A Conservative Worth Listening To?


DichotoMe
Free Thinker
#1
George Osbourne is no angel, but at least he has vision! If Canadian Conservatives had plans like these, instead of the Cap & Trade program or aviation investment, I might actually vote for them. Imagine, a Pan Canadian HSGT (High Speed Ground Transport) that is fast, comfortable and better for the environment. Plus the Maglev System is a great way to spend a few billion dollars in a recession.

My question is "Are there any members of the CPC that could/would step up and stand behind these ideas?"

Link:
FT.com / UK - Japan inspires Tories' land of rising green tax

Article (just in case):

Japan inspires Tories' land of rising green tax
By James Blitz, Political Editor
Published: August 31 2006 03:00 | Last updated: August 31 2006 03:00

George Osborne [English MP] is in Japan today. The shadow chancellor acknowledges that some might find this a strange choice for a high-profile visit at the start of the new political season. In the age of globalisation, so much of the focus is on the growth of China and India that Japan has been somewhat neg-lected by British politicians.

But Mr Osborne believes the world's second largest economy still has much to teach Britain. "Japan has maintained its manufacturing strength and has a trade surplus with China when our own trade deficit with China is actually growing," he told the FT.

Mr Osborne also argues that Japan has much to teach the UK about the need to develop skills. "An educated workforce is essential to competitiveness and Britain still does not have the skilled workforce it needs."

But it is Japan's environmental policy record that has really aroused his interest, and why Tokyo is the place where he today sets out a new pledge by the Conservatives to increase the taxation of environmentally damaging behaviour.

Mr Osborne insists this policy should not be of concern to British business. "Japanese companies are showing the world how new technologies can not only improve our quality of life but improve the environment and economic efficiency too," he says.

He cites several facts to back his case. Japan, he says, emits 90 tonnes of carbon per million dollars of gross domestic product, compared with 125 tonnes in the UK. In 2004, Fujitsu, the computer giant, reduced its consumption of electricity by 25 per cent.

Above all, he says, the development of Japan's MagLev ultra-fast railway system, is "a clear example of improving the economy and improving environmental standards at the same time".

"I want us to look seriously at how an ultra-fast rail system could be introduced in Britain," he says.

To many, the thought of Britain enjoying 600 kph train travel will seem the stuff of dreams. However, Mr Osborne's commitment to raise green taxes is more concrete and immediate.

Since he became shadow chancellor, hard pledges on economic policy from him and David Cameron have been rare. "But I am now saying that there will be a shift in burden of taxation away from 'good' things like investment savings and income towards 'bad' things like pollution."

Steve Norris, the former minister who heads the Tories' environment task force, has been vociferous in talking about this kind of approach. Mr Norris has said the Tories need to look at taxing short-haul air travel and car use. Mr Osborne says he is pleased Mr Norris is thinking hard about these issues but is careful not to rule anything in or out.

"We are still two or three years from a general election. As we come closer to the election, and as we see what state public finances are in, we can be more specific," he says. His caution does not come only from fears about second-guessing the state of the economy a few years from now. Green taxation is a politically treacherous area. Take a tax on aviation. The Conservatives might want to get more people travelling by Euro-star to Europe but they do not want to stop the family in Liverpool being priced out of their holiday to Spain.

"A tax will only work if it is significant - and if it is so significant that it makes the cheap family holiday unaffordable it may be a political liability," says one senior Tory. "But you could tax people at certain times of day or only on domestic flights."

All told, Mr Osborne starts the new political season in an upbeat mood. "At no point in my adult life has it been more exciting to be a Conservative. We are making the political weather and setting the terms of the political debate.

"It was because David Cameron took the decision to make environmental policy a priority that all the other parties are now playing political catch-up."

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2008
 
Dexter Sinister
No Party Affiliation
#2
The last Conservatives worth listening to as far as I can tell were people like Joe Clark and Dalton Camp and Robert Stanfield (and emphatically NOT Bryan Mulroney). They were REAL Conservatives. There are no real Conservatives in the CPC, though I think a few of them may yet show some sense and merit once Steve the control freak Harper is gone. But until then it's just the cranky old Reform Party with a different name.
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
#3
I guess if you consider Red Tories like Clark and Camp "real conservatives" you may have a point however, only somebody on the far left could consider these boys conservatives.
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

I guess if you consider Red Tories like Clark and Camp "real conservatives" you may have a point however, only somebody on the far left could consider these boys conservatives.

Yeah, things change in weird aspects. The old Liberal-Conservative of MacDonald's day has very little in common with the neo-Conservative. Much like the American liberal of B. Franklin's, J.Adams, etc. day has little to do with the liberal of today's American.
Couple items I found interesting to a point:


History of the Conservative Party of Canada - Canadian History

Conservative Party of Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
DichotoMe
Free Thinker
#5
I'm not really trying to identify which conservatives are "REAL" conservatives. That is an argument I'm not sure anybody can win.

I'm interested in identifying a conservative MP that has exemplified an ability to embrace valid science/new technology and apply it to industrial, environmental and residential development. Someone with a sustainable plan and vision who can stand behind a course of action such as the one in the article.

Schwarzenegger has even used the environment as a major platform issue. There has to be one Canadian conservative MP that is willing, at the very least, to use it as an election ploy.
 
Tyr
Free Thinker
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Dexter Sinister View Post

The last Conservatives worth listening to as far as I can tell were people like Joe Clark and Dalton Camp and Robert Stanfield (and emphatically NOT Bryan Mulroney). They were REAL Conservatives. There are no real Conservatives in the CPC, though I think a few of them may yet show some sense and merit once Steve the control freak Harper is gone. But until then it's just the cranky old Reform Party with a different name.

That's Canadian politics. At a time when the "new " conservatives (federal) act like "Big gov't" liberals and The Liberals (BC) act like "true" Conservatives. It's difficult to hang a name on any of the political parties that truly fits their political philosophy.

I would have a hard time calling the current "pack" conservatives. They are far right in the socially morality and left of centre in the fiscal responsiblity.

"Iggy" is closer to a "true" conservative than Harper, but that's immaterial when they all seem to "bend" to whatever particular wind is blowing and don't have a "cast-in-stone" political philosophy about anything concrete
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by DichotoMe View Post

I'm not really trying to identify which conservatives are "REAL" conservatives. That is an argument I'm not sure anybody can win.

I'm interested in identifying a conservative MP that has exemplified an ability to embrace valid science/new technology and apply it to industrial, environmental and residential development. Someone with a sustainable plan and vision who can stand behind a course of action such as the one in the article.

Schwarzenegger has even used the environment as a major platform issue. There has to be one Canadian conservative MP that is willing, at the very least, to use it as an election ploy.

The Green's maybe?
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Tyr View Post

That's Canadian politics. At a time when the "new " conservatives (federal) act like "Big gov't" liberals and The Liberals (BC) act like "true" Conservatives. It's difficult to hang a name on any of the political parties that truly fits their political philosophy.

I would have a hard time calling the current "pack" conservatives. They are far right in the socially morality and left of centre in the fiscal responsiblity.

"Iggy" is closer to a "true" conservative than Harper, but that's immaterial when they all seem to "bend" to whatever particular wind is blowing and don't have a "cast-in-stone" political philosophy about anything concrete

That, too.
 

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