Netflix: Making a Murderer

Retired_Can_Soldier
+2
#1  Top Rated Post
I just finished watching the Nine Part documentary that follows the wrongful conviction of Steven Avery who served 18 years for a rape he did not commit, only to be exonerated by DNA evidence. But that is really where the story begins, because Avery, in the midst of a multi-million dollar lawsuit against the County that wrongfully convicted him suddenly is charged with the murder of a 25 year old Wisconsin woman named: Teresa Halbach.

This documentary is not a reality show, but a 10-year look at one of the most fascinating bizarre cases I have ever heard about. At the time of his arrest, Avery was embroiled in a lawsuit that could have fetched him in excess of 30 million dollars. It is a commentary on lousy police investigative technique or lack thereof and it raises a credible question as to whether members of the Manitowoc County Police Department were embroiled in a conspiracy to bring Avery down.

There are issues in this documentary that will leave people asking whether or not Steven Avery is guilty of the crime for which he was found guilt. It will show you how Police Detectives coerced a 16 year old boy (Brendan Dassey) with learning disabilities into a confession by feeding him evidence that should have been withheld which leads to his conviction.

Riveting, is the best word I can use to describe this documentary. I highly recommend it.



(Above) Steven Avery after being arrested for a rape he would serve 18 years only to be exonerated by DNA evidence.



(Above) Avery arrested for the murder of Teresa Halbach only weeks before he was to hear of a lawsuit that would have awarded millions.



Murder victim Theresa Halbach led to the arrest of Avery after her bones were found in a fire pit outside his home along were her Toyota Rav 4 found on the families property



(Above) Brendan Dassey, also found guilty in the murder and rape of Teresa Halbach is the most shocking part of this documentary, simply because the (obviously slow) Dassey is coerced by police into a false confession, but clearly sold out by his own defense team who was working with the prosecution.

I strongly urge people top watch this. It was fascinating and even after it was over, I was left with a great many questions about the judicial system..
 
CDNBear
+1
#2
Watched. It's very slanted, but even with the evidence they excluded, the case was a mess. Guilty or not, I think it's fair to say he was railroaded.

There's a lot of banjo music emanating from that property. But that doesn't negate the fact that Scott Tadych and Charles Avery should have been considered suspects as well.

I have a lot of links if you'd like to to discuss it at any length Mark.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Watched. It's very slanted, but even with the evidence they excluded, the case was a mess. Guilty or not, I think it's fair to say he was railroaded.

There's a lot of banjo music emanating from that property. But that doesn't negate the fact that Scott Tadych and Charles Avery should have been considered suspects as well.

I have a lot of links if you'd like to to discuss it at any length Mark.

I did a lot of reading on it afterwards. Avery isn't as innocent as he seems, although he was definitely isn't guilty of the rape he served 17 years for and the police force definitely railroaded him. I think what I found most troubling was the nephew. I don't think that kid should be in jail.
 
CDNBear
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_Soldier View Post

I think what I found most troubling was the nephew. I don't think that kid should be in jail.

Everything I've read on Brendon, leaves me on the fence.

I'd like to see or hear all the interviews between him and Fassbender and Weigert. I'm not completely sold that he was fed details by the special investigators.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Everything I've read on Brendon, leaves me on the fence.

I'd like to see or hear all the interviews between him and Fassbender and Weigert. I'm not completely sold that he was fed details by the special investigators.

It certainly speaks to how bizarre people can be. Here Steven Avery is on the cusp of winning a multi-million dollar lawsuit and he kills someone. In my opinion, there is too much evidence pointing to his guilt, but I think what we have here is a case of the local police hedging their bets in getting a conviction. May adding a few pieces to the mix.

Nothing adds up with Brendon. In my opinion his confession to police was definitely coached and there really wasn't any evidence. No blood in the bedroom, where he claimed to have cut her throat. No semen where he said he had raped her. I think he may have been present during the burning, but I don't think he was involved the killing.

There is so much reasonable doubt surrounding the whole case it is a wonder either of them were convicted.
 
CDNBear
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_Soldier View Post

There is so much reasonable doubt surrounding the whole case it is a wonder either of them were convicted.

