On 145th birthday, Canadians want end to monarchy


dumpthemonarchy
#1
Totally agree. Good article about required constitutional reform so Canadians can have more democracy.



On 145th birthday, Canadians want end to monarchy



On 145th birthday, Canadians want end to monarchy

Duff Conacher, Special to the Daily News
Published: Saturday, June 30, 2012

Questions - most of them relating to the diversity of Canadians - still hang over Canada's Constitution even though 145 years have passed since it became the founding law of our country and governments,
This is not surprising, given that the Constitution was drafted by 36 men, 33 of them of British origin and three French, and that it was changed significantly by the British government before its parliament made it the law known as the British North America Act.
And at that time, these 36 men, all politicians, were elected by the votes of only white men who owned property or paid significant taxes or rent (men with low incomes, women and minorities were not allowed to vote).

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Only about 360,000 wealthy men voted back then, out of total population of about 3.3 million (half of whom were women) in the four provinces that then made up Canada (now known as Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick).

And while about two million of the people in those provinces were of British origin, and about one million of French origin, there were also about 200,000 people of German descent, 30,000 Dutch, 20,000 aboriginal peoples, and 20,000 black people.

Given their backgrounds, it is not surprising that the Constitution these 36 men drafted created a federal government and provincial governments modelled on the British Parliament, a constitutional monarchy. But even with all their similarities, it was far from sure that the four provinces would combine through the confederation process to form Canada.

In fact, in 1867 the Anti-Confederation Party in Nova Scotia won almost all the seats in the Canadian Parliament and the provincial legislature.

This new government voted to leave Canada but were prohibited from doing so by the British government.
The British Parliament continued to control Canada for decades more, passing 13 more British North America acts that changed our Constitution in many ways (including adding new provinces) from 1867 to 1951.
Canada's federal Parliament passed seven more similar laws from 1952 to 1981, and then, in 1982 along with the British Parliament, renamed all of these laws as part of Canada's Constitution, including the new Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the new Section 35 that recognized and affirmed the aboriginal treaty rights, new equality rights clause, and new process for amending the Constitution.

However, the 1982 renaming didn't change the constitutional structure of Canada's governments, nor did it resolve questions concerning Quebec's relationship with the federal government, especially given that Quebec's legislature did not ratify the 1982 changes.

And while some agreements have followed the 1987-1990 Meech Lake Accord, and 1992 Charlottetown Accord, both of which failed to make constitutional changes, federal-provincial relations overall are still dominated by debates over which government has the power to control various sectors of society.

As well, since 1982, new constitutional concerns and expectations have arisen, in part because of the growing diversity of Canadians (people of about 200 ethnic origins now live in Canada, including visible minorities making up 18% of the population), but also as a result of the abuse of powers by prime ministers and premiers.

Canadians have learned much in the past 30 years about how their governments actually work under Canada's Constitution, which sets out the powers of the governor general and provincial lieutenant governors (as representatives of the British monarchy) to check the decisions of the prime minister and premiers.

Unwritten constitutional rules and practices (known as "conventions") have developed over the past several decades to restrict these powers to the point that prime ministers and premiers can, essentially, appoint whomever they want to key positions (including law enforcement agencies), call elections and shut down Parliament or a provincial legislature whenever they want and control politicians in their party and force them to vote in favour of any laws they propose.

A recent survey conducted by Your Canada, Your Constitution found that 65% of Canadians want these powers set out in clear, written rules enforced by the Supreme Court of Canada (as politicians have done to varying degrees in Britain, Australia and New Zealand). Further, 52% of Canadians want Canada to become fully independent by retiring the British monarchy as the head of our governments.

So as we celebrate the national miracle that Canada, through its Constitution, became 145 years ago, it seems that a majority of Canadians also want to reflect on the more independent, democratic and inclusive country Canada
 
Walter
+2
#2
I like Betty.
 
Colpy
+5
#3  Top Rated Post


Forget it, Sonny
Support for the monarchy is actually RISING in English Canada.....and Quebec is becoming less and less relevant.
Add to that the fact that the necessary constitutional amendments would require unanimous consent of all the provinces.........and the removal becomes a practical impossibility.

You will live, and die, a subject of the monarchy. As will your children.

