Man finds two halves of the same 14th Century ring a year apart


Blackleaf
+1
#1  Top Rated Post
A metal detectorist has spoken of his shock after discovering two halves of the same valuable gold ring - a year apart.

Pensioner Paul Schorn, 69, discovered the first half of the broken 14th century ring in a field near Winchester in Hampshire in 2016.

He went back to the ancient site numerous times until he unearthed the second part just a few yards from the first find over a year later.


Stunned pensioner, 69, finds two halves of the same valuable 14th Century gold ring just a year apart

A British metal detector has found the second half of a broken 14th century ring
Paul Schorn, 69, found the first fragment of the nearly 700-year-old ring in 2016
The second half completes the ring which could be worth up to 12,000


By Joe Pinkstone For Mailonline
12 February 2018

A metal detectorist has spoken of his shock after discovering two halves of the same valuable gold ring - a year apart.

Pensioner Paul Schorn, 69, discovered the first half of the broken 14th century ring in a field near Winchester in Hampshire in 2016.

He went back to the ancient site numerous times until he unearthed the second part just a few yards from the first find over a year later.


Paul Schorn, 69, from Lee-on-Solent found the second fragment of the 600-year-old ring (pictured, bottom) in almost the exact same spot in a field. He found the first part (pictured, top) with the three petals in the same Winchester field in December 2016

Mr Schorn pieced the two together like a jigsaw to make the ring whole again.

Aptly, the medieval ring has a depiction of a forget-me-not flower engraved on the face.

Mr Schorn, from Lee-on-Solent, hopes to keep the ring and get it repaired. Once fixed, the find could be worth up to 12,000 ($16,600).

Under the Treasure Act 1996, it is up to a coroner to decide whether such finds are 'treasure' or 'finders keepers'.

If the coroner deems the find to be 'treasure', then it will have to be handed over to a museum and the finder will get a reward.

Having spoken to the finds liaison officer at his local council, the treasure hunter is confident he will be allowed to keep his prized discovery.

The retired Royal Navy master-at-arms is hoping to get the ring put back together properly later in the year.

'Ever since I discovered the first part of the ring I went back and kept going over and over the same field to see if I could find the rest of it.


Aptly, the medieval ring has a depiction of a forget-me-not flower engraved on the face. Mr Schorn, from Lee-on-Solent, hopes to keep the ring and get it repaired. Once fixed, the find could be worth up to 12,000 ($16,600)

'I was amazed when I saw the second half pointing up at me.

'I didn't even have to dig for it, it was just there. I put the two parts together and they fitted perfectly.

'If I am allowed to keep it I will look into having the ring properly restored and rerounded,' said Mr Schorn.

The amateur metal detector visited the field several times looking for the second part of the ring which he eventually found in the ground close to the first find, in Winchester.

Winchester was the capital city of England from England's creation in 927 when the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms unified up until the successful invasion of William the Conqueror in 1066, at which point the capital moved to London.

Although the city was no longer the head of the nation, it still played an important role in the country as a prominent city.

The city would have been home to several powerful and successful people of the time, one of which likely owned the ring.

Katie Hines, the finds liaison officer at Hampshire County Council, said: 'Although unusual to find different parts of a broken object over a period of time, it can happen.

'But there are also lots of finders who have discovered part of something and desperately look for the other part of it and never find it.

'It will probably be a couple of months before we know the conclusion of the case. I need to report it to the coroner as potential treasure and if it is, we will ask the local museums if they would like to acquire it.


Paul Schorn, originally from Lee-on-Solent on the English South coast, found the first half on the 14th Century ring in a Winchester field in December 2016. The retired Royal Navy master-at-arms is hoping to get the ring put back together properly later in the year


Katie Hines, the finds liaison officer at Hampshire County Council, said: 'Although unusual to find different parts of a broken object over a period of time, it can happen.' Shown here is the ring places back together

'If they do decide to acquire it, Paul and the landowner will be paid an ex gratia reward for the ring fragment.

'If a museum doesn't acquire it, it will be disclaimed by the coroner and returned to Paul and the landowner.

'The ring's historical value is great in enhancing our knowledge not only about the object but about where it was found too.'


The ring was found in a field in Winchester, the find is subject to the laws of Treasure Act 1996. This legislation states that it is up to a coroner to decide whether such finds are 'treasure' or 'finders keepers' and if they should be returned to the finder or given to a museum

WHAT WAS ENGLAND LIKE IN THE 14TH CENTURY?


