Outrageous Canadian Political Facts


china
Conservative
#1
Outrageous Canadian Political Facts
In 1984, New Zealand voters booted a left-leaning conservative government and brought in a free-market-oriented labour government. Immediately, finance minister Sir Roger Douglas began to implement some of the most important reforms in any country of the 20th century. Sir Roger floated the currency, revoked all farm subsidies, abolished all import tariffs, and privatized 60% of state-owned companies. He also fired 55% of the government workforce and placed the central bank chairman on a performance contract, revoked capital gains and inheritance taxes, and refused to print money to save reckless banks and inefficient companies from bankruptcy.
The results have been simply astounding. New Zealand now has one of the lowest inflation rates in the world, nine consecutive years of budget surpluses, unemployment rates cut in half, and a resilient, entrepreneurial economy that soared 5.8% in 2002.
What are the lessons that we could take from this example and apply to BC, not to mention the rest of Canada? Hear intelligent Guest Speakers in person.


Find out about :

Taxes, Taxes, Taxes Liberal Red Book MP's Pension Plans The Senate Promises, Promises Greenpeace Investigates
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by china View Post

Outrageous Canadian Political Facts

In 1984, New Zealand voters booted a left-leaning conservative government and brought in a free-market-oriented labour government. Immediately, finance minister Sir Roger Douglas began to implement some of the most important reforms in any country of the 20th century. Sir Roger floated the currency, revoked all farm subsidies, abolished all import tariffs, and privatized 60% of state-owned companies. He also fired 55% of the government workforce and placed the central bank chairman on a performance contract, revoked capital gains and inheritance taxes, and refused to print money to save reckless banks and inefficient companies from bankruptcy.
The results have been simply astounding. New Zealand now has one of the lowest inflation rates in the world, nine consecutive years of budget surpluses, unemployment rates cut in half, and a resilient, entrepreneurial economy that soared 5.8% in 2002.
What are the lessons that we could take from this example and apply to BC, not to mention the rest of Canada? Hear intelligent Guest Speakers in person.



Find out about :

Taxes, Taxes, Taxes Liberal Red Book MP's Pension Plans The Senate Promises, Promises Greenpeace Investigates

The populace would have to be much leaner than what Canadians are before a leader could impose such tactics (I personally am all for them) without fear of being hanged. Intelligent people know you can't spend money you don't have.
 
Bar Sinister
No Party Affiliation
#3
I have no idea what this has to do with Canada, other than the fact that it is an example to be avoided. In point of fact many of the Changes forced on New Zealanders by the IMF had devastating effects on its social infrastructure; so much so that the government in question was crushed at the next election. Many of the so-called "reforms" were then rolled back.
 
china
Conservative
+1
#4  Top Rated Post
MP's Pension Plans

What A Friend They Have In Taxes!

The Top Ten

Upon retirement from office, assuming these MP's live only to 75 years, this is what they will receive.

1: Jean Charest, PC: $4,525,537.00

2: Brian Tobin, LIB: $3,907,507.00

3: David Dingwall, LIB: $3,660,930.00

4: Svend Robinson, NDP: $3,556,546.00

5: Bill Blaikie, NDP: $3,380,406.00

6: Sergio Marchi, LIB: $3,105,143.00

7: John Nunziata, LIB: $2,734,328.00

8: Sheila Copps, LIB: $2,551,223.00

9: Andre Ouellet, LIB: $2,636,953.00

10: Don Boudria, LIB: $2,152,672.00

Eighty-seven other MPs, including Bloc Quebecois leader Lucien Bouchard and NDP boss Audrey Mclaughlin, qualify for this gilded pension plan that could cost taxpayers in excess of $124,076,247.00

THE EXCEPTIONS: Ralph Klein, Premier of Alberta, has legislated that his cabinet must make arrangements for their own pensions, just like every Canadian citizen does. Pensions will no longer be funded by the taxpayers. He and his colleagues must purchase R.R.S.P.'s and worry about whether Paul Martin will be taxing pensions in future budgets.

Ralph Klein's government is unique in that he started budget cuts from the top, getting MLA's off the welfare rolls. He abolished his clothing and car allowance and took a personal salary cut of 5%. Pensions were abolished for everyone who became an MLA after 1989. Is there any reason why we can't expect our federal politicians to get off Canada's welfare system and start looking after themselves?

Mike Harris has done the same in Ontario. He has ended the tax-free allowance scheme, so that MP's get a flat salary just like regular working folk, cut their salaries, and scrapped the pension plan. Just like in Alberta, Ontario MP's have to make their own pension arrangements. In fact, Harris has gone a step further than anyone else, as he has also cut the NUMBER of MP's by more than two dozen! That alone is saving taxpayers millions of dollars a year.

WHAT YOU CAN DO: Write to your Premier, MP and Prime Minister asking if there is any reason why they cannot be responsible for their own pension plans like ordinary citizens have to. In a time when social programs are being targeted for spending cuts, then it is time that our elected Members of Parliament got off the welfare rolls.

For information on particular provincial and federal policies contact The Fraser Institute , an independent Canadian economic and social research and educational organization.
 
Bar Sinister
No Party Affiliation
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by china View Post

MP's Pension Plans

What A Friend They Have In Taxes!

The Top Ten

Upon retirement from office, assuming these MP's live only to 75 years, this is what they will receive.

