Molds for 3d panels made from plaster production. Is it profitable?


ClaireForMolds
#1
I'm thinking about launching 3D panels production business. It seems to me it's a very profitable one. The difference between cost of plaster and finished product is huge. Income level reaches 300-500%. I saw in internet Formako.net company, which has molds made from plastic and polyurethane. It would be interesting to contact with manufacturer. I want to try to order molds from Russia and set up my own production of panels. What do you think about that idea?
So here weíve got a bag of plaster which can be bought with 17-19$. Mixing plaster with water and spilling it on the molds, we will get a beautiful 3D wall panel. Depending on thickness, one bag of plaster produces 4-5 panels. Europe average cost of each is 27-29$. Summarizing all afore-named, for every 18$ spent on the material, total profit accounts for 100$. (400% profit, excluding stuff and rent investments)
At first itís possible to produce by my own hands. But I've got small work experience with plaster (made some figures). And also these panels are rather huge, that might cause shipment problems. how do you think, is it possible to send such panels to different cities?
Most likely I will have to get in contact with designers and share benefits, as they might recommend the goods. I would appreciate you to share your feelings about that. How many investments does it take?
 
Curious Cdn
#2
How about sculpting blank panels with a computer controlled CNC router? That way you can do a different patterns each time, perhaps continuous wall murals. It might even save some labour. You had better be good with something like Solid Works or Inventor, though.
 
MHz
+1
#3  Top Rated Post
3d printer and use that to create the mold. Mostly hollow makes the final product lighter and some long fibers would make it stronger as in a cast.
 
taxslave
#4
Make one mold with a 3d printer then vacuum form castings out of plastic. Cheap, light and durable.
 
Walter
#5
How about condoms?
 

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