Peasants' Revolt, 1381

Child mortality was high, up to a third of all children did not survive past the age of five due to illness, disease and poor medical knowledge.

Up to 20 per cent of women would die during child birth or because of post-birth infections.

If a person survived a risky childhood and lived in a time without war, the average life expectancy peaked at around 40-45 years of age.

The House of Plantagenet were the royals that oversaw the entire century, from Edward I through to the deposition of Richard II by his cousin Henry IV in 1399.

In the middle of the century, a four year span between 1347 to 1351 saw one of the worst pandemics of all time - The Black Death.

It killed an estimated 200 million people - between 30 and 60 per cent of the total European population.

The Oriental rat flea was infected with the Yersinia pestis bacterium which spread the plague through the dirty streets and villages that were so popular during this era as hygiene and germs were not understood.

As well as one of the worst cases of diseases in human history which killed millions of people, scores of people perished due to a lack of food thanks to the Great Famine which spanned from 1315 to 1317.

Poor weather conditions saw a terrible yield of grains and caused a Europe-wide food shortage.

Starvation accounted for millions of death and a rise in crime, cannibalism and infanticide during this time.

If childbirth, diseases, plague or starvation didn't cause a premature death many people met their end in a more violent manner as conflicts were commonplace.

The Hundred Years War (which lasted 116 years from 1337 to 1453) was a series of conflicts waged between the kingdoms of England and France over the 'rightful' succession to the French throne.

In 1381, the working-class people snapped back at the affluent rulers in the 'Great Rising' or the 'Peasants Revolt' in which 1,500 rebels died in protest against poor living conditions and increasing taxes.

Read more: Stunned pensioner finds second half of valuable ring | Daily Mail Online
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Last edited by Blackleaf; Feb 21st, 2018 at 07:12 AM..
 
Curious Cdn
#2
No provenance and it's broken.

200 at auction.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

No provenance and it's broken.

200 at auction.

Not according to the article.
 
Curious Cdn
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Not according to the article.

Don't you ever watch Antiques Road Show?
 
Blackleaf
+1
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Don't you ever watch Antiques Road Show?

If you were to take a medieval gold ring onto Antiques Road Show it'll be valued at thousands of pounds, broken or otherwise.
 
Curious Cdn
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

If you were to take a medieval gold ring onto Antiques Road Show it'll be valued at thousands of pounds, broken or otherwise.

Actually, someone did bring in a manky old ring to the UK Roadshow that didn't look like anything special, that they'd found in the garden and asked "Is this Victorian, or what?" It turned out to be Roman.
 
Blackleaf
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Actually, someone did bring in a manky old ring to the UK Roadshow that didn't look like anything special, that they'd found in the garden and asked "Is this Victorian, or what?" It turned out to be Roman.

Well that often happens, where someone's got an old ring or jug or necklace that they didn't think was worth much and that's been kept in a cupboard in their house for the last 50 years getting dusty and then they find the Antiques Roadshow is in town so they decide to take it the show and find out it's worth 20,000.

The most expensive item ever taken onto the Antiques Roadshow was the FA Cup trophy of 1911-91 in a March 2016 episode - it was valued at more than 1m.




The trophy was first presented at the 1911 FA Cup Final replay between Bradford City and Newcastle United at Old Trafford which Bradford City won 1-0 after the first match finished 0-0


It was last presented at the 1991 FA Cup Final between Nottingham Forest and Tottenham Hotspur at Wembley, which Tottenham Hotspur won 2-1
 
Curious Cdn
#8
Is there anyone still alive, there who played on a winning World Cup team?
 
Blackleaf
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Is there anyone still alive, there who played on a winning World Cup team?

Geoff Hurst (the only man to have ever scored a hat-trick in a World Cup Final), Bobby Charlton, Jack Charlton, Gordon Banks (best goalkeeper in the world), George Cohen (whose nephew Ben Cohen won the 2003 Rugby World Cup with England), Ray Wilson, Nobby Stiles, Martin Peters, Roger Hunt, Jimmy Greaves, Peter Bonetti, Ron Flowers, Norman Hunter, Terry Paine, Ian Callaghan and George Eastham are the 16 surviving members of the 22-strong England squad which won the 1966 World Cup.

Last edited by Blackleaf; Feb 21st, 2018 at 09:27 AM..
 
DaSleeper
#10