Trees uprooted and cars damaged as tornado rips through Manchester


Blackleaf
+1
#1  Top Rated Post
A miniature tornado has ripped through Greater Manchester, damaging buildings and smashing cars, and uprooting trees in its way.

The tornado hit areas around Manchester Airport to the south of the city centre at around 5pm on Friday.

Dan Teasdale took to Twitter to share footage of the swirling cloud over the Tatton Park Flower Show.

Tornado rips through Manchester: 'Five-minute torrent of madness tears up trees, rips roofs off buildings and smashes cars


A miniature tornado ripped through the Manchester area on Friday afternoon

Strong winds uprooted trees, smashed cars and tore roofs off buildings

Areas hit include Tatton Park Flower Show, Mobberley and Stamford Park in Hale


By Alisha Buaya For Mailonline
20 July 2019

A miniature tornado has ripped through Greater Manchester, damaging buildings and smashing cars, and uprooting trees in its way.

The tornado hit areas around Manchester Airport to the south of the city centre at around 5pm on Friday.

Dan Teasdale took to Twitter to share footage of the swirling cloud over the Tatton Park Flower Show.


A miniature tornado has ripped through Greater Manchester area on Friday, around 5pm. Video, captured by Dan Teasdale, shows swirling cloud over the Tatton Park Flower Show (pictured)

In Mobberley, Cheshire, Martin Kevill, 32, posted a video showing an uprooted tree after it hit the small village around 4.45pm.

'We were in the pub over the road and heard some pretty abnormal gusts. The pub rumbled and we ran outside to see what it was.

'The road was pitch black and it was really dark. When the gusts passed, a tree ripped up and fell over into a field of llamas.

'Then after a moment or two, the clouds moved along and it was actually quite clear again apart from the rain.

'I think a tree went over the train line a few metres away. The llamas are fine but there's a valley of horrific building damage through the area.'

Mr Kevill said there had been no warning about what was coming, but that the rain had been lashing down for about an hour before the tornado hit.


In Mobberley, Cheshire, Martin Kevill, 32, posted a video showing an uprooted tree after it hit the small village around 4.45pm. He said there had been no warning about what was coming, but that the rain had been lashing down for about an hour before the tornado hit



An officer surveys the extensive tree damage at Stamford Park, in Hale


The Met Office posted data from Manchester Airport, saying: 'Not very often an airport reports a funnel cloud by @manairport's earlier observation reported 'FC' with heavy showers.'

Met Office meteorologist Greg Dewhurst explained the ingredients needed for a tornado are unstable air through stormy conditions and 'wind shear' - air travelling in different directions and at different heights in the atmosphere.

'Those ingredients were there at the right time across the Manchester area this afternoon,' he said.

It is known as a funnel cloud until it touches the ground and causes damage. The UK normally sees between 30 and 50 a year.

Bruce Moran posted a picture of a car with a crumpled bumper and a sheet of metal lodged in someone's front garden.

He wrote: 'Yup. True Story. Tiles, roofs, trees ... smashed cars. Seemingly a five minute torrent of madness.'


Bruce Moran took to Twitter to share a picture of a car with a crumpled bumper and a sheet of metal lodged in someone's front garden in the aftermath of the tornado



A dark cloud can be seen forming over an open field. It is known as a funnel cloud until it touches the ground and causes damage


Rebecca Jeffery was in Stamford Park in Hale with her children, aged six and one, when the tornado hit. She photographed a flooded street and tree branches strewn on the ground

Rebecca Jeffery was in Stamford Park in Hale with her children, aged six and one, when the tornado hit.

Ms Jeffery said: 'The water running down the terraced roads was so deep I couldn't go through it and then suddenly there was a huge gust of wind.

'I turned the pram away from the wind and grabbed my six-year-old and then we stood as the wind went crazy and metal and wood swirled through the air above the houses.'

She continued: 'My son says I just shouted 'stay beside me' over and over again as I was panicking he'd get blown away.

'I've never seen trees move like that. I saw the tree branches fall down behind us and then suddenly it was all gone again. It was surreal.'

In 2005, one of the strongest tornadoes ever recorded in the UK hit Birmingham, carving a 7km path of destruction through the suburbs of the city.

It uprooted around 1,000 trees, lifted the roofs from buildings and overturned cars but miraculously no-one was killed.

Nineteen people were injured however, three of them seriously.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...hing-cars.html
 
B00Mer
#2
Your still here, guess that was an unsuccessful hit
 
Blackleaf
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Your still here, guess that was an unsuccessful hit

That's it, mate. I'm still here, talking my usual sense and saying it as it is.
 
Curious Cdn
#4
Did 17 6p worth of damage.
 
MHz
#5
You should be weatherproof after a century, was the post bragging about the lack of damage??
 
MHz
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Your still here, guess that was an unsuccessful hit

Hint, start with the Castles that don't need repairs. His posts will reflect how his day is going and that will tell you if you are getting warmer or cooler. Repeat as required.
 
Blackleaf
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Did 17 6p worth of damage.

Talking about 6p, many older folks in Britain fondly remember the sixpence - or tanner - coin.

"In my day, you were able to buy a pint of beer and buy the bus fare home for a tanner. Nowadays it'll cost you 5 for all that."

Thatcher abolished it in 1980, the year before I was born.

But even I am old old enough to remember when we still had the shilling. I still remember in about 1989 going into the Food and Tipple store, where my mum worked, with a handful of shillings to buy a Curly Wurly.

The shilling was then abolished on 31st December 1990. Now, rather boringly, we just have pounds and pence.
 
Curious Cdn
#8
A jolly, jolly sixpence?

It didn't last you all your life?
 
Blackleaf
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

A jolly, jolly sixpence?

It didn't last you all your life?

And there's Bottom in A Midsummer Night's Dream, where he ends up having to pay sixpence a day for life.

"I told him mine, which was down that street there, and which I wanted him to take to the Dover coach office for sixpence", then he replying: "Done with you for a tanner!" - David Copperfield (Charles Dickens, 1850)

Done away with by Thatcher in 1980.