How could we cope if capitalism failed?


Cliffy
#1
Ask 26 Greek factory workers

You could call the men and women at Viome factory workers, but that wouldn’t be the half of it. Try instead: some of the bravest people I’ve ever met. Or: organisers of one of the most startling social experiments in contemporary Europe. And: a daily lesson from Greece to Brexit Britain, both in how we work and how we do politics.

At the height of the Greek crash in 2011, staff at Viome clocked in to confront an existential quandary. The owners of their parent company had gone bust and abandoned the site, in the second city of Thessaloniki. From here, the script practically wrote itself: their plant, which manufactured chemicals for the construction industry, would be shut. There would be immediate layoffs, and dozens of families would be plunged into poverty. And seeing as Greece was in the midst of the greatest economic depression ever seen in the EU, the workers’ chances of getting another job were close to nil.
So they decided to occupy their own plant. Not only that, they turned it upside down. I spent a couple of days there a few weeks back, while reporting for Vice News Tonight on HBO, and it now looks like just an ordinary factory. Behind the facade, it has become the political equivalent of a Tardis: the more you look inside, the bigger the implications get.
For a start, no one is boss. There is no hierarchy, and everyone is on the same wage. Factories traditionally work according to a production-line model, where each person does one- or two-minute tasks all day, every day: you fit the screen, I fix the protector, she boxes up the iPhone. Here, everyone gathers at 7am for a mud-black Greek coffee and a chat about what needs to be done. Only then are the day’s tasks divvied up. And, yes, they each take turns to clean the toilets.


www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jul/18/cope-capitalism-failed-factory-workers-greek-workplace-control
 
petros
+2
#2
I have 500t of food. What do you have to trade?
 
Jinentonix
+2
#3
While I admire the workers gumption to keep working and "re-tool" the plant despite the original facility being shuttered, communism isn't really all that ground breaking of an idea
 
Cliffy
+1 / -1
#4
Funny how brainwashed some people are that they think worker owned businesses are communist. Capitalists are a funny lot: slaves defending their masters. Baaaaaah!!!
 
captain morgan
+3
#5  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Funny how brainwashed some people are that they think worker owned businesses are communist. Capitalists are a funny lot: slaves defending their masters. Baaaaaah!!!

The massive flaw in your, uh, logic (to use a word) is that the same workers that are operating the plant will have to rely on the same eeevvvviiilllll capitalist system to vend their chemicals in addition to purchase the raw materials.

... Funny how that works, eh?
 
petros
#6
 
Danbones
+1
#7
How can capitalism fail? It's never been tried.
 
White_Unifier
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Ask 26 Greek factory workers

You could call the men and women at Viome factory workers, but that wouldn’t be the half of it. Try instead: some of the bravest people I’ve ever met. Or: organisers of one of the most startling social experiments in contemporary Europe. And: a daily lesson from Greece to Brexit Britain, both in how we work and how we do politics.

At the height of the Greek crash in 2011, staff at Viome clocked in to confront an existential quandary. The owners of their parent company had gone bust and abandoned the site, in the second city of Thessaloniki. From here, the script practically wrote itself: their plant, which manufactured chemicals for the construction industry, would be shut. There would be immediate layoffs, and dozens of families would be plunged into poverty. And seeing as Greece was in the midst of the greatest economic depression ever seen in the EU, the workers’ chances of getting another job were close to nil.
So they decided to occupy their own plant. Not only that, they turned it upside down. I spent a couple of days there a few weeks back, while reporting for Vice News Tonight on HBO, and it now looks like just an ordinary factory. Behind the facade, it has become the political equivalent of a Tardis: the more you look inside, the bigger the implications get.
For a start, no one is boss. There is no hierarchy, and everyone is on the same wage. Factories traditionally work according to a production-line model, where each person does one- or two-minute tasks all day, every day: you fit the screen, I fix the protector, she boxes up the iPhone. Here, everyone gathers at 7am for a mud-black Greek coffee and a chat about what needs to be done. Only then are the day’s tasks divvied up. And, yes, they each take turns to clean the toilets.


www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jul/18/cope-capitalism-failed-factory-workers-greek-workplace-control

And I take it that they sell the products to people and make a profit from that. Sounds like a form of capitalism to me. I congratulate them on their success.

Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

How can capitalism fail? It's never been tried.

Extreme capitalism would fail. It would be called anarchy. However, a moderately capitalistic economic system works quite well.
Last edited by White_Unifier; Jul 18th, 2017 at 05:52 PM..
 
Danbones
#9
Trouble is a "COMPETITION IS A SIN" capitalism is what we have got.
 
Jinentonix
+2
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Funny how brainwashed some people are that they think worker owned businesses are communist. Capitalists are a funny lot: slaves defending their masters. Baaaaaah!!!

Yeah, that's right. Despite the fact I owned my own air services company, I'm a slave to my capitalist masters. You're an idiot. Let's look at some of the things you obviously overlooked or aren't bright enough to comprehend. First off there's no "boss". Clue number 1 that it's communism. Equal division of labour. Clue number 2 that it's communism. Clue number 3 requires a little knowledge of history, and that is the fact that Greeks have been flirting with communism since before WW2.

What's interesting is your reaction to my comment. The way you lashed out when you were informed that this great social experiment is nothing more than communism.
However, if that offends you think about this. Those workers are actually squatters. They took over a building (and the property it's on) they do not own.
One again, I admire their gumption to keep working despite the plant closure, but it's hardly a daring social experiment. There are communes all over the world.
 
Cliffy
-1
#11
 
Bar Sinister
#12
Probably the same way we are coping now.
 
Cliffy
-1
#13
[youtube]o_Ou1A9F9y4[/youtube]

You Can't Have Infinite Growth On A Finite Planet
 
Angstrom
+1
#14
Good restructuring of a business environment. Anything is possible if you have enough people working their butts off to make it work.
 
taxslave
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Ask 26 Greek factory workers

You could call the men and women at Viome factory workers, but that wouldn’t be the half of it. Try instead: some of the bravest people I’ve ever met. Or: organisers of one of the most startling social experiments in contemporary Europe. And: a daily lesson from Greece to Brexit Britain, both in how we work and how we do politics.

At the height of the Greek crash in 2011, staff at Viome clocked in to confront an existential quandary. The owners of their parent company had gone bust and abandoned the site, in the second city of Thessaloniki. From here, the script practically wrote itself: their plant, which manufactured chemicals for the construction industry, would be shut. There would be immediate layoffs, and dozens of families would be plunged into poverty. And seeing as Greece was in the midst of the greatest economic depression ever seen in the EU, the workers’ chances of getting another job were close to nil.
So they decided to occupy their own plant. Not only that, they turned it upside down. I spent a couple of days there a few weeks back, while reporting for Vice News Tonight on HBO, and it now looks like just an ordinary factory. Behind the facade, it has become the political equivalent of a Tardis: the more you look inside, the bigger the implications get.
For a start, no one is boss. There is no hierarchy, and everyone is on the same wage. Factories traditionally work according to a production-line model, where each person does one- or two-minute tasks all day, every day: you fit the screen, I fix the protector, she boxes up the iPhone. Here, everyone gathers at 7am for a mud-black Greek coffee and a chat about what needs to be done. Only then are the day’s tasks divvied up. And, yes, they each take turns to clean the toilets.


www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jul/18/cope-capitalism-failed-factory-workers-greek-workplace-control

There are many examples of this in BC. Richply and Nanaimo Forest Products come to mind. ANd Richply has been around for at least 30 years.
Funny thing though, when NFP was formed there was a need for 30 less employees to produce the same amount of pulp than when P&T owned it.

Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

[youtube]o_Ou1A9F9y4[/youtube]

You Can't Have Infinite Growth On A Finite Planet

SOC stop the breeding.
Last edited by taxslave; Aug 7th, 2017 at 10:56 AM..Reason: auto spell
 
Cliffy
#16
 
DaSleeper
#17
https://scontent-sea1-1.xx .fbcdn.net

 
darkbeaver
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

How can capitalism fail? It's never been tried.

It's labeled capitalism so they believe it is, it's really crime but they no longer know the difference.