Can you imagine the repercussions from an aquittal based on Police misconduct/corruption?

The fallout would have seen the vacating of thousands of convictions.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Can you imagine the repercussions from an aquittal based on Police misconduct/corruption?

The fallout would have seen the vacating of thousands of convictions.

Look at the OJ trial which was fought on the notion that police planted evidence.

Money walks.
 
CDNBear
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_Soldier View Post

Look at the OJ trial which was fought on the notion that police planted evidence.

Money walks.

It does. But so does baffle gab. Which OJ's lawyers used in excess.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

It does. But so does baffle gab. Which OJ's lawyers used in excess.


That's the point. They were able to plant a seed of doubt based on nothing. While there was enough reasonable doubt in the Avery Trial to bring a not guilty conviction. That is not to say Avery was innocent either.
 
CDNBear
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_Soldier View Post

That's the point. They were able to plant a seed of doubt based on nothing. While there was enough reasonable doubt in the Avery Trial to bring a not guilty conviction. That is not to say Avery was innocent either.

Agreed.
 
spaminator
#11
Netflix documentary series 'Making a Murderer' filming new episodes
THE CANADIAN PRESS
First posted: Tuesday, July 19, 2016 04:45 PM EDT | Updated: Tuesday, July 19, 2016 04:52 PM EDT
"Making a Murderer" will be making a return to Netflix.
The streaming service announced Tuesday that the filmmakers behind the hit Emmy-nominated docu-series are producing new episodes.
The latest instalments promise to delve back into the stories of Steven Avery and his co-defendant Brendan Dassey as they seek to challenge their convictions in the 2005 death of photographer Teresa Halbach.
Helmed by directors Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos, the new episodes will look into the post-conviction process and emotional toll for all involved.
Avery's new lawyer Kathleen Zellner and Dassey's legal team, led by Laura Nirider and Steve Drizin, will be featured in the new episodes. Filmmakers will also offer a closer glimpse at the families and other individuals close to the case.
"Making a Murderer" has generated significant buzz since its release late last year, and recently received six Emmy nominations, including a nod for outstanding documentary or non-fiction series.
Netflix documentary series 'Making a Murderer' filming new episodes | TV | Enter
 
tay
+1
#12
A federal judge has ordered Brendan Dassey be grantedsupervised release from prison.

Federal Judge William Duffin, who previously overturned Dassey's conviction for the 2005 murder of Teresa Halbach, now says he should be released from prison while the state appeals the overturning.

The release from prison is not immediate, however, and comes with multiple conditions. Any violation would result in his being returned to custody.

Among the conditions:


'Making a Murderer' subject Dassey granted supervised release | WJAR
 
spaminator
spaminator
#14
No promises to Making a Murderer inmate: Lawyer
 
spaminator
#15
Judges: Making a Murderer confession was coerced
 
spaminator
#16
Judges appear split on whether 'Making a Murderer' subject Brendan Dassey's confession coerced
Todd Richmond and Michael Tarm, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
First posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 11:32 AM EDT | Updated: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 05:32 PM EDT
CHICAGO A federal appellate judge hearing arguments Tuesday in Chicago about whether investigators coerced a confession from a Wisconsin inmate featured in the Making a Murderer series said video of detectives questioning Brendan Dassey was so disturbing that it made her skin crawl.
But other judges at the full-court rehearing at 7th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in Chicago sounded unconvinced that investigators had improperly manipulated the intellectually challenged Dassey and encouraged him to tell them not what he actually did but what they wanted to hear.
If the court decides the confession was forced, Dassey could go free in a high-profile case that puts police interrogation practices in the spotlight. The seven judges who heard the arguments seemed split, based on their questions. A ruling is expected within the next few months.
Dassey, now 27, was sentenced to life in prison in 2007 in the death of photographer Teresa Halbach two years earlier. He was 16 when he told detectives he helped his uncle, Steven Avery, rape and kill Halbach in the Avery familys junkyard in Manitowoc County.
A federal magistrate judge overturned Dasseys conviction last year, ruling that detectives took advantage of Dasseys youth and cognitive disabilities to coerce his confession. A three-judge panel from the appellate court later upheld the magistrates ruling, leading state attorneys to ask the full 7th Circuit for a review.
It was Chief Judge Diane Wood who most clearly signalled that she believed the detectives went too far, including by quoting a Biblical passage that the truth would set him free to suggest Dassey might be released if he confessed and by winning his trust by saying they were talking to him more as parental figures than as cops.
The investigators made my skin crawl watching this video, Wood said. It was: Tell me (the investigator) what I want to hear. Wood noted that Dassey appeared disoriented, pausing for long stretches in the video. He is obviously racking his brain about how he can answer ... in a way (investigators) will like, she said.
Dasseys has a low IQ and struggles to grasp simple concepts, meanings and consequences, court filings say. Wood said comments by Dassey during his interview strongly suggested he didnt understand what was happening. After appearing to confess to participation in a brutal slaying, she noted, he asked the detective if he could now go back to school.
Luke Berg, representing the state, argued that detectives had merely nudged a confession out of Dassey and that it wasnt psychological manipulation that led Dassey to say what he did. Brendan Dassey confessed, Berg said, because his guilt became unbearable.
And Judge Diane Sykes told Dasseys attorney, Laura Nirinder, there were no laws that explicitly barred her clients interrogators from using the techniques they did.
Dassey has remained in prison while the state appeals.
Avery was sentenced to life in prison at a separate trial. Hes pursuing his own appeal in state court.
Both Avery and Dassey contend police framed them because they wanted revenge against Avery for filing a lawsuit against Manitowoc County over his wrongful imprisonment for a sexual assault he didnt commit. Their cases gained attention in 2015 after Netflix aired Making a Murderer, a series examining Halbachs death that spawned widespread conjecture about Avery and Dasseys innocence.
Authorities who worked on the cases said the series was biased.
Judges appear split on whether 'Making a Murderer' subject Brendan Dassey's conf
 
spaminator
#17
Making a Murderer's' Brendan Dassey asks Supreme Court to review confession
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
February 20, 2018
Updated:
February 20, 2018 6:31 PM EST
In this April 16, 2007, file photo, Brendan Dassey appears in court at the Manitowoc County Courthouse in Manitowoc, Wis. (Dan Powers/The Post-Crescent, Pool, File)
MILWAUKEE Lawyers for a Wisconsin inmate featured in the Making a Murderer series on Netflix asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday to review a federal appeals court decision that held his confession was voluntary.
Brendan Dasseys legal team told the high court in their petition that the case raises crucial issues that extend far beyond Dasseys case alone and that long have divided state and federal courts.
Dasseys lawyers claim investigators took advantage of his youth and intellectual and social disabilities to coerce him into falsely confessing that he helped his uncle, Steven Avery, rape and kill photographer Teresa Halbach in 2005 in the Avery familys junk yard in Manitowoc County. Dassey was 16 at the time. He was sentenced to life in prison in 2007.
Too many courts around the country, for many years, have been misapplying or even ignoring the Supreme Courts instructions that confessions from mentally impaired kids like Brendan Dassey must be examined with the greatest care and that interrogation tactics which may not be coercive when applied to an adult can overwhelm children and the mentally impaired, his attorney, Steven Drizin, said in a statement.
A federal court in Wisconsin overturned Dasseys conviction in 2016, and a three-judge panel of the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed that decision last June. While the full 7th Circuit voted 4-3 to reverse the panels decision to grant him a new trial, one dissenting judge called the case a profound miscarriage of justice.
The legal odds remain high against Dassey. The U.S. Supreme Court grants only a tiny fraction of the petitions for review that it receives.
Avery, who insists police framed him, is appealing his conviction in Wisconsin state courts.
http://torontosun.com/news/crime/mak...iew-confession
 
spaminator
#18
Teen in Netflixs
 
Hoid
#19
Gord Downey summed it up perfectly:nobody cares about a crime that you didn't do.

Police have always railroaded people - check out Chris McCullough from Hamilton. Never been a book or song or movie about him because he was just a poor kid from Hamilton who was in the wrong place and got to spend many years behind bars for a murder he could not have committed - because the police took the word of the actual murderer that Chris had done it.
 

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