1: Jean Charest, PC: $4,525,537.00

2: Brian Tobin, LIB: $3,907,507.00

3: David Dingwall, LIB: $3,660,930.00

4: Svend Robinson, NDP: $3,556,546.00

5: Bill Blaikie, NDP: $3,380,406.00

6: Sergio Marchi, LIB: $3,105,143.00

7: John Nunziata, LIB: $2,734,328.00

8: Sheila Copps, LIB: $2,551,223.00

9: Andre Ouellet, LIB: $2,636,953.00

10: Don Boudria, LIB: $2,152,672.00

Eighty-seven other MPs, including Bloc Quebecois leader Lucien Bouchard and NDP boss Audrey Mclaughlin, qualify for this gilded pension plan that could cost taxpayers in excess of $124,076,247.00

THE EXCEPTIONS: Ralph Klein, Premier of Alberta, has legislated that his cabinet must make arrangements for their own pensions, just like every Canadian citizen does. Pensions will no longer be funded by the taxpayers. He and his colleagues must purchase R.R.S.P.'s and worry about whether Paul Martin will be taxing pensions in future budgets.

Ralph Klein's government is unique in that he started budget cuts from the top, getting MLA's off the welfare rolls. He abolished his clothing and car allowance and took a personal salary cut of 5%. Pensions were abolished for everyone who became an MLA after 1989. Is there any reason why we can't expect our federal politicians to get off Canada's welfare system and start looking after themselves?

Mike Harris has done the same in Ontario. He has ended the tax-free allowance scheme, so that MP's get a flat salary just like regular working folk, cut their salaries, and scrapped the pension plan. Just like in Alberta, Ontario MP's have to make their own pension arrangements. In fact, Harris has gone a step further than anyone else, as he has also cut the NUMBER of MP's by more than two dozen! That alone is saving taxpayers millions of dollars a year.

WHAT YOU CAN DO: Write to your Premier, MP and Prime Minister asking if there is any reason why they cannot be responsible for their own pension plans like ordinary citizens have to. In a time when social programs are being targeted for spending cuts, then it is time that our elected Members of Parliament got off the welfare rolls.

For information on particular provincial and federal policies contact The Fraser Institute , an independent Canadian economic and social research and educational organization.


Why would anyone use the Fraser Institute as a source? It is a right wing "think tank" that is little better than a mouthpiece for the multinational corporations that finance it. As a result it tends to skew and distort information to support its right wing agenda.

As for Alberta and its nonexistent pension plan the reality is much worse than stated. Retiring Alberta MLAs get a payout when they retire amounting to three months' pay for every year they have been in office. Given the fact that most PC MLAs in Alberta are elected for life that gives them a huge payout. For example an MLA serving 15 years would receive a retirement bonus of about $350,000. Not bad considering what the average stiff gets when he finally retires.

Just for fun I did a rough calculation of Svend Robinson's pension. I gave him 15 years of service at an average salary of $150,000 (it was actually much lower than this) and used the parameters in the following article. Even using my exaggerated salary numbers his pension comes to about a third of the figure posted by China. I wonder how many of the other numbers are incorrect.

Here is the link if you want to do your own calculations. Pension Reform Must Start with MPs’ Plan
 
TenPenny
#6
Quote:

Ralph Klein, Premier of Alberta, has legislated that his cabinet must make arrangements for their own pensions, just like every Canadian citizen does



I assume that Ralph Klein, and possibly the author of the article, and quite possibly our friend China, might know that a huge number of Canadians DON'T arrange their own pensions, they're the delightful beneficiaries of pension plans paid for by the taxpayers of Canada, since they're civil servants with powerful unions. Another huge chunk of Canadians are beneficiaries of pensions paid for by their employers.

Sure, there are many, like myself, who have to save for our own retirement, but you have to admit that unionized civil servants have it pretty easy.

Since that part of the article is completely misguided, one can only assume the whole article is worthless as well.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny View Post

[/B]

I assume that Ralph Klein, and possibly the author of the article, and quite possibly our friend China, might know that a huge number of Canadians DON'T arrange their own pensions, they're the delightful beneficiaries of pension plans paid for by the taxpayers of Canada, since they're civil servants with powerful unions. Another huge chunk of Canadians are beneficiaries of pensions paid for by their employers.

Sure, there are many, like myself, who have to save for our own retirement, but you have to admit that unionized civil servants have it pretty easy.

Since that part of the article is completely misguided, one can only assume the whole article is worthless as well.

I think you make a good point- up to a point. Back in 1963 when I first started with the Public Service (and we had no union) our wages were behind that of the private sector, but one of the reasons we stuck with the job was because of the pension plan where the employer matched our contributions. For about 12 years I continued with pay less than the private sector, but the N.D.P. Gov't. of the day boosted our wage to be close to parity with the private sector. By this time we were unionized. The public sector has historically carried "dead weight" that no private outfit could afford to keep on a payroll, but that was a small minority. They by and large did jobs that someone had to do, albeit at an inflated wage for what they produced. I was content with that up until the union started listening to their whining and they went from merely being a burden to being a pain in the ass. To be fair there were many capable and efficient employees who more than earned their pay. What it boils down to is the old adage "the squeaky wheel gets the grease".
 
Bar Sinister
No Party Affiliation
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny View Post

[/B]

I assume that Ralph Klein, and possibly the author of the article, and quite possibly our friend China, might know that a huge number of Canadians DON'T arrange their own pensions, they're the delightful beneficiaries of pension plans paid for by the taxpayers of Canada, since they're civil servants with powerful unions. Another huge chunk of Canadians are beneficiaries of pensions paid for by their employers.

Sure, there are many, like myself, who have to save for our own retirement, but you have to admit that unionized civil servants have it pretty easy.

Since that part of the article is completely misguided, one can only assume the whole article is worthless as well.

I guess I am one of those who is the recipient of one of those great government pensions. Mind you I did make monthly contributions for 35 years into the pension plan. If I remember correctly the last year I contributed about $600 was being taken from my cheque each month.
 

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