Deal with it.
Quote:

Those surveyed were asked whether they thought the monarchy is an important part of Canadian history and political culture that ought to be maintained or if it is a relic of our colonial past that has no place in the Canada of today.
Overall, the poll indicated some 51 per cent of Canucks want to maintain Canada’s links to the monarchy.
That is a six percentage point increase, up from 45 per cent of the population in support of keeping the Queen as head of state, when the survey’s results are compared to a similar poll conducted in 2009. The increase is mostly seen among those over the age of 35.
In Quebec, however, just 24 per cent of respondents say the monarchy is an important part of Canadian history, a figure that’s actually down six percentage points from the previous poll.
But the royals have increased in popularity in all other parts of the country, the poll indicates.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Eng...#ixzz20jUIYzlB
 
taxslave
+1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Colpy View Post



Forget it, Sonny
Support for the monarchy is actually RISING in English Canada.....and Quebec is becoming less and less relevant.
Add to that the fact that the necessary constitutional amendments would require unanimous consent of all the provinces.........and the removal becomes a practical impossibility.

You will live, and die, a subject of the monarchy. As will your children.

Deal with it.

Read more: English Canada increasingly desires to maintain ties with monarchy: Poll

Thats depressing as well as degrading.
 
Colpy
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Thats depressing as well as degrading.

How so??
 
WLDB
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Colpy View Post

How so??

I dont particularly care for the idea of being the subject of any monarch. I think we have bigger issues in the constitution to change though. I imagine the monarchy will eventually go but not for quite some time.
 
damngrumpy
#7
The fact is, in English Canada the support for the monarchy is rising and that
has been true for a few years now. I used to be a person who just wanted to
be rid of them. With the passage of time, translated, the older we get the more
we change our minds it seems.
I think there is nothing wrong with the monarchy.
 
taxslave
+2
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Colpy View Post

How so??

I find it embarrassing in this day and age to have a foreigner as head of our country even if it is basically a figure head.I also oppose hereditary leaders. But looking into the not very distant future do you really want to have to call Chuckie or Camilia "Majesty"?
 
s_lone
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpy View Post

The fact is, in English Canada the support for the monarchy is rising and that
has been true for a few years now. I used to be a person who just wanted to
be rid of them. With the passage of time, translated, the older we get the more
we change our minds it seems.
I think there is nothing wrong with the monarchy.

Would you agree to say that the older we get the more we become resistant to change in general?

What exactly changed in your way of seeing things? What caused you to want to get rid of monarchy and what changed your mind?
 
WLDB
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

But looking into the not very distant future do you really want to have to call Chuckie or Camilia "Majesty"?

Charles is the best asset the anti-monarchy camp has.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

But looking into the not very distant future do you really want to have to call Chuckie or Camilia "Majesty"?

Some people want to stop racing her.
 
The Old Medic
#12
It is neither degrading, nor should it be depressing. EVERY poll shows that Canadians do NOT want an end to the Monarchy. While a disgruntled minority do, the majority of the people do not.

She is the "Queen of Canada" as far as Canada is concerned. And frankly, Canada has ALWAYS existed under Monarchy, either that of France, or that of England.

In what way does having a monarch harm Canada? The country is totally free to make any laws that it chooses, it can amend, or change its Constitution at any time without consulting with any other country. In other words, it is a free agent, free to choose to either keep, or dismiss the Monarchy.

To date, the anti-monarchists are a small but noisy minority. I sincerely hope that they remain a tiny minority for a very long time. Personally, I like having my very distant cousin as the Queen. (She is my 17th, 19th, 22nd and 26th cousin, among several others. Her grandson William is my 13th Cousin [and a bunch of other levels of cousinship] through his mothers side. Hardly close enough to be invited to anything, but still, they are distant relatives.)
 
talloola
#13
I am a canadian, and I don't want an end to the monarchy.
 
WLDB
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by The Old Medic View Post



In what way does having a monarch harm Canada?

None, which is the main reason its still around. But its pointlessness is also one of the reasons many are against it. Again, there are bigger problems to deal with for the time being. Eventually the constitution will be opened again and once again there are more serious things that should be dealt with then as well. Even so, I'm hoping that this institution is done away with by the time I die (which hopefully wont be for quite a long time).
 

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