All your gold are belong to us


Locutus
#1
Judge Says 10 Rare Gold Coins Worth $80 Million Belong to Uncle Sam



A judge ruled that 10 rare gold coins worth $80 million belonged to the U.S. government, not a family that had sued the U.S. Treasury, saying it had illegally seized them.

The 1933 Saint-Gaudens double eagle coin was originally valued at $20, but one owned by King Farouk of Egypt sold for as much as $7.5 million at a Sotheby's auction in 2002, according to Courthouse News.

After the U.S. abandoned the gold standard, most of the 445,500 double eagles that the Philadelphia Mint had struck were melted into gold bars.

However, a Philadelphia Mint cashier had managed to give or sell some of them to a local coin dealer, Israel Switt.

In 2003, Switt's family, his daughter, Joan Langbord, and two grandsons, drilled opened a safety deposit box that had belonged to him and found the 10 coins.



When the Langbords gave the coins to the Philadelphia Mint for authentication, the government seized them without compensating the family.



Jacqueline Romero, assistant U.S. attorney in Philadelphia, explained that the coins legally belonged to the government after Franklin Delano Roosevelt ordered citizens to exchange their gold for cash in an effort to keep the banks afloat during the Great Depression.


“Those coins were all in a vault and were supposed to be melted,” she asserted.


Newsy contributes, including an explanation of FDR’s policy:



more


Judge Says 10 Rare Gold Coins Worth $80 Million Belong to Uncle Sam - ABC News

Judge: Langboard Family’s $80 Million Double Eagle Gold Coins Belong to Government | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | Video | TheBlaze.com
 
Most helpful post: The members here have rated this post as best reply.
petros
+2
#2
What a scam.
 
CDNBear
+6
#3  Top Rated Post
Follows conventional logic.

If you buy stolen property from a pawn shop, the 'government' has every legal right to seize it, and return it to it's rightful owner.

For compensation, you sue the pawn shop that sold you the stolen property.

George McCann stole the coins in question, which were never released for circulation, from the mint, when he was a mint cashier.

As unfortunate as it is, it seems the courts rendered the correct verdict.
 
petros
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Follows conventional logic.

If you buy stolen property from a pawn shop, the 'government' has every legal right to seize it, and return it to it's rightful owner.

For compensation, you sue the pawn shop that sold you the stolen property.

George McCann stole the coins in question, which were never released for circulation, from the mint, when he was a mint cashier.

As unfortunate as it is, it seems the courts rendered the correct verdict.

They were stolen?
 
MapleDog
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Follows conventional logic.

If you buy stolen property from a pawn shop, the 'government' has every legal right to seize it, and return it to it's rightful owner.

For compensation, you sue the pawn shop that sold you the stolen property.

George McCann stole the coins in question, which were never released for circulation, from the mint, when he was a mint cashier.

As unfortunate as it is, it seems the courts rendered the correct verdict.

Funny,if your stuff is stolen and you find it in a pawn shop,the items won't be returned to you,they belong to the pawn shop,if you want them back you have to pay for it,but i guess if its items that allegedly belonged to the government or a bank etc,it is seized.
 
CDNBear
+2
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

They were stolen?

Yes. That's why I said it.

Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

Funny,if your stuff is stolen and you find it in a pawn shop,the items won't be returned to you,they belong to the pawn shop,if you want them back you have to pay for it,but i guess if its items that allegedly belonged to the government or a bank etc,it is seized.

Bullsh!t.
 
MapleDog
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Yes. That's why I said it.

Bullsh!t.

Not in quebec,here the original owners can't take his stuff back unless he pay the crooks owning the pawn shops.
i saw a few years ago a story about stolen stuff found in pawn shop,and one of them was a guitar belonging to a store that rented musical instruments,and the name of the store was stamped on the guitar,but apparently the store owner was told that if he wanted it back he had to pay for it "by the cops"
 
petros
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Yes. That's why I said it.

Quote:

But the criminal case was never prosecuted because the statute of limitations had run out by the time the Secret Service got involved, she says. The government did recover at least nine coins and melted them down.

Somebody owes the Mint $200.
 
CDNBear
+1
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

Not in quebec,here the original owners can't take his stuff back unless he pay the crooks owning the pawn shops.
i saw a few years ago a story about stolen stuff found in pawn shop,and one of them was a guitar belonging to a store that rented musical instruments,and the name of the store was stamped on the guitar,but apparently the store owner was told that if he wanted it back he had to pay for it "by the cops"

Bullsh!t.

Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Somebody owes the Mint $200.

And that has what to do with the fact that the verdict follows conventional logic, and is not a scam?
 
MapleDog
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Bullsh!t.

And that has what to do with the fact that the verdict follows conventional logic, and is not a scam?

I'm not bullsh*tting it was on J.E. a program like 20/20 or Dateline on TVA network.
 
CDNBear
+4
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

I'm not bullsh*tting it was on J.E. a program like 20/20 or Dateline on TVA network.

That's awesome.

I once saw that aliens helped build the pyramids on the history channel.

If you've filed a police report, and the property in question can be identified, the police can and will seize the property, fill out a receipt for the person/s they seized the property from, and either return the property immediately to the rightful owner, or hold it as evidence for the duration of the case.

If you doubt that in any way, call your local police detachment and ask.
 
SLM
+4
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

That's awesome.

I once saw that aliens helped build the pyramids on the history channel.

They do have a lot of nerve calling themselves The History Channel don't they?
 
CDNBear
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by SLM View Post

They do have a lot of nerve calling themselves The History Channel don't they?

"nerve" is putting it mildly.
 
TenPenny
#14
How did the cashier end up with them in the first place? That sounds a little fishy to me, he was supposed to be taking them in as part of his job and he/she managed to 'obtain' some. Assuming he paid out of his own pocket for them, he was still in the wrong.
 
CDNBear
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny View Post

How did the cashier end up with them in the first place? That sounds a little fishy to me, he was supposed to be taking them in as part of his job and he/she managed to 'obtain' some.

The 1933 Double Eagle, was never released into circulation.

Quote:

Assuming he paid out of his own pocket for them, he was still in the wrong.

George McCann was convicted of steal coins, in 1941.
 
MapleDog
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

That's awesome.

I once saw that aliens helped build the pyramids on the history channel.

If you've filed a police report, and the property in question can be identified, the police can and will seize the property, fill out a receipt for the person/s they seized the property from, and either return the property immediately to the rightful owner, or hold it as evidence for the duration of the case.

If you doubt that in any way, call your local police detachment and ask.

Its not like this in the great socialist province of quebec,any stolen items found in pawn shops,are not returned to the original owners,i do not know how it is for the other provinces,but quebec is not like the rest of Canada.
 
CDNBear
+1
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

Its not like this in the great socialist province of quebec,any stolen items found in pawn shops,are not returned to the original owners,i do not know how it is for the other provinces,but quebec is not like the rest of Canada.

Bullsh!t.
 
MapleDog
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Bullsh!t.

Think what you want,but it is how it is in quebec.
 
CDNBear
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

Think what you want,but it is how it is in quebec.

No it isn't, and I don't think that, I know it.
 
EagleSmack
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

Funny,if your stuff is stolen and you find it in a pawn shop,the items won't be returned to you,they belong to the pawn shop,if you want them back you have to pay for it

Incorrect.
 
TenPenny
+5
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

Not in quebec,here the original owners can't take his stuff back unless he pay the crooks owning the pawn shops.
i saw a few years ago a story about stolen stuff found in pawn shop,and one of them was a guitar belonging to a store that rented musical instruments,and the name of the store was stamped on the guitar,but apparently the store owner was told that if he wanted it back he had to pay for it "by the cops"

I saw a few years ago a story about a coyote chasing a roadrunner, the coyote fell off a cliff and a 5 ton weight landed on his head, he got up and ran away.
 
EagleSmack
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post


If you've filed a police report, and the property in question can be identified, the police can and will seize the property, fill out a receipt for the person/s they seized the property from, and either return the property immediately to the rightful owner, or hold it as evidence for the duration of the case.

If you doubt that in any way, call your local police detachment and ask.

The Bear is right. It is the Pawn Shop that is on the hook for buying stolen property when it is found to be in their posession.

Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny View Post

I saw a few years ago a story about a coyote chasing a roadrunner, the coyote fell off a cliff and a 5 ton weight landed on his head, he got up and ran away.

Oh that was great!
 
MapleDog
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

The Bear is right. It is the Pawn Shop that is on the hook for buying stolen property when it is found to be in their posession.



Oh that was great!

As i said,here in quebec,it is NOT like in the US,i don't know why but quebec laws are ****ed up.
 
taxslave
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

As i said,here in quebec,it is NOT like in the US,i don't know why but quebec laws are ****ed up.

No. You were fed a bunch of BS by someone that doesn't know what they were talking about. TV talk shows are not always a good source of information.
 
MapleDog
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

No. You were fed a bunch of BS by someone that doesn't know what they were talking about. TV talk shows are not always a good source of information.

Tell that to the store owner who found one of his instruments in a pawn shop.

BTW pawn shop here in quebec are owned by not so honest people.
 
taxslave
+2
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

Tell that to the store owner who found one of his instruments in a pawn shop.

BTW pawn shop here in quebec are owned by not so honest people.

Like pawn shops everywhere. I once found one of my powersaws in a pawn shop. The owner said I had to pay for it. I called him a thief and asked if he wanted to be charged with selling stolen property while there were several people in his store and walked out with the saw.

There would be more to it for a rental company to prove ownership because they also sell their stock so having their sticker on a guitar is not proof of ownership.
 
MapleDog
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Like pawn shops everywhere. I once found one of my powersaws in a pawn shop. The owner said I had to pay for it. I called him a thief and asked if he wanted to be charged with selling stolen property while there were several people in his store and walked out with the saw.

There would be more to it for a rental company to prove ownership because they also sell their stock so having their sticker on a guitar is not proof of ownership.

From what i heard when someone goes selling something in a pawn shop,apparently he has to show a proof of ownership,but i guess its a suggestion.

If someone were to do what you did here,he'd be arrested by the cops.
 
beaker
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

Tell that to the store owner who found one of his instruments in a pawn shop.

BTW pawn shop here in quebec are owned by not so honest people.

I do remember hearing that law in Quebec follows the Napoleanic Code rather than the British tradition, there are bound to be differences.
 
SLM
+2
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

From what i heard when someone goes selling something in a pawn shop,apparently he has to show a proof of ownership,but i guess its a suggestion.

If someone were to do what you did here,he'd be arrested by the cops.

As I understand it one does not sell things to a pawn shop; what pawn shops do is provide short term loans and take goods as collateral. Once the term of the loan is ended and the repayment of the loan is due, they shop can sell the items to recoup their money if the loan has not been repaid.

But stolen property is stolen property. The problem becomes proving that a specific item is stolen. Items that have a serial number of some kind are more easily identifiable, items without one are less identifiable. But if the police have the serial number for items listed in a police report they most certainly can seize the property from anyone. They have to, to my understanding. I don't know what program you were watching but I'd hazard to guess that the individual was not able to prove to a sufficient standard that the property belonged to him.

Quote: Originally Posted by beaker View Post

I do remember hearing that law in Quebec follows the Napoleanic Code rather than the British tradition, there are bound to be differences.

Stolen property would fall under criminal law though not civil law.
 
MapleDog
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by SLM View Post

As I understand it one does not sell things to a pawn shop; what pawn shops do is provide short term loans and take goods as collateral. Once the term of the loan is ended and the repayment of the loan is due, they shop can sell the items to recoup their money if the loan has not been repaid.

But stolen property is stolen property. The problem becomes proving that a specific item is stolen. Items that have a serial number of some kind are more easily identifiable, items without one are less identifiable. But if the police have the serial number for items listed in a police report they most certainly can seize the property from anyone. They have to, to my understanding. I don't know what program you were watching but I'd hazard to guess that the individual was not able to prove to a sufficient standard that the property belonged to him.



Stolen property would fall under criminal law though not civil law.

Many other found their stuff in pawn shops,and they had proof of ownership,store bills serial numbers etc,but they were all told,you want it back,PAY UP.
 

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