can’t be used in Ontario for cases with charges laid after Sept. 20.

Roe, a sessional lecturer at the University of Saskatchewan College of Law, said only one case has dealt with the issue in Saskatchewan and that the case isn’t binding upon other judges.

“Brother [and sister] judges could disagree with the judge, with Justice Danyliuk’s decision. They could reach their own conclusion and run a jury trial without peremptory challenges,” he said, referring to the R v Dorian case, which took place in October 2019.

Justice R.W. Danyliuk ruled, according to court documents, that peremptory challenges could be used in that jury trial because the charges in Bill C-75 were not retrospectively applicable.

Roe said other judges could look to Danyliuk’s decision but were not restricted by it, meaning they, in theory, could rule that peremptory challenges should not be used in jury selections for ongoing cases for which the charges were laid before Sept. 19.

Saskatchewan is among several provinces tackling the issue. Roe said that different rulings in different provinces likely mean the issue will require the Supreme Court of Canada to make the ultimate determination.

The bill places responsibility for jury selection with the presiding judge, who will ask questions from the respective counsels but leaving inclusion or dismissal up to their discretion.

A Saskatchewan law court spokesperson said she couldn’t “pull together” a number of how many cases were ongoing on Sept. 19, 2019, which could end up as jury trials, given that it would include new arrests from that day and ongoing cases.

A spokesperson for Saskatchewan Justice Minister Don Morgan said the minister was unable to comment on “how a hypothetical case may affect future legislation or justice system processes.”

Peremptory challenges received national attention during the trial of Gerald Stanley, a white man who was acquitted on Feb. 9, 2018, of the killing of Colten Boushie, an Indigenous man, by a jury in Battleford, Sask., with no visibly Indigenous members. Boushie’s family, at the time, said the vetoes were used to ensure that was the case.

Roe said he didn’t know if the new legislation will make jurors and jury selection less prone to biases and that Canadians would have to “wait and see” if the removal of the challenges was a good idea.

“What we want for the accused is a fair trial, that’s, that’s the cornerstone of the Canadian… system of justice.”

www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/legal-reforms-after-gerald-stanley-case-causing-confusion